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Untitled - from the series 'Senselessness' © Laura Thompson

From air freshener ape men to rubber gloved ghouls: A look into the D&AD 2016 Shortlisted project by Laura Thompson

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Technology expands perception. Air travel turns a journey of thousands of miles into a matter of hours. Google Maps shows us the way through unfamiliar city streets. Over Skype we can see and hear our loved ones wherever we and they are. But our new abilities have come at a price. Our physical senses have deadened. Laura Thompson came across this conception in a study by Claude Levi Strauss, which described how members of a particular tribe could see Venus in daylight. The anthropologist noted that this was a skill that Western sailors had had in the past, but lost over time since they no longer used it to navigate. “I was surprised to learn that you aren’t born with an innate ability to sense things,” says Thompson, whose series Senseless was shortlisted for the 2016 D&AD Next Photographer Award in partnership with Getty Images. “It develops as you’re a child, your senses adapt to the specifics of your environment. Advances in technology bring passivity. Certain parts of our brains don’t develop because technology is …

2017-02-24T11:01:08+00:00

From the series “Mädchenland” © Karolin Klüppel, winner Portait category and Gold Award, Felix Schoeller Photo Award 2015

Kingdom of the Girls: The alternate reality where women rule the world

That world exists, if you know where to look. Berlin-based photographer Karolin Klüppel’s pictures of rare matriarchal communities in India and China – which won the 2015 Felix Schoeller Photo Award – invite us to do exactly that. Born in 1985, Klüppel developed an interest in alternatives to patriarchy while studying photography at the School of Art and Design in Kassel, where her final project deconstructed gender through soft, fragile portraits of the male nude. On graduating in 2013 she embarked on a self-financed trip to India, where she had a residency lined up with the Vice-Versa Foundation in Goa. Initially the plan was to stay half a year in India before heading to China, to photograph the Mosuo, a matriarchal society in the Himalayas, but she ended up spending nine months in Mawlynnong, a Khasi village in the State of Meghalaya, northeast India. The photographs she shot there became the portrait series Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls), for which she won the prestigious 2015 Felix Schoeller Photo Award. Klüppel had read about the Khasi while …

2017-02-23T16:46:32+00:00

Untitled #174 © Simen Johan

On Post-Production: Delving into the practices of 3 critically-acclaimed photographers

On Post-Production, Part 1: Klaus Pichler on bringing together analogue and digital techniques The first in the series taking you behind the image. Photographer Klaus Pichler shares his secret recipe for post production and his creative know-how. Read Klaus’ feature here. On Post-Production, Part 2: An insight into photographer Dean Chalkley’s workflow In the second instalment of this series, Dean Chalkley talks authenticity, why having fun making pictures is important to him, and how post-processing is a means to an end. Read Dean’s feature here. On Post-Production, Part 3: Inside the fantastical world of photographer Simen Johan In the third instalment of this series which looks at post-processing in the photographer’s workflow, Simen Johan talks about how he creates his beguiling images and why digital capture and the best modern imaging software gives him the freedom he craves. Read Simen’s feature here. Sponsored by Adobe Make your best shots even better with Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photography plan. With all the photography essentials, such as Lightroom and Photoshop, you’ll have the world’s leading tools to help you craft …

2017-02-23T16:07:47+00:00

Untitled #174 © Simen Johan

On Post-Production, Pt. 3: Inside the fantastical world of photographer Simen Johan

Scandinavian photographer Simen Johan, known for his flawless digital composite images, has been likened to a film director in the past. So it is fitting that the artist, represented by Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, dreamt of making movies when he was growing up. Inspired and encouraged by his step-grandfather, the American movie producer and director Rod E. Geiger, Johan went to film school in Sweden before relocating to New York in 1992 to study film at the School of Visual Arts. He switched to photography during his time there, and although Johan has made his name as a fine art photographer, it is clear filmmaking still fascinates him. “I was attracted to filmmaking’s ability to create an immersive experience, through image, sound and motion,” says Johan. “Movies by directors such as Stanley Kubrick, David Lynch, and David Cronenberg transported me to suspenseful, strange and psychologically-charged places that didn’t merely entertain, but revealed complex truths about life, people and the world. “Photography to me was the next best thing to filmmaking,” he continues. “I had taken …

2017-01-27T11:09:50+00:00

Daft Punk : ©Dean Chalkley / NME / Time Inc (UK)

On Post-Production, Pt. 2: An insight into photographer Dean Chalkley’s workflow

English photographer and filmmaker Dean Chalkley (represented by Lo And Behold) has a reputation for being one of the nicest guys in the industry, and when he answers the phone, within seconds his infectious energy and charisma pour out. He barely pauses for breath during our hour-long call and peppers the conversation with lively anecdotes and colourful analogies. Over the past twenty years, Chalkley has built a reputation as one of the finest and most respected photographers of music and culture. He has photographed everyone from Daft Punk to Simon Cowell, Scarlett Johansson, Oasis, Jarvis Cocker, and The Cure, and shot for brands including Levi’s, Ray-Ban, Sony Music, and Adidas. Just the other week he was photographing DJs for the BBC, he says, and recently he published a book of his work, One. Chalkley wanted to be a fashion designer, but studied photography at Blackpool and Fylde College before shooting for Dazed and Confused magazine in the 90s. He still regularly shoots editorial, most recently for ShortList, the Observer Magazine, and ES Magazine, and he waxes lyrical …

2017-01-18T11:23:26+00:00

© Klaus Pichler

On Post-Production, Pt. 1: Klaus Pichler on bringing together analogue and digital techniques

Austrian photographer Klaus Pichler is out climbing a volcano in Lanzarote the first time I try to get in touch. The next day he’s relaxing on the Spanish island’s sandy beaches, taking a well-deserved break after a busy 2016. In the past year, Pichler has won the first prize at Cortona on the Move for his project Golden Days Before They End, about Austria’s last remaining dive bars (featured in our November issue), and the Outstanding Artists Award from the Austrian Ministry of Culture. He has also been working on his latest personal project, This will change your life forever, an exploration of what he called the “swarm stupidity” of New Age esotericism. He’s also seen the publication of his two brand books for Schock, the German kitchen designer, both of which were designed to live up to the client’s name (and featured in BJP’s May issue). Featuring bold artificiality, wacky compositions and clashing colours, these books pair racoons with poodles, and turtles with flamingoes, and generally make the world of sinks look more exciting …

2017-01-27T12:01:04+00:00

IMG_1476 (1)

Sponsored: Summer inspiration from Adobe with Creative Cloud offer

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Photographers from across the UK attended the live event to hear from a line-up of talented speakers, including Adobe’s Principal Solutions Consultant Richard Curtis, photographer and director Sophie Ebrard, Photoshop expert Gavin Hoey and fine art, fashion and conceptual artist Bella Kotak. The sessions included untold stories from the professionals, as well as tips and tricks that any photographer can take advantage of to make their best shots even better. Along with the sessions, the event saw 10 photographers take part in a unique photography challenge. The photographers were tasked to take to the streets of Shoreditch, London to capture shots inspired by the quote: “What makes photography a strange invention is that its primary raw materials are light and time” To celebrate your own summer moments, for a limited time only, you can get the Adobe Creative Cloud Photography plan for only £6.98 per month (incl. VAT). You’ll have access to the world’s leading photography tools such as Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom CC. The offer ends on 2 September 2016. Head over to Adobe’s …

2016-08-31T11:29:58+00:00

From the Changing Perspectives series © Jamey Stillings

Third edition of the Syngenta Photography Award opens, with a $65,000 prize

The third Syngenta Photography Award is now open for entries and explores the theme ‘Grow-Conserve’. As the world’s population continues to increase, so does the tension between our growing demand for more food, energy and resources, and the protection of our planet. How can we manage economic, social and technological growth in a way that supports the needs of today as well as for future generations? Bold and transformative action is needed. Professional and amateur photographers from all over the world are invited to submit applications in two categories – the Professional Commission and the Open Competition. The Award prize totals $65,000 which includes a $25,000 professional commission for the first prize winner in the professional category to develop a photography project around the theme of the year. An exhibition will be held in March 2017, featuring the work of the finalists for the Award as well as images that illustrate the themes that have emerged from the submissions. Entries will be judged by a distinguished international judging panel chaired by the author and curator William …

2016-06-15T10:10:11+00:00

GRAND PRIZE - Anurag Kumar - India

The Hamdan International Photography Award is open for entry, with a $120,000 prize

Capturing fleeting moments of joy is one of the most rewarding aspects of photography, so it seems inevitable that the main theme for the fifth season of the Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum International Photography Award (or HIPA) is Happiness.  With a total prize pool of $400,000 and a Grand Prize of $120,000 the award is a career-changing opportunity for any photographer. Last year’s competition (themed Life in Colour) involved 30,878 participants from 166 countries submitting a total of 60,162 photographs. To ensure more photographers receive recognition, the award is divided into four categories, with winners and four runners-up in each category receiving prize money.. Happiness, in their words, the “main pursuit of humanity,” is the premier category, with the winner receiving $25,000. The Wildlife category aimed at “those who thrive on capturing hard-to-get instances that cannot be repeated, to deliver the excitement and thrill of wildlife whether on land, in the air or sea. The Father & Son category touches on a bond not often demonstrated in photography, and HIPA hope to find …

2016-01-13T14:31:27+00:00

PierreManning copy

Mastered with Nick Knight: 10 photographers reimagine Christmas

Tired of the saccharine, syrupy images we are bombarded with at this time of year, we asked photographers on the Photography: Mastered with Nick Knight talent programme to reimagine the festive season. The result? A collection of shots that range from the personal and thought-provoking to the kitsch and tongue in cheek; seeing the photographers take a step back from modern day representations of the festive season to create images that juxtapose seasonal revelry with wider social issues and personal experiences. Whether it’s Agustina Rodriguez’s ode to loved ones missed or Irvin Rivera’s take on an off-duty Santa, there’s at once poignancy and humour running throughout these images. The consumerism that so pervades at this time of year is also absent here, with Zuzia Zawada and Pierre Manning focusing on themes such as depression and child homelessness, and Michael Barr and Debora Barnaba emphasising innocence and naivety. Just as childhood favourite, the Grinch, muses “W​hat if Christmas, he thought, doesn’t come from a store. What if Christmas, perhaps, means a little bit more?”     In place …

2015-12-22T11:56:43+00:00

BJP Staff