All posts filed under: Projects

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Daniel Castro Garcia’s first solo exhibition FOREIGNER opens

“It’s time to leave! If you must die, die in the open sea! You must not return. If any of you come back you’re dead. If any of you come back and report me, you’re dead. If you have to die, you die all together! Now go!” With these words, Aly Gadiaga, one of the migrants portrayed in Daniel Castro Garcia’s Foreigner project, describes his journey from the Libyan coast to Italy. Gadiaga tells his story in a long interview recorded by the artist and included in his exhibition at London’s TJ Boulting, his prize for winning the International Photography Award 2017. The work on show is delicate and sensitive, a far cry from the sensationalised accounts often offered up in the press. “We are all foreigners,” says Castro Garcia, adding that he hopes to inspire respect rather than pity. “It’s not just about respecting those in the photographs – the audience also deserves respect,” he says. “At the heart of this work was the desire to create a dignified response to this humanitarian crisis, …

2017-03-20T15:23:30+00:00

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Alnis Stakle’s Theory of R shows Riga’s dark underbelly

When Alnis Stakle first took up photography, he was faced with a rigid conception of what it could and couldn’t be. In Latvia in the 1990s, photography was largely considered a commercial craft, he says, with any more artistic ambitions restricted to banal nudes and sunsets. But for Stakle, photography is “a kind of religion” that has the power to change our relationship to the world. “Photography is a wonderful medium that makes me look at mundane things and events from another perspective, and enables me to grasp the essential in the meaningless,” he explains. Most of his work is driven by the desire to record his surroundings in a deeply personal way, and his new project – Theory of R – marks an important transition in his life. Moving to Latvia’s capital, Riga, in 2011, he found the global economic crisis was creating a grim urban environment beneath the “shiny veneer” of the city’s tourist attractions. “Half of the people of Latvia reside in Riga, and individuals who suffer from poverty and social exclusion are by no means an unusual …

2017-03-01T12:25:13+00:00

Animal Instincts, from the series Brother & Sister © Viktoria Sorochinski

How Viktoria Sorochinski shot a whole series on a three-week residency

In the spring of 2015 Viktoria Sorochinski found herself on a three-week residency on the island of Halsnøy, Norway. At only 15 square miles, Halsnøy is home to a population of just 2500, but its sylvan landscape became the setting for her series Brother & Sister. Sorochinski had won the residency after a portfolio review at Rencontres d’Arles with organisers Øyvind Hjelmen and Helén Petersen, and was initially very daunted by the prospect. “I was scared because I thought trying to make a whole new narrative project in three weeks seemed like a crazy idea,” she says. “I didn’t even propose a project. I wanted to allow myself to get inspired by the place, and to create something spontaneously. I had been lacking in inspiration for a while before, so this residency brought me back to life, in a way.” When BJP first interviewed Sorochinski it was 2010, and she was living in New York and working on Anna and Eve, her Lucie Award-winning series chronicling the changing relationship of a young mother and her daughter …

2017-01-31T13:49:53+00:00

Fishermen at the mouth of Barking Creek. With raised flood barrier in the background. From the series London Ends © Philipp Ebeling

Philipp Ebeling shoots London’s Ends

“I have always been interested in exploring London, I’ve travelled around London and photographed it for years, but it took me a long time to think of what I was doing as one project because London is so disconnected,” says Philipp Ebeling. “You can pop up out of the tube and be somewhere that looks totally different, and is totally different. “There has never been a grand plan for London – there were attempts after the Second World War, and there was talk of a complete renovation a la Haussmann [who remodelled Paris in the late 18th century], but it has never come to anything. You have Harrow, which was part of the Metroland [the new area opened up by the Metropolitan tube line] then grown by a private developer, then you have the Docklands [which were transformed over the 1980s]. It’s something I very much enjoy, but which makes London a hard subject to put together.” He’s risen to the challenge with his new book, London Ends, which traces a ring around London well out of its better-known …

2017-01-04T17:42:35+00:00

BJP Staff