All posts tagged: Alex Majoli

Photo London: Magnum Photos on HOME

“What is ‘home’?” writes Magnum Photos curator Pauline Vermare. “Instinctively, the idea of peaceful haven comes to mind. A cocoon where one feels secure, loved and understood – a nurturing and forgiving place.” It’s a topic she’s been thinking about in depth, because back in 2017 Fujifilm invited Magnum Photos to collaborate on an ambitious group project, which eventually saw 16 of its documentary photographers reflect on the idea of ‘home’. These photographers are better-known for documenting the lives of others, but in this project, they were able to create intensely personal work instead. “This project provided photographers with an ideal pretext to explore a place they held dear, a familiar and familial landscape,” says Vermare. “It was an invitation to look inward and outward. Home – an inherently intimate and introspective subject matter – was also a formidable challenge to take on; for the past seventy years, Magnum photographers have predominantly been looking into the lives of others – and seldom looking into their own.”

2018-05-14T11:44:14+00:00

Arles 2017: now open!

It’s the biggest, most prestigious photography festival in the world and it’s back – Les Rencontres de la Photographie in Arles opens on 03 July and closes on 24 September. It’s the 48th edition of the festival, which has seen seismic changes in the last few years – the departure of its long-standing director Francois Hebel after the 2014 edition, and the arrival of his replacement, Sam Stourdze, the backing of the influential LUMA Foundation, and the Cosmos-Arles book fair. This history and reputation mean Arles is able to pull in the big names, which this year means including solo shows by Joel Meyerowitz, Michael Wolf, Gideon Mendel, Masahisa Fukase, Alex Majoli and Roger Ballen; plus an exhibition on Surrealism organised by Le Centre Pompidou and including works by Hans Bellmer, Erwin Wurm and Rene Magritte. Arles also uses its might to showcase lesser-known names and regions, however, and one of the themes running through the 2017 edition is Latina!, a celebration of work from South America in four separate shows. Urban Impulses is a group …

2017-08-25T15:31:14+00:00

Magnum photographer Alex Majoli awarded Guggenheim fellowship

Alex Majoli, who was born in Ravenna, Italy, in 1971 and attended the Art Institute in Ravenna, will use the grant to continue working on his project, exploring “the fragmentation and polarisation of Europe’s identity as it grapples to come to terms with the realisation that it can no longer isolate itself from the crisis unfolding just across the Mediterranean,” Magnum said in a statement. Alex Majoli’s work “focuses on the human condition and the theater within our daily lives,” according to his representatives. Since its establishment in 1925, the Guggenheim Fellowship program has aimed to support artists and scholars in the humanities and social sciences. Diane Arbus, Adam Baer and Shelby Lee Adams are amongst previous photographers to be given funding via the Fellowship. Majoli’s career launched when he photographed the closing of a notorious mental health asylum on the island of Leros in Greece. Leros, the resultant series, his first monograph, was a mediation on the theories of Franco Basaglia, a pioneer of the modern concept of mental health, famous for having abolished the psychiatric hospitals in Italy. Majoli’s early interest …

2016-04-11T13:24:54+00:00

Alex Majoli and Paolo Pellegrin go deep into Congo

In presenting Congo, a large-scale project published in book form by Aperture and realised as a spectacular exhibition at the Rencontres d’Arles festival in July 2015, Alex Majoli and Paolo Pellegrin deliberately avoided credits and captions, bringing their individual perspectives together to create a single “meta voice”. At no point are we told who took which image, but, somehow, this adds to rather than takes away from the collective strength of the work. The goal of the project, which has its roots in Off Broadway, the first work the Magnum photographers collaborated on 10 years ago, was to have fewer constraints and therefore greater freedom of expression, says Pellegrin. “By removing the captions, you’re asking the viewers to make an effort to engage, hopefully in a deeper way, with what’s in front of them.” Majoli echoes this sentiment, saying: “Providing contextual information is very much related to photojournalism and the idea of ‘documenting a place’ “We wanted to leverage photography to create a place where the viewer is free to make his or her own …

2016-04-01T10:56:31+00:00

BJP Staff