All posts tagged: Bristol

Unveil’d hosts solo exhibition by Lola Paprocka plus talks programme in Bristol

Bristol’s Centrespace gallery will host a solo exhibition by London-based photographer, curator Lola Paprocka, whose publication Blokovi was awarded first prize for Unveil’d Photobook Award 2016. Shot mainly on medium format, the project is a photographic series exploring the New Belgrade apartment blocks and their residents during 2015. “The conversation started with my friend, Mima Bulj, who wanted me to capture her hometown from the perspective of an ‘outsider,’” Paprocka tells BJP. “Mima was born in Belgrade and lived there till she was eight years old, before moving to New Zealand with her family. I was born in Poland before moving to the UK in my late teens, so we have always shared a feeling of being stuck somewhere between the Eastern and Western worlds.” “The book combines both portraiture and images of Brutalist estates – both are real interests of mine,” says Pabrocka. “I was keen to include some social documentation in there too, to capture spontaneous interactions with strangers on the streets. But, these social interactions would always come secondary; the Brutalist architecture would inform the …

2018-04-18T11:17:22+00:00

Shedding light on the Invisible People trapped in modern slavery

Commissioned by the UK’s National Crime Agency, Invisible People is a project by British photographer Rory Carnegie that seeks to raise awareness of modern slavery. While slavery was officially abolished in the UK in 1807, the government estimates that tens of thousands of people are still entrapped by forced labour today. Defined by the Modern Slavery Act of 2015, the term covers victims of human trafficking from both abroad and within the UK, and includes people who are sexually exploited, forced to work in illegal and legal factories and farms, those in domestic servitude, and children coerced into begging, organised theft, and benefit fraud. Due to the hidden nature of modern slavery Carnegie was unable to show real victims of the crime, instead photographing friends, models and actors in reconstructed scenes. Few faces are shown in the images, but Carnegie wanted to demonstrate that modern slavery is an everyday fact of life, and that we may all have walked past slaves in the street or benefitted from their labour. “I wanted to show that the …

2018-01-08T11:20:17+00:00

Martin Parr’s Foundation opens to the public

Martin Parr has found a permanent home for the foundation he set up in 2014, giving visitors access to his archive and to his formidable collection. “I’ve been very lucky,” he told BJP’s Gemma Padley. “I have secured a very good living from doing this, and so the foundation is a great way to feed some of that back into the system.”

2017-11-06T15:13:49+00:00

Crossing the Peace Walls of Belfast with Josh Adam Jones

“People might not have a lot, but they will give you what they can. That’s true of so many Irish people. They’re a very warm and friendly and welcoming people. They will tell you stories and their lives and give you their time.” Josh Adam Jones, a student at the University of West England, Bristol, developed his project 99 Peace Walls whilst volunteering at Belfast’s photo festival this summer. The youth of the city helped him to understand the divides that are still ingrained into the culture there, and how, in spite of this, there is a warm community to be found throughout the city.

2017-09-12T10:41:16+00:00

The photobook according to Parr

He may look harmless in his open-toe sandals and comfortable sweater, but Martin Parr has been poking a stick at the establishment for nigh on 40 years, agitating for a more prominent status for photography through his own work and all that he admires. For the past decade, he’s made it his quest to put the book centre stage within photographic culture, challenging academics to rethink the history of our medium, attempting to put it back into the hands of its makers. With The Photobook: A History, Volume III, co-authored by Parr and Gerry Badger, and published by Phaidon, upon us, I was invited to the Bristol-based photographer’s home, to delve into his unrivalled collection of up to 12,000 books, which he’s used to piece together a previously unwritten account of an undervalued aspect of our image culture. The approach to Martin Parr’s front door must be made by foot, as it’s set back from a path with not a road or car in sight. It’s a beautiful house, in the halfway zone between the over-scrubbed Georgian terraces …

2015-08-14T12:53:23+00:00

BJP Staff