All posts tagged: British Journal of Photography

Bigger, better, bolder: British Journal of Photography unveils its new look

At a time when the British Journal of Photography is read by more people in more places than ever before, reaching 750,000+ followers on social media, we are investing further in our 162-year-old print magazine, giving it a thorough refresh to ensure it remains the world’s most authoritative and cutting-edge publication devoted to the art and commerce of contemporary photography. You can buy the issue, direct to your door, now. The new-look magazine has been redesigned front-to-back to give more space to arresting images and in-depth analysis of the contemporary photography scene. In addition to expanding the page run, we have introduced a heavyweight premium cover stock, alongside three different high-quality papers inside, and bold new typography that reflects the visual sophistication of the global creative community we serve. Since our last major redesign six years ago, which saw BJP switch from its 150-year-old weekly format back to the monthly edition it began with in 1854, the magazine has launched award-winning iPad and iPhone editions, collected the title of Photography Magazine of the Year at …

2016-04-01T10:56:41+00:00

BJP #7843: Cool & Noteworthy

With features on more than 20 of the best photography projects of the last year, Cool & Noteworthy looks at the photography practitioners, festivals, exhibitions and publishers that have pushed at the medium of photography in this momentous year of the viral image. You can buy the issue now from the BJP shop. Highlights include an in-depth, all-access look at New York Times Magazine’s redesign, an exploration of Magnum photographers Paolo Pellegrin and Alex Majoli’s collaboration in Congo, festivals in Delhi and Lagos, Cristina De Middel’s remarkably productive year, and our newfound  fascination with contemporary Japanese photography. Simon Bainbridge, editor of BJP, introuduces the new issue: “Whose work most impressed you over the last 12 months? “I like to keep a list of all the things that for one reason or another don’t make it into BJP , but that I wished that we’d found room for or known about them early enough to include. This growing list, along with suggestions from colleagues and friends of the magazine, forms the basis of my thinking for our annual ‘Cool & …

2016-01-13T14:31:06+00:00

June2015

BJP #7836: The Book Club

The latest issue of British Journal of Photography is a celebration of the contemporary photobook, the primary art form for contemporary photographers. We believe book-making, and the conceptualisation of books, has become the medium on which artists are now judged. There’s been an explosion of small publishers, and book-making rather than the simple creation of photography prints is now the dynamic area of modern photography. As independent publishers Aron Morel and Hannah Watson say in this issue: “The book is the ultimate space for the photograph” and “the best way of getting your work out there in a cohesive way”. And Self Publish, Be Happy’s Bruno Ceschel points out that the really big projects of the last five years were published before they were exhibited – Cristina de Middel’s Afronauts, Lorenzo Vitturi‘s Dalston Anatomy and Nicoló Degiorgis’ Hidden Islam. This issue of BJP includes interviews with publishers, designers, photographers and curators involved in book publishing. We’ve talked to photography luminaries like Michael Mack of the eponymous publishing house Mack, Simon Baker of Tate, and Michael Hoppen of the Michael Hoppen Gallery, and independent …

2015-05-28T16:02:18+00:00

May2015

BJP #7835: Nude Animal Cigar

The May issue of British Journal of Photography, on sale now, is dedicated to photographers who don’t quite ‘fit in’. Our main feature is Michael Grieve’s interview with Nick Waplington, the iconic British photographer, as he exhibits his photography alongside Alexander McQueen at Tate Britain. For Waplington, the sense of being an outsider runs throughout his work, as does the idea of family. Originally from middle-class Surrey, he made his name with a series of photographs focusing on life on the Nottingham housing estate (where his grandfather had been born and still lived), capturing in lurid colour the ‘pre-Ikea’ interior worlds of two unemployed families 10 years into the Thatcher regime. The resulting photobook, Living Room, brought Waplington to international attention in 1991. And although it was talked about in the same breath as some of his older contemporaries loosely affiliated with the new wave of British documentary at the time, Waplington reflects on his approach differently. “I was inspired by the colour work of Paul Graham, Martin Parr and Tom Woods; I liked their aesthetic, though not necessarily …

2015-05-28T15:54:53+00:00

VIDEO: British Journal of Photography – in print since 1854

A lot has been said about photography, and journalism, in the digital age. We believe in, and are part of, an awful lot of it. But we also believe very deeply that photography, and photography journalism, is at its best in print. This conviction is backed by a long heritage. We’ve been printing and publishing photographers’ work since 1854 – that’s more than 160 years. We’ve charted the monumental impact of photography, from salt prints to Instagram, through ink and paper. It’s easy to get caught up in a sense of relentless change, in a fixation with speed and buzz and going viral. But maybe the photographers we feature deserve a little more; an element of permanence and tradition, a promise that we’ll do justice to their work. So, for the April edition of BJP, which we entitled Driven to Abstraction, we took a camera to the BJP’s printing press. We documented how long it took to create our magazine and how detailed the process was – even after the editorial team had finished up …

2015-04-27T15:21:29+00:00

Come to Dominic Hawgood’s Private View

BJP

The BJP’s International Photography Award series category attracted 733 entries from all over the world. The winner is a young British photographer, Dominic Hawgood. Dominic’s prize is a major solo exhibition at TJ Boulting gallery, the respected gallery in Fitzrovia, London. Hawgood has spent all week in the gallery, creating a “3D experience” – a new floor, new walls, and the most remarkable light show to showcase his photography. The British Journal of Photography are hosting a private view of the exhibition on Thursday 19th February, from 6pm to 9pm. There will be free wine. And you’re invited. Details are here. “The winner and runners up show that an idea or a story together with a strong execution become more and more crucial in the practice of a photographer,” commented curator and communications specialist Erik Kessels, one of the judges who’d picked him out. “This made the selected works stand out from the others.” Hawgood’s winning project, Under the Influence, is an off-centre exploration of evangelical Christianity, which uses the visual tropes of advertising to create a bold, …

2015-02-18T16:12:41+00:00

Ones to Watch: the new magazine from British Journal of Photography

We’re welcoming in 2015 with ‘Ones to Watch’, our annual survey of global talent, showcasing 25 photographers we believe are on the verge of something big. To discover the next generation of photography, the magazine will be available at all good newsagents from the first week of January, or available to buy direct here. Put together from more than 300 nominations by photography experts from around the world, we’ve devoted 50 pages to emerging talent drawn from Tokyo to Mexico City. Over the next 12 months, these are the photographers we are betting on to make the breakthrough from recognition in their homelands to international success. This issue is all about helping them on their way and, hopefully, putting them in front of the people who can help them realise their dreams, and bringing their work to wider attention. Our aim, as ever, is to make this a truly worldwide search. However, we can’t yet say that it’s truly representative (either in terms of the world, or the major centres of photography). Among the 25 photographers we’ve selected, …

2015-04-17T14:16:30+00:00

DecJan2015

BJP #7831: Cool and Noteworthy

We call it Cool and Noteworthy, and it’s back again; our annual showcase of the people and projects that have caught our attention this year is on shelves now – or available to buy straight from the app store or BJP shop. It’s been a remarkable year, with photography projects the world over taking great exploratory leaps into the unknown. We take pride in championing the movers and shakers of photography land, however idiosyncratic they may be, but we’re also careful to pay due attention to the more traditional photographers to make their mark this year. It would be remiss to publish an annual photography review without paying homage to the brave new world of mobile photography, so you can find in these pages features on the secretive French collective #Dysturb, on the photographers who caught the wave of protests in Ferguson, Missouri, Thailand and Hong Kong, on the new phenomena of drone-based consumer images, on the “friendly window watcher” Gail Albert Halaban, and on Jules Spinatsch, who co-opted the state-of-the-art security of the Vienna State Opera House …

2015-05-28T15:59:36+00:00

Nov2014

BJP #7830: Who am I?

“Who am I?” we ask in the November issue of British Journal of Photography, an issue dedicated to exploring identity and expression in contemporary portraiture, available to buy and download now. We remember the extraordinary life of René Burri, who died on 20 October at the age of 81 after a long battle with cancer. We feature Michael Grieve’s article on Bertien van Manen, who discovered photography as a young mother in 1970s Holland. We celebrate the photography of Danny Lyon, the counter-cultural American documentarian who, as a 20-year-old Jewish New Yorker, hitchhiked to the Deep South to take some of the first pictures of the nascent Civil Rights Movement. And we look ahead to Paris Photo, “the most prestigious fair dedicated to the photographic medium”. The early photographs of Bertien van Manen’s family – “vital images at once considered and free” writes Michael Grieve – were published shortly after her husband’s death. “You do not need to show yourself,” she tells Grieve, “because your photographs already possess the capabilities to do this.” Over the drunken sounds of a …

2015-05-28T16:00:10+00:00

BJP Staff