All posts filed under: Q&A

Francois Hébel’s Foto/Industria opens tomorrow

Foto/Industria Biennial returns to Bologna, with 14 exhibitions centring around the idea of identity and illusion in photographs of work, curated by Francois Hébel and including image-makers such as Thomas Ruff, Josef Koudelka, Lee Friedlander, Joan Fontcuberta, Alexander Rodchenko, Mitch Epstein, Yukichi Watabe, John Myers and Michele Borzoni.

2017-10-11T09:25:16+00:00

Q&A: Nicholas Bonner shows North Korea’s carefully-cultivated image

Nicholas Bonner first visited Korea in 1993, and since then has spent “most of my adult life involved in North Korea”. Now based in Beijing, he makes regular trips to the country with his company, Koryo Tours, and has also put together films and other cultural projects with North Korea with his other business, Koryo Studio. Bonner has collected ephemera from North Korea for nearly 25 years and recently published a book showcasing some of it with Phaidon, Made in North Korea: Graphics from Everyday Life. Featuring everything from metro tickets to stamps, postcards to luggage labels, tinned food labels to gift-wrap, it includes a healthy proportion of photographs made and disseminated by the DPRK. BJP  caught up with him to find out more. 

2017-10-04T10:43:38+00:00

Q&A: Adam Lach creates a wonderland out of small town Polish life

“Neverland came via my participation in the Wrzesnia Collection, a long-term photography project and ongoing photographic residency which is creating an ever-growing photo archive on the Wrzesnia Town and Commune. Every year, the Mayor of Wrzesnia Town and Commune invites one photographer, selected by the curator, to spend some time in the town creating a personal series of images that illustrates the district and its inhabitants. I had a very open brief, it was completely up to me how to portray the place. It’s an extraordinary little city, but it also seems very boring and calm on the face of it. I had to work like a journalist, cooperating with the local newspaper and researching every local event, initiative, meeting or story that could be interesting. All these events were an opportunity to meet the people, to spend some time with the community,” says Polish photographer Adam Lach

2017-09-26T11:38:57+00:00

Political unrest in Thailand, in Harit Srikhao’s Whitewash

“Just a few days after the opening, soldiers entered the gallery and removed some of the photographs,” says Harit Srikhao, a runner-up in this year’s BJP Breakthrough Awards. The Thai photographer, whose series Whitewash uses the military crackdown in 2010 as its starting point, questions government control, censorship and propaganda. “You are able to talk about politics in public, but if you talk ‘bluntly’, you would be arrested,” says Srikhao.

2017-08-25T15:28:56+00:00

Book: Amplitude No.1 – 10 publications by 10 Russian photographers

Founded in 2006 by photographer and curator Olga Korsunova, art-manager and photography critic Nadya Sheremetova, and art historian Elena Zyrianova, FotoDepartment is a gallery, bookshop, library and education hub in St. Petersburg, Russia. Aiming to promote and develop contemporary Russian photography at home and abroad, FotoDepartment runs many events, exhibitions and workshops, and represents internationally-recognised artists such as Kirill Savchenkov, Irina Yulieva, and Jana Romanova. FotoDepartment is also currently running several digital projects. Now it’s started a publishing project called Amplitude, creating photobooks of emerging Russian photographers’ work which can be read individually, or gathered together into groups. Amplitude No.1 includes photobooks by Alexey Bogolepov, Margo Ovcharenko, Irina Zadorozhnaia, Anastasia Tsayder, Igor Samolet, Yury Gudkov, Olya Ivanova, Irina Ivannikova, Anastasia Tailakova, and Irina Yulieva. BJP caught up with Nadya Sheremetova to find out more

2017-08-02T15:14:32+00:00

Arles 2017: Q&A with Jacob Aue Sobol

Born in Denmark in 1976, Jacob Aue Sobol studied at the Fatamorgana Danish School of Art Photography from 1998-1999. In Autumn 1999, he went to live in the Tiniteqilaaq settlement in Greenland, and mainly stayed with his Greenlandic girlfriend Sabine and her family for the next three years. The resulting book, Sabine, was published in 2004, and nominated for the 2005 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize. In 2005, Aue Sobol travelled with a film crew to Guatemala, to make a documentary about a young Mayan girl’s first journey to the ocean. The following year he returned alone and he met the indigenous Gomez-Brito family, and stayed with them for a month. His story on the family won the Daily Life Stories award in the 2006 World Press Photo.  In 2006 he moved to Tokyo, and shot a series of images that won the 2008 Leica European Publishers Award. I, Tokyo was published by Actes Sud (France), Apeiron (Greece), Dewi Lewis Publishing (Great Britain), Edition Braus (Germany), Lunwerg Editores (Spain) and Peliti Associati (Italy). Sobol became a nominee at Magnum Photos in 2007, and a full member in 2012. Aue …

2017-08-10T12:10:29+00:00

Q&A: J A Mortram on his ten-year project Small Town Inertia

Jim Mortram started shooting people in and around Dereham, a small town in Norfolk, in 2007, focusing on those facing disadvantages and social exclusion. The resulting blog has been critically acclaimed, and he’s now publishing the project as a book

2017-06-27T11:43:53+00:00

Q&A: Paul Hutchinson on shooting b-boys, butterflies and U-Bahnhofs

Born in 1987 in Berlin, Paul Hutchinson graduated from the University of the Arts, Berlin in 2012, and from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, London in 2014. While in London he assisted Wolfgang Tillmans, and by 2015 he had published his first book – B-Boys, Fly Girls and Horticulture. He has gone on to publish two more, Wildlife Photography in 2016 and Schmetterlinge [Butterflies] in 2017. Hutchinson has won various awards and grants, and has shown his work at Galerie Mansart, the Berlinische Galerie Museum of Modern Art and The Photographers Gallery. The recent exhibition Perfect Storm, at the NRW Forum in Dusseldorf, included Hutchinson’s photographs alongside work by other fast-emerging image-makers such as Thomas Albdorf, Andrey Bogush, Vendula Knopova, Maurice van Es and Nikolas Ventourakis. BJP: You were a bit of a tearaway at school, how did you get into photography? Paul Hutchinson: I was never a typical troublemaker or bully, it was always about curiosity and trying things off the beaten track, which obviously hit some borders in the context …

2017-04-20T15:12:08+00:00

Q&A: Marco Pietracupa on his new book, Shapeshifter

Born in the Italian South Tyrol in 1967, Marco Pietracupa moved to Milan in the early 1990s, where he studied at the Italian Institute of Photography and swiftly started working in the art and fashion industries. His work has been published by L’Officiel, L’Uomo Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Wallpaper and Rolling Stone, and he has also shown at Vice’s Milan Gallery, the Brownstone Foundation in Paris, the Asni Gallery in Addis Ababa, among others. He recently published his first monograph, Shapeshifter, with Yard Press.  BJP: How did you get into photography? MP: My passion started a long time ago, when I was very young. I felt the need to communicate in some unique way, with my own language. Photography seemed to me the best medium to express myself. BJP: How did you get into fashion photography? MP: I studied at the Istituto Italiano di Fotografia (Italian Institute of Photography) in Milan, which has a fashion photography course. Fashion’s visual aesthetic was shifting to a style similar to mine at the time and, even though I was new to …

2017-05-09T12:38:56+00:00

Q&A: Peter van Agtmael on his new book, Buzzing at the Sill

Born in Washington DC in 1981, Peter van Agtmael studied history at Yale before moving into documentary photography. Largely focusing on America, his work considers issues such as power, race and class; he also works on the Israel/Palestine conflict and throughout the Middle East. He has won the W.Eugene Smith Grant, the ICP Infinity Award for Young Photographers and many more, and joined Magnum Photos in 2008. His book Disco Night Sept 11, a study of the USA post-9/11, was published in 2014 and named a Book of the Year by titles such as The New York Times Magazine and Time Magazine. His latest photobook, Buzzing at the Sill, is the sequel.  BJP: Where does the title Buzzing at the Sill come from? PvA: It’s from a Theodore Roethke poem called In a Dark Time. I heard an excerpt of it in a play called The Nether and afterwards looked it up. I was profoundly moved. The poem made me feel like it was somehow related to me and the work I’d been doing, and so I kept it in the back of …

2017-03-06T12:26:57+00:00

BJP Staff