All posts tagged: Danish School of Media and Journalism

Terje Abusdal wins the 2017 Leica Oskar Barnack Award

The Forest Finns, an officially recognised minority culture in Norway, arrived in the Finnskogen area in the early 17th century, bringing their traditions to the remote forests.Terje Abusdal’s series, Slash and Burn, which has now been named the winner of the Leica Oskar Barnack Award 2017, reveals their customs and questions identity and migration in the region.

2017-08-10T15:53:44+00:00

Inside The Danish School of Media and Journalism – the global incubator of great photojournalists

“I remember my time at there as intense. It was hard work, and we experimented a lot, but I also remember having a lot of fun and being constantly immersed in photography, says award-winning photojournalist Laerke Posselt of his time the Danish School of Media and Journalism in Aarhus, Denmark. “Because of the tough application process, the ones who get in are students who really want it, who worked for it, and who have the drive it takes.” Year in and year out, this small school on the east coast of Jutland has produced more prize-winning photojournalists  than any other school photography school, including Mads Nissen, whose image Jon and Alex of a gay couple sharing a moment of intimacy in a flat in St Petersburg, won the World Press Photo Picture of the Year 2015. For a small school, with only two permanent teachers, Søren Pagter and Mads Greve, and a rotating crew of Danish and international experts, the school seems to have a secret formula for inspiring students to produce passionate  photojournalism and …

2016-01-13T14:39:14+00:00

BJP #7837: Look and Learn

What does the perfect art college look like? The Ecole cantonale d’art de Lausanne in Switzerland, profiled in our July issue (now on sale at newsagents in the UK and selected countries abroad, or via iTunes for our iPad edition, or directly from The BJP Shop), must come pretty close, with its balance of the vocational, the conceptual and a dash of the downright weird. Not to mention first-class facilities housed in a state-of-the-art building near Lake Geneva, sensibly priced course fees (€800 per term), and a workshop programme made up of visiting lectures by some of the world’s leading photographers, including Thomas Mailaender’s now legendary woodland survival course. If that all sounds a little different to your own art college experience, then how about this for a schedule: “I think something very specific about ECAL is that we are very pragmatic – we start at 8am in the morning and we finish quite late,” says Milo Keller, the photography course leader since 2012. “The students have to work really, really hard – we don’t …

2016-02-12T11:22:14+00:00

BJP Staff