All posts filed under: Q&A

Galerie Huit Arles: If Walls Could Talk

Situated within a late 17th century mansion, in the historical centre of the UNESCO world heritage site of Arles, lies Galerie Huit Arles, which has been at the heart of the town’s photography scene since its inception in 2007. This is no mean feat. The small Provencal town is home to Les Rencontres d’Arles, the world’s first and foremost photography festival. The doors of the gallery open onto a neo-classical salon, its painted and gilded panels displaying a changing selection of modern photographs, before moving across a series of artfully decorated rooms, stylistically spanning several centuries. Julia de Bierre, Galerie Huit Arles’ owner, founder and curator, has always ensured she exhibits an array of high-profile works on the gallery walls. Soon after opening, she presented the V&A Museum’s Theatre Department exhibition of photographer Simon Annand’s ‘The Half’. She has shown a number of photographic installations, including that of Matthias Olmeta in the below-stair vaults, and series such as Clementine Schneidermann’s ‘I called her Lisa Marie’, and Vee Speers’ 2017 ‘Dystopia’ show. The gallery’s artist-in-residence programme …

2018-06-27T10:06:59+00:00

‘When something is less seen, it contains more value’

Daniel Miller is a photography dealer residing on the west coast of the United States, and proprietor of two galleries in Venice Beach and Santa Monica. He is also the founder of photography collecting site YourDailyPhotograph, an initiative that supplies collectors with a variety of images to their inbox each day, which they can then purchase from a trusted source. With more than 7,000 collectors from 75 different countries currently subscribing, Miller has developed a wealth of knowledge on the current photography market, including on key market trends and driving factors. Here he offers some of his advice on collecting in the current art photography market, to coincide with the release of our first free e-guide, The Beginner’s Guide to Collecting Photography. Why is now a good time for people to invest in the photography market? Globally, photography is one of the youngest categories of collectable art. As such, there are still terrific deals available to collectors looking for great images. Specifically looking at the UK, the photography market has great room for growth. Photo London …

2018-05-18T13:55:55+00:00

Photo London: ‘Good art is always in demand and bad art will be always abundant’

ALMANAQUE opened in February 2016 in Mexico City, with a dedication to contemporary photography.  The gallery exhibits and sells international works from both established and emerging artists, exploring current manifestations on image as an artistic dispositive. Alongside gallery work, ALMANAQUE has begun a Portafolio initiative, offering professional consultations on collecting, curating and art direction for individuals, corporations and institutions. We spoke to director Arturo Delgado ahead of Photo London, to find out more about the artists ALMANAQUE are bringing to the event, and to hear Arturo’s insights on collecting. What excites you the most about exhibiting your artists at Photo London? The opportunity to share our multi-award winning artists with the UK public. We are bringing four artists to the fair; three from Mexico and one from Russia, representing several generations of contemporary imagery. These renowned artists all have an unexpected bond to the UK. Which artists’ work will you be showing at Photo London? Why? We will be showing work by the preeminent Pablo Ortiz Monasterio, one of the most renowned Mexican photographers, whose …

2018-05-16T16:40:31+00:00

Photo London: ‘Never buy anything you don’t love!’

White Cube was first opened in 1993 by Jay Jopling, in a small, square room in London’s West End. It now has an exhibition programme extending across three gallery spaces; Bermondsey in South London, Mason’s Yard in St. James’s London, and Hong Kong’s Central District. Since 1993, White Cube has exhibited the work of many of the world’s most highly acclaimed contemporary artists. At Photo London, White Cube will present a solo exhibition by the British artist Darren Almond in the Studio Room Gallery. Almond’s diverse practice incorporates film, installation, sculpture, painting and photography, producing evocative meditations on time and duration, alongside themes of personal and historical memory. We caught up with the director of White Cube, Julia Baumhoff Zouk, to find out more about Darren Almond, and to hear her tips on developing a personal photography collection. What excites you most about exhibiting your artists at Photo London? Photo London is the only photography fair we have in the UK, and since its first edition in 2015, it has become more and more important. …

2018-05-15T13:12:56+00:00

Photo London: ‘Follow your own style’

29 ARTS IN PROGRESS was founded in 2013 by Luca Casulli and Eugenio Calini, with an interest in representing artists specialising in photo-based art. Located in the heart of Milan, the gallery exhibits the work of internationally recognised photographers, including both contemporary and modern masters. Casulli and Calini also represent a group of younger emerging photographers, holding an open call each year to search for talented and as yet undiscovered artists. In the five years since its inception, 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS has curated more than thirty exhibitions in partnership with international museums and organisations, such as The V&A Museum, The Hong Kong Arts Centre, The MAMM in Moscow, ERARTA Museum in St. Petersburg, Palazzo Reale and La Triennale Museum in Milan. We spoke to founders and directors Casulli and Calini, to find out more about their involvement in Photo London. What excites you the most about exhibiting your artists at Photo London? Exhibiting at Photo London is a great opportunity to reach a global audience of collectors. It’s also a great networking event where …

2018-05-15T13:14:48+00:00

The most important things to consider when producing an exhibition

When it comes to exhibiting your photography, every aspect has a vital role in showing your work at its best; from the type of paper you print on, to the way you present the final images. Yet, although exhibitions are a great way of getting your work seen, they can be expensive to produce. In the interview that follows, David Lucken of Shoreditch-based print and framing service theprintspace outlines the key factors to consider when producing an exhibition. Established in 2007, theprintspace is a firm favourite among London-based creatives for its high quality art printing. As well as its expertise in printing, theprintspace hosts exhibitions in its east London gallery and recently showcased British Journal of Photography’s DJI Drone Photography Award. What are the best options for early-career and student photographers, who are often printing their work for exhibition on a budget? Even on a budget, you want good quality and value for money. C-Type printing is cheaper in price than Giclée printing but this does not mean lower quality; it is purely down to …

2018-05-15T15:16:54+00:00

Photo London: ‘Can art be used as a vehicle to inspire change in society?’

Rubber Factory is a contemporary art gallery on New York’s Lower East Side, focusing on conceptual photography that challenges the boundaries of the medium. The gallery opened in 2016, a first for director Mike Tan, who lovingly named it after his family’s rubber factory in Malaysia. Tan works against the book. His curatorial vision seeks to make visible the processes that underpin the making of the artworks, by engaging stakeholders in the photographic community. Tan nurtures personal relationships with artists, and is always looking to support traditionally underrepresented groups in the art world and artists working towards social change. One of Rubber Factory’s initiatives is holding monthly sessions where both emerging and established photographers can present and talk about their works in progress. As a relatively new gallery exhibiting at Photo London this year, we spoke to Tan about developing Rubber Factory’s photographic collection, and his focus on bringing boundary-pushing artists to the fair. What excites you most about exhibiting your artists at Photo London? As a gallerist, having the chance to showcase our artists …

2018-05-15T13:08:22+00:00

A Portrait of Resilience: This Week’s People’s Choice Winning portrait

Vikram Kushwah’s portrait is of his friend’s teenage daughter, Jasmine, who is in her second year of cancer treatment. Inspired by his wife, who also had cancer in her teens and lost her hair, Kushwah’s aim for the image and wider series was to give Jasmine a sense of empowerment. Indian-born Kushwah initially studied fashion at University, before taking a photography module that got him hooked on taking pictures. Kushwah decided from there that he wanted to be a photographer. His work encompasses both art and fashion photography, and he has been featured in several high-profile exhibitions, such as Vogue Italia’s Best of PhotoVogue, and the recent Association of Photographers AOP50: Images that Defined an Age. He also received bronze at the Young Lions’ Award in the Best Photography category at Cannes. Can you tell me about the portrait you entered into Portrait of Britain 2018? What is the story behind it? Jasmine, my subject for the photograph, is the 14-year-old daughter of a friend. She is in her second year of cancer treatment. Prior …

2018-04-27T14:05:50+00:00

Portrait of Britain: Diversifying the Traditional Group Portrait

Frederic Aranda is a photographer specializing in group portraiture. His work has twice been selected for Portrait of Britain, with both his winning images standing out for their dramatic feel and quirky composure. Aranda works against the grain. His images shirk traditionally hierarchical, staid forms of group portraiture, and aim for naturalism and diversity. Aranda was born in Switzerland but moved to the UK twenty years ago, initially to study Japanese at Oxford. A completely self-taught photographer, Aranda has since worked for a number of high-profile publications, including Vanity Fair and Vogue. He has also been shortlisted by The Times as Young Photographer of the Year, and his first photobook, Electric Fashion, was published by Skira in 2015, and launched at the V&A. Since being selected for Portrait of Britain, Aranda has won first prize for editorial in the Swiss Photo Award, for his portfolio of group projects. How did you create the selected portraits that you entered into Portrait of Britain 2016, and what are the stories behind them? I had two images selected: …

2018-04-25T09:58:05+00:00

Q&A: Ronaldo Schemidt, World Press Photo of the Year winner

“Normally people don’t get set on fire during the protests, but there were many barricades on fire and the demonstrators use Molotov bombs,” says Ronaldo Schemidt. “I got the photo when a National Guard motorcycle exploded during a clash between demonstrators and government forces. It was lying on the floor, on fire, surrounded by young people. One of the protestors hit the tank, generating an explosion. Then the guy in the photo caught fire. I was standing a few meters away with my back to him, but when I felt the heat of the flames, I got my camera and turned around to start shooting whatever had just happened. It all took just a few seconds, so I didn’t know what I was shooting. I was moved by instinct, it was very quick. I didn’t stop shooting until I realised what was going on. There was somebody on fire running towards me.”

2018-05-01T11:06:56+00:00

BJP Staff