All posts filed under: Sponsored

Untitled (from the series, Timanfaya)
2012
Angus Fraser

Why you should study a Master’s degree

When it comes to photography, Aaron Schuman is a man of many talents. A successful photographer in his own right – most notably for FOLK, chosen by both Alec Soth and Jason Fulford as one of the “Best Photobooks of 2016” – he’s also a well-known curator, writer and educator. In 2014 he curated Krakow Photomonth, featuring nine major exhibitions by artists such as Clare Strand, Trevor Paglen and Taryn Simon; in 2016, he curated Indivisible: New American Documents at FOMU: FotoMuseum Antwerp , including work by Gregory Halpern, Sam Contis and Bayeté Ross Smith. He regularly writes for magazines such as Frieze, Aperture, and the British Journal of Photography, has contributed to books such as Alec Soth’s Gathered Leaves and The Photographer’s Playbook, and set up his own online journal, SeeSaw Magazine, in 2004. Recently he became a Senior Lecturer in Photography at the University of the West of England (UWE), and has taken part in live talks and events for Magnum Photos, The Photographers’ Gallery, the National Media Museum and Jaipur Photo Festival. …

2017-04-14T18:11:26+00:00

Lighthouse (north), 2011. Catherine Yass.
© Catherine Yass. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2017. Image courtesy Alison Jacques Gallery.

When does photography stop being photography?

What is photography? Over the past few years contemporary photographers have incorporated sculpture, performance, moving image, analogue processes and digital technologies into their practice, stoking a sometimes-heated debate about where exactly the medium begins and ends. But for Catherine Yass, such experimentation is nothing new. In a conversation with BJP and DACS, the not-for-profit artist rights management organisation, Yass explained that she doesn’t, in fact, consider herself a photographer, but an artist who works with photography. Born in 1963, she’s noted for her vivid, glowing photographs shown against light boxes, as well as her films and installations. Her subjects are often vacant urban spaces, construction sites, monuments of the modern industrial age and the people and institutions who commission her. “The way we are positioned by and position ourselves in relation to our surroundings both reflects and affects our state of mind and our sense of ourselves in the world,” she says. “The built environment is a form of communication and an expression of society.” In her Decommissioned (2011) series Yass photographed a car showroom and …

2017-04-12T10:59:16+00:00

© Dougie Wallace/INSTITUTE

From Botoxed faces to yapping pooches: A glimpse inside the hidden world of the super rich

If there is a photographer who has a knack for being in the right place at the right time, it’s Dougie Wallace. For more than ten years, the East London-based Glaswegian photographer, has been turning his camera on everyone from stags and hens to Shoreditch hipsters, Bombay taxi drivers, and now the super rich. Getting uncomfortably close to his subjects with a double flashgun, Glaswegee as he is known creates colourful unforgiving images that reveal the unedited reality behind his subjects. We see stags trussed up like turkeys, scantily-clad women cavorting around London, and yapping dogs snarling into the lens. Few photographers get closer than this. In particular, Wallace’s Olympus-shot images of the global super rich in London’s elite districts of Knightsbridge and Chelsea paint a telling picture of glut and greed. This so-called ‘one per cent’ is the subject of Wallace’s Harrodsburg, a project recently published as a book by Dewi Lewis. It is nothing less than a visual satire on the ultra affluent elite and their exorbitant spending habits. Wallace, who is represented …

2017-03-10T11:38:49+00:00

Chiwetel Ejiofor I, 2013 © Nadav Kander

How do you speak Nadav Kander? The man himself on mastering your creative language

British Journal of Photography caught up with Nadav Kander ahead of his appearance at The Photography Show 2017 in Birmingham. Conversation quickly turned to his recent much debated image of Donald Trump. Normally when Nadav Kander turns up to shoot a portrait, the only thing he’s thought through beforehand is the lighting. But Donald Trump was different. “I was really divided about how I should do it – how to do this TIME cover justice without putting my political views out there,” he says of his commission to photograph the US president for TIME’s 2016 Person of the Year cover. “If you photograph properly, you’re talking about a coming together of two histories. A person of 70, who’s had a life of 70 years, and a person of 54, who’s had a life of 54 years. As soon as politics comes in, you change things. It’s difficult to exclude that but you need to if you’re making a mature portrait that’s going to have any lasting effect.” What inspires him about photography has evolved with …

2017-03-10T12:21:39+00:00

A man has his head shaved, South Beach, Miami

Miami is a seaport city on the Atlantic Ocean in south Florida. Miami's metro area is the eighth-most populous and fourth-largest urban area in the U.S., with a population of around 5.5 million.

Miami is a major center, and a leader in finance, commerce, culture, media, entertainment, the arts, and international trade. In 2008, Forbes magazine ranked Miami "America's Cleanest City", for its year-round good air quality, vast green spaces, clean drinking water, clean streets, and city-wide recycling programs. According to a 2009 UBS study of 73 world cities, Miami was ranked as the richest city in the United States, and the world's fifth-richest city in terms of purchasing power. Miami is nicknamed the "Capital of Latin America", is the second largest U.S. city with a Spanish-speaking majority, and the largest city with a Cuban-American plurality.

©Peter Dench/Getty Images Reportage

Is America great again? Peter Dench goes beyond the red, white and blue to document the “land of the free”.

Over the years he’s created a huge archive of images documenting ‘Britishness’, covering topics such as Brits abroad and alcohol consumption in England. Now Peter Dench has his sights set on America. In the summer of 2015, commissioned by Olympus, Dench travelled to Dallas to record his first instalment in documenting the daily life of the people who live there. He photographed everything from a bikini contest to Buddhist monks, baseball fans and Sunday worshippers, capturing in his images the essence of what it means to be American in the 21st century. He’s also photographed in Miami and San Francisco, all part of his quest “to challenge what I thought I knew of the country.” Dench, a pro photographer for more than 20 years, has long been fascinated by America. As a teenager in the 1980s he remembers how he “voraciously consumed the American soap operas Dallas and Baywatch”, and when he was studying photography he read books by Diane Arbus, Walker Evans, Robert Frank and Tony Ray-Jones. These photographers “alerted me to the fact …

2017-03-03T11:07:22+00:00

Untitled - from the series 'Senselessness' © Laura Thompson

From air freshener ape men to rubber gloved ghouls: A look into the D&AD 2016 Shortlisted project by Laura Thompson

BJP

Technology expands perception. Air travel turns a journey of thousands of miles into a matter of hours. Google Maps shows us the way through unfamiliar city streets. Over Skype we can see and hear our loved ones wherever we and they are. But our new abilities have come at a price. Our physical senses have deadened. Laura Thompson came across this conception in a study by Claude Levi Strauss, which described how members of a particular tribe could see Venus in daylight. The anthropologist noted that this was a skill that Western sailors had had in the past, but lost over time since they no longer used it to navigate. “I was surprised to learn that you aren’t born with an innate ability to sense things,” says Thompson, whose series Senseless was shortlisted for the 2016 D&AD Next Photographer Award in partnership with Getty Images. “It develops as you’re a child, your senses adapt to the specifics of your environment. Advances in technology bring passivity. Certain parts of our brains don’t develop because technology is …

2017-02-24T11:01:08+00:00

From the series “Mädchenland” © Karolin Klüppel, winner Portait category and Gold Award, Felix Schoeller Photo Award 2015

Kingdom of the Girls: The alternate reality where women rule the world

That world exists, if you know where to look. Berlin-based photographer Karolin Klüppel’s pictures of rare matriarchal communities in India and China – which won the 2015 Felix Schoeller Photo Award – invite us to do exactly that. Born in 1985, Klüppel developed an interest in alternatives to patriarchy while studying photography at the School of Art and Design in Kassel, where her final project deconstructed gender through soft, fragile portraits of the male nude. On graduating in 2013 she embarked on a self-financed trip to India, where she had a residency lined up with the Vice-Versa Foundation in Goa. Initially the plan was to stay half a year in India before heading to China, to photograph the Mosuo, a matriarchal society in the Himalayas, but she ended up spending nine months in Mawlynnong, a Khasi village in the State of Meghalaya, northeast India. The photographs she shot there became the portrait series Mädchenland (Kingdom of Girls), for which she won the prestigious 2015 Felix Schoeller Photo Award. Klüppel had read about the Khasi while …

2017-02-23T16:46:32+00:00

Untitled #174 © Simen Johan

On Post-Production: Delving into the practices of 3 critically-acclaimed photographers

On Post-Production, Part 1: Klaus Pichler on bringing together analogue and digital techniques The first in the series taking you behind the image. Photographer Klaus Pichler shares his secret recipe for post production and his creative know-how. Read Klaus’ feature here. On Post-Production, Part 2: An insight into photographer Dean Chalkley’s workflow In the second instalment of this series, Dean Chalkley talks authenticity, why having fun making pictures is important to him, and how post-processing is a means to an end. Read Dean’s feature here. On Post-Production, Part 3: Inside the fantastical world of photographer Simen Johan In the third instalment of this series which looks at post-processing in the photographer’s workflow, Simen Johan talks about how he creates his beguiling images and why digital capture and the best modern imaging software gives him the freedom he craves. Read Simen’s feature here. Sponsored by Adobe Make your best shots even better with Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photography plan. With all the photography essentials, such as Lightroom and Photoshop, you’ll have the world’s leading tools to help you craft …

2017-02-23T16:07:47+00:00

Untitled #174 © Simen Johan

On Post-Production, Pt. 3: Inside the fantastical world of photographer Simen Johan

Scandinavian photographer Simen Johan, known for his flawless digital composite images, has been likened to a film director in the past. So it is fitting that the artist, represented by Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, dreamt of making movies when he was growing up. Inspired and encouraged by his step-grandfather, the American movie producer and director Rod E. Geiger, Johan went to film school in Sweden before relocating to New York in 1992 to study film at the School of Visual Arts. He switched to photography during his time there, and although Johan has made his name as a fine art photographer, it is clear filmmaking still fascinates him. “I was attracted to filmmaking’s ability to create an immersive experience, through image, sound and motion,” says Johan. “Movies by directors such as Stanley Kubrick, David Lynch, and David Cronenberg transported me to suspenseful, strange and psychologically-charged places that didn’t merely entertain, but revealed complex truths about life, people and the world. “Photography to me was the next best thing to filmmaking,” he continues. “I had taken …

2017-01-27T11:09:50+00:00

Daft Punk : ©Dean Chalkley / NME / Time Inc (UK)

On Post-Production, Pt. 2: An insight into photographer Dean Chalkley’s workflow

English photographer and filmmaker Dean Chalkley (represented by Lo And Behold) has a reputation for being one of the nicest guys in the industry, and when he answers the phone, within seconds his infectious energy and charisma pour out. He barely pauses for breath during our hour-long call and peppers the conversation with lively anecdotes and colourful analogies. Over the past twenty years, Chalkley has built a reputation as one of the finest and most respected photographers of music and culture. He has photographed everyone from Daft Punk to Simon Cowell, Scarlett Johansson, Oasis, Jarvis Cocker, and The Cure, and shot for brands including Levi’s, Ray-Ban, Sony Music, and Adidas. Just the other week he was photographing DJs for the BBC, he says, and recently he published a book of his work, One. Chalkley wanted to be a fashion designer, but studied photography at Blackpool and Fylde College before shooting for Dazed and Confused magazine in the 90s. He still regularly shoots editorial, most recently for ShortList, the Observer Magazine, and ES Magazine, and he waxes lyrical …

2017-01-18T11:23:26+00:00

BJP Staff