All posts filed under: World Press Photo 2017

Morton County Sheriffs - Riot police clear marchers from a secondary road outside a Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) worker camp using rubber bullets, pepper spray, tasers and arrests. In other incidents they've employed militarized vehicles, water canons, tear gas and have been accused of using percussion grenades. Image © Amber Bracken, first prize Contemporary Issues – Stories in the 2017 World Press Photos

Amber Bracken wins WPP award in Contemporary Issues category

Albertan photographer Amber Bracken is the 2017 first prize winner of the World Press Photography award in the Contemporary Issues category. Bracken, whose work is particularly concerned over the relationship between indigenous communities and the government in Canada and North America, has earned the high profile award for her documentation of the increasingly desperate protests against the North Dakota Pipeline at Standing Rock. “I’ve been compelled by issues of indigenous rights for some time now,” says Bracken. “Especially after Canada’s Idle No More movement. The fallout of colonisation and the ongoing betrayal of treaties is the greatest source of domestic injustice in the western world. ” The demonstrations in North Dakota began early last year, where the Standing Rock native Indian tribes and hundreds of others began to protest the construction of a water pipeline that would run from the Bakken oil fields in the western part of the state, down to south Illinois. It would cross directly beneath the Mississippi Rivers and cut straight through a number of ancient, sacred burial sites. Just a few …

2017-03-01T17:34:51+00:00

Out of the Way © Elena Anosova, which won second prize in the Daily Life - Stories categories at the 2017 World Press Photo. World Press managing director Lars Boering says the paucity of women in photojournalism is one of the key issues he wants to debate at the organisation's many new initiatives this year

World Press Photo’s Lars Boering and the fight against “fake news”

Lars Boering, managing director of World Press Photo, joined the organisation in January 2015, just before that year’s prize was announced. It was an award beset with issues, as it emerged that more than 20% of the final-round entries had been disqualified for image-manipulation; then one of the winners – Giovanni Troilo, who had won first prize in the Contemporary Issues – Story category – was disqualified, when World Press found that an image he said had been shot in Charleroi, Brussels had been taken in Molenbeek. Boering countered with a new code of ethics for entrants, which meant that images submitted to the 2016 prize were more thoroughly checked – and were found to be less prone to manipulation. This year the issue with manipulation was at about the same level as in the 2016, he says, which leaves him to conclude that “it is still a very big media challenge”. “It’s not about World Press Photo, it’s industry-wide and we need to debate it,” he tells BJP. “It is something we feel very strongly about – there …

2017-02-13T17:31:06+00:00

New Age of Walls © Washington Post

Washington Post’s Age of Walls wins WPP’s Innovative Storytelling Prize

Donald Trump’s Mexican wall may have got the headlines over the last year, but walls – in a very physical sense – are being built between nations all over the world, at a pace and urgency under-reported by the world’s most viable media organisations. “In many ways, the barrier-building is being driven by fear,“ The Washington Post wrote in the introduction to New Age of Walls, a multimedia investigation detailing each of the 63 border walls and barriers, many of them newly constructed, that are now dividing nations across four continents. New Age of Walls was the winner of the Innovative Storytelling category in World Press Photo’s Digital Storytelling contest, an award for a piece of journalism designed specifically for the online space. “Most of the new walls are being erected within the European Union, which until recently was nearly borderless,” The Post wrote. “Britain is going further, rolling up its bridges to the continent by voting to exit the E.U. “Intended to counter migrants and terrorist attacks, these moves are not limited to Europe. In the Middle …

2017-02-16T13:02:33+00:00

Mevlut Mert Altintas shouts after shooting Andrei Karlov, right, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. Image ©

WPP-winning image “a staged murder for the press” says jury chair

“It’s a great news picture in the traditional way, and obviously the photographer himself demonstrated an extraordinary amount of composure to get it,” says Stuart Franklin, chair of the 2017 World Press Photo jury, of the winning image this year – which shows Mevlut Mert Altintas shouting after shooting Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey. “But it is a staged murder for the press in a press conference, so there will be questions. It is a premeditated, staged murder at a press conference, which arguably you could put in the same envelope as the beheading of a prisoner in Raqqa [Syria]. I think that’s the dilemma one has about the picture.” And, continues Franklin, while he can’t go into detail about the judging process, “I can tell you, I didn’t vote for the photograph because of that dilemma”. “It is the moral issue that is a concern for me, personally,” he adds. For Franklin, Burhan Ozbilici’s series made a worthy Spot News winner, and he adds that “he did his …

2017-02-16T13:46:52+00:00

Taking A Stand In Baton Rouge © Jonathan Bachman, Thomson Reuters. First prize, Contemporary Issues - Singles

The 2017 World Press Photo Contest winners are announced

The contest attracted 80,408 images, from 5034 photographers from 125 countries, and the jury gave prizes in eight categories to 45 photographers from 25 countries – Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Pakistan, Philippines, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Syria, New Zealand, Turkey, UK, USA. The World Press Photo of the Year is a shot by Turkish Associated Press photographer called Burhan Ozbilici, with an image he has simply titled An Assassination in Turkey. Showing Mevlut Mert Altintas shouting after shooting Andrei Karlov, right, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey, on 19 December 2016, the image is drawn from a wider series shot that night which won first place in the Spot News – Stories category. Other notable wins include Thomson Reuters photographer Jonathan Bachman’s photograph of 28-year-old nurse Ieshia Evans, standing in front of riot police during a protest against police brutality outside the Baton Rouge Police Department in Louisiana, USA, on 9 July 2016, which one first prize in the Contemporary Issues – Singles …

2017-03-01T17:35:39+00:00

Mevlut Mert Altintas shouts after shooting Andrei Karlov, right, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at an art gallery in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016. Image © AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici. World Press Photo of the Year, from a series which won first place in the Spot News - Stories category

Burhan Ozbilici wins the World Press Photo of the Year

Burhan Ozbilici wasn’t even working when he shot his World Press Photo-winning image – he was catching up with a friend, in an art gallery 150m from his home in Ankara. But, as the exhibition was a series of images of Russia, and the Russian ambassador Andrei Karlov was giving a speech, the Associated Press photographer “decided to do my job” and took his camera along. Standing “two or three rows back” with the other members of the press, he started to record the unremarkable moment – then found himself at a murder scene, as gunman Mevlüt Mert Altıntaş shot the ambassador dead, then stopped to proclaim “revenge for Syria and Aleppo” over his body. “I immediately understood it was a very important incident,” says Ozbilici. “Everyone ran away and threw themselves on the ground, or behind walls, or under tables, shouting and panicking. I thought running away was not a solution anyway, and decided to remain calm to risk antagonising the gunman further. I just kept shooting, changing my position to get a better angle, trying to capture this …

2017-02-13T13:02:56+00:00

BJP Staff