All posts tagged: Adama Jalloh

Fresh talent first in indie photo magazine Splash and Grab

After graduating in 2012 with a BA in photography from University of the West of England, Bristol, Max Ferguson became quickly disillusioned by the lack of viable career paths or platforms that would publish his or his friends’ work.. Growing frustration quickly turned into inspiration, however, and with that came the idea to create a platform from scratch in the form of Splash and Grab.

“The magazines I really liked or wanted to work for were either shutting down or not in a position to reply to emails, let alone give me a job,” he explains. “So I just decided to start something myself. Lots of magazines start in those DIY circumstances I suppose, with some hot headed graduate who thinks everything will be really easy but ends up finding it really difficult.”

2017-12-07T17:19:53+00:00

How to Shoot the Perfect Portrait: Adama Jalloh

Portrait of Britain is inviting photographers to submit images that reflect the unique heritage and diversity of our country and show the face of modern Britain. 100 winning portraits will be selected for a public exhibition showcased nationwide in September 2016. Entries close this Saturday – submit your work soon! We’re asking portrait photographers what goes into making the perfect portrait – this week we hear from Adama Jalloh.  In your view, what makes a compelling portrait? It’s a mixture of things – from the subject’s expression or mannerisms, the tones, the space, how the light might hit the subject. Its always interesting looking back at the results of an image, whether you’ve had 10 seconds of interaction with someone or spent a longer period of time with them. From time to time you get a sense of nervousness from strangers when you ask for their portrait, so being able to capture an unexpected emotion during brief encounters can be interesting. What attracts you to a potential subject? It could be based on the way they are …

2017-08-31T10:49:07+00:00

Breakthrough’s past winners explain how the award propelled them to the next level

The Breakthrough Awards offer an invaluable opportunity for emerging photographers – with winning work being showcased to some of photography’s most influential figures at the Free Range Graduate Shows, featured in British Journal of Photography’s print and online channels and displayed worldwide on leading file-transfer website, WeTransfer. We caught up with the inaugural crop of Breakthrough winners – Felix von der Osten, Adama Jalloh, Tanya Houghton and Tim Pearse (Undergraduate Series Award, Undergraduate Single Image Award, Graduate Series Award and Graduate Single Image Award winners, respectively) – to ask how Breakthrough has winning the award has pushed their career and artistic practice to the next level. How did the Breakthrough Award help advance your career? FELIX VON DER OSTEN: It exposed my work to all different kinds of people [in the UK]. Breakthrough really helped get my name out there as a new emerging photographer. ADAMA JALLOH: It definitely helped with my work being acknowledged by more people and them showing interest in other projects I’m working on. Emma Bowkett, the photo editor of the Financial Times Weekend Magazine, saw …

2016-05-11T10:57:31+00:00

How Adama Jalloh won the undergraduate single award 

Breakthrough 2016 is open for submissions – enter our search for the world’s best student and graduate photographers. Deadline: Sunday 8th May. For the judges of the BJP Breakthrough undergraduate awards – Gemma Padley, Lewis Chaplin and Sebastian Richter – it was the boy’s expression in Adama Jalloh’s image that caught their attention. Staring straight at the camera, the boy, who is around 13-years-old according to Jalloh, looks confident, almost defiant, and is standing tall; but his expression also betrays a hint of wariness and vulnerability. Jalloh, who is in her final year of a BA photography degree at Arts University Bournemouth, took the image on a street in south London, close to where she lives in Peckham. The image is part of a series, You fit the description, that looks at young black and Asian men in London who are likely to be stopped, questioned and searched by police, Jalloh explains. “I randomly approached young men on the street and asked whether they’d ever been stopped and searched, and how they felt about it,” says Jalloh. “It’s one of those things they have to go along with – they’re given weird, vague reasons as to why they’re being stopped, and aren’t allowed to say how they feel. This boy told me that lots of his …

2016-05-05T17:00:10+00:00

BJP Staff