All posts tagged: BJP

Editor’s Introduction: The Migration Issue (BJP #7851)

This issue of BJP focuses on the European migrant crisis which, over the last couple of years, has seen a surge of people entering the continent. Many are refugees fleeing conflict, with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees stating that in 2015 49% of those arriving from the Mediterranean came from Syria, 21% came from Afghanistan, and 8% from Iraq. Even so, attitudes in Europe have hardened, and photography has played a sometimes dubious role in fostering that colder climate. Upon Googling ‘refugee children’, Patrick Willocq found hundreds of pictures that looked the same, he tells BJP – “people on beaches, children crying, very little humanity.” His response, created for Save the Children, was to collaborate with young refugees and reflect their mental state instead, and the same sense of humanity runs through the other projects we’ve featured. “It’s no longer about making people aware of the migrants’ movements. They know,” says Alessandro Penso. “It’s now something else, something more personal, something about empathy.” In taking this approach, these photographers open themselves up to …

2016-09-08T13:21:33+00:00

#BJP 7850: The Education Issue

“I don’t think there’s any such thing as teaching people photography, other than influencing them a little,” said Imogen Cunningham, the largely self-taught American photographer, who in later life tutored alongside Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange and Minor White at California School of Design. “People have to be their own learners. They have to have a certain talent.” It’s one of the central themes of our second annual special issue devoted to photography education, in which we profile two of the world’s most influential (and sharply contrasting) institutions – the Royal College of Art in London and Pathshala South Asian Media Institute in Dhaka – alongside reports on the workshop approach, and the experiences of laureates of the BMW Residency, both of which require a belief in self-learning and reflection. And while the methods may differ, the student-centred approach dominates. Rather than passively soaking up the knowledge of their masters, students are active participants, problem-solving on their own and developing a self-directed practice through which they learn about themselves as photographers. Nor is it …

2016-08-04T10:54:28+00:00

BJP #7847: Shooting on Assignment

In our latest issue, we look at what might just be the photographer’s holy grail: creative commissioned work. We’re seeing more brands take an enlightened view on imagery, allowing photographers the freedom to create cutting-edge work. It’s available to buy now. REBIRTH OF A BRAND Upon joining the brand in 2012, Kenzo’s creative directors Carol Lim and Humberto Leon recognised that striking photography was the key to revitalising the French-Japanese brand. They look for collaborators with a strong point of view and allow their style to come through, employing the likes of Lorenzo Vitturi, Jean-Paul Goude and Synchrodogs to make cutting-edge adverts, branded content and lookbooks. The pair tell Jessica Gordon how they used photography to solidify Kenzo’s quirky new voice. “WE SAID, ‘WHAT CAN WE DO THAT WOULD INJECT SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT AND OFF-KILTER AS YOU’RE FLIPPING THROUGH A MAGAZINE BUT STILL HAVE THE ATTRIBUTES OF THE BRAND WE WERE BUILDING?’”   NORTHERN SOUL Alasdair McLellan has carved out a world-class career with his elegant fashion and portrait photography, fusing references as myriad as …

2016-04-28T17:16:53+00:00

BJP #7844: Shooting the Rich

When does campaigning documentary photography become political art? Probing this question is at the heart of the latest issue of BJP, which looks at contemporary depictions of wealth and the structures that support it. The global financial crisis of 2007 and 2008 has provoked an outpouring of feeling towards the so-called ‘one percent’ and a new wave of creative responses. It’s a subject that’s having a moment, and rather than the traditional documentation of marginalised communities we’re seeing photographers who are turning their cameras towards the wealthy and privileged. We’ve just scratched the surface in this issue, which features seven recent series, one curatorial project and one archival body of work recently published as a book. But in producing it, we hoped to find out how these projects were made – and perhaps more importantly, why. There’s a range of styles on display that interrogate these ideas in complex ways: while Dougie Wallace has shot in-your-face street portraits, using a flash “to bring out the ridiculous in the situation”, Zed Nelson doesn’t want to “vilify” …

2016-02-02T13:56:32+00:00

BJP & Magnum Photos: Professional Practice Workshops 2016

Led by leading Magnum photographers and industry professionals, the programme presents incredible training opportunities for early & mid-career photographers. Each workshop is a two-day photographic masterclass that focuses on demystifying the business of the industry, establishing a professional network of industry contacts, understanding the requirements of the market and identifying entry realistic routes into employment. The first day focuses on lectures from key speakers on specific areas of the photographic industry, giving behind the scenes tips and practical advice explaining how to work and succeed in their area of expertise. A second day of portfolio reviews lead by industry specialists will provide photographers with an honest, constructive and critique of existing work. Workshops will be held at the Magnum Print Room in east London. Each workshop is open to 40 applicants on a first come first served basis. WORKSHOP PROGRAMME Editorial photography How to succeed in the editorial market Sat 6 & Sun 7 February 2016 Photography and the art market How to get an exhibition and sell your work Sat 12 & Sun 13 …

2015-11-17T13:09:22+00:00

Erik Kessels, Brett Rogers and more to judge BJP’s IPA

  Would you like to have Erik Kessels see your work? Or Brett Rogers, director of The Photographers’ Gallery? How about Emma Bowkett, photography director of the award-winning FT Weekend Magazine? Now you can, via the BJP‘s International Photography Award. [bjp_ad_slot] Offering photographers the chance to show their work at London’s TJ Boulting Gallery, the competition is divided into a series and a single image category; the series category will be judged by Erik Kessels, curator and co-founder of KesselsKramer communications agency; Brett Rogers OBE, director of The Photographers’ Gallery; Bruno Ceschel, director of Self Publish, Be Happy and SPBH Editions; Emma Bowkett, photography director for the Financial Times’ FT Weekend Magazine; and Hannah Watson, director of TJ Boulting gallery and Trolley Books. The single image category will be judged by Sean O’Hagan, photography critic for The Guardian and The Observer; Bruno Bayley, European managing editor Vice; Alexia Singh, editor-in-charge of the Wider Image Desk, Reuters; Sarah Thomson, head of art production, Fallon London; and Hannah Watson. Entries can be on any topic, shot in any format and taken with any camera; photographers can be of any …

2014-11-26T23:34:54+00:00

The Dodo Effect

In June 2008, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin swapped their east London studio for Helmand Province in Afghanistan. Embedded with the British Army, they arrived during the deadliest month of the entire war – the day after they arrived, a fixer for the BBC was dragged from his car and executed, then nine Afghan soldiers were killed in a suicide attack. The following day, three British soldiers were killed on patrol.The celebrated conceptual photographers left their cameras at home, however, instead ‘documenting’ each event by rolling out 50m-long pieces of photographic paper at 7m intervals and exposing them to the intense Afghan sun. “The results deny the viewer the cathartic effect offered up by the conventional language of photographic responses to conflict and suffering,” the pair claimed, exhibiting the end result with the title The Day Nobody Died. Broomberg and Chanarin, both 43 and from South Africa, have become increasingly interested in the depiction of war – last year they won the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize for War Primer 2, a repurposing of Bertolt Brecht’s …

2014-11-26T23:37:48+00:00

‘Lost & Found’ is the theme of BJP’s May issue

Not every project has to have a beginning, a middle and an end that is carefully researched, deliberated upon and then structured. Sometimes it’s necessary to cut loose and throw yourself to fate. This is the central theme to the May edition of British Journal of Photography, which sets out to explore why getting lost is often a necessary part of the journey, and for some, a means to an end. We begin with French photographer Charlotte Tanguy, who has been photographing in Russia for the past three years, on and off, wandering around on foot, deliberately allowing herself to become utterly disorientated in order to make the kind of pictures she treasures. “When your surroundings are chaotic and incomprehensible, your vision becomes clearer,” she explains. “It is a state similar to the extreme lucidity that manifests itself in times of emergency and allows you to react appropriately. Photographs are everywhere, all the time – it’s just a question of being open to seeing them.” And the result is a set of wonderfully strange and evocative …

2015-04-22T15:22:18+00:00

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Established in 1854, British Journal of Photography is the world’s longest-running and influential photography magazine, defining the future of photographic journalism. It is available as a premium-quality monthly magazine across the UK and select cities in Europe, North America, the Far East and Australasia. BJP was one of the first photography magazines to launch online, starting BJP-Online.com in 1997, and is also available as an award-winning iPad app, as well as on the iPhone. Sign-up here for our weekly newsletter to stay informed of all photographic news.  

2014-03-12T15:51:36+00:00

BJP’s Ones to Watch in 2014 unveiled

If you’re looking for something specific, you’ve got the internet. But a magazine should be about discovery – a place to find things you hadn’t even thought about, providing new perspectives on the talking points of the day, inviting you in on discussions between the people whose opinions count. I’ve always seen it as part of our remit to showcase emerging photographers, providing a platform for new talent to be seen by a wider public and by people of influence. This month, we’ve devoted most of the issue to our Ones to Watch in 2014, dropping our usual array of features as well as our Projects and Intelligence sections, to devote a full 61 pages to 30 photographers who we believe are on the verge of something big. Plus it’s a positive start to the year – a way of looking forward after looking back in our December annual review. But I’ve always been frustrated by these kinds of surveys, which so often limit their scope to a specific geography or age group or type of institution. There …

2014-02-10T16:16:59+00:00

BJP Staff