All posts tagged: Dougie Wallace

Photo London: Photography on a Postcard lucky dip!

Photography on a Postcard is offering the chance to own a signed, one-off print by a world-renowned photographer for just £55 at Photo London. The twist is that the photographer will remain anonymous until after the sale. Buyers can choose from 350 postcard-sized prints, and the photographers involved include Bruce Gilden, Mark Power, Dougie Wallace, and Laura Pannack, as well as 35 hand-selected emerging image-makers. Buyers will be able to choose their postcard-sized print in person, but priority will be given to those who pre-register online. All money raised will go to the Hepatitis C Trust and its campaign to eliminate the virus from the UK by 2025.

2018-05-09T11:30:29+00:00

Man’s best friend and his own worst enemies on show in Dougie Wallace’s exhibition

If you caught the documentary What Do Artists Do All Day on him on BBC Four a year ago, you’ll have an idea of what Dougie Wallace is like – upfront, funny, and very, very energetic. You could say the same for his photography too, which though it’s been shot in a variety of places ranging from Mumbai, to East London, to outside Harrods, always bears his trademark wit and momentum. Now Wallace is showing his five book projects to date at the Bermondsey Project Space in London –  Stags, Hens & Bunnies, Road Wallah, Harrodsburg, Shoreditch Wildlife, and a new title, Well-Heeled. A dogs-eye view of pampered pets, it’s now being published as a book by Dewi Lewis.

2018-03-28T13:29:48+00:00

Dougie Wallace shoots the lives of the mega rich in Harrodsburg

“Disgusting”. “Perverted.” “The British Judiciary should hold him accountable for what he’s doing.” These are just a handful of reactions to Dougie Wallace’s new body of work: Harrodsburg. Lauded for his documentation of the puke-tinged hedonism of Blackpool in Stags, Hens & Bunnies, the “total fucking chaos” of Shoreditch Wild Life and the Mumbai cab driver portraits Road Wallah, Harrodsburg finds Wallace on the hunt for richer prey. Wallace prowled the pavements of London’s richest post-codes, flash and camera primed, waiting for a suitable subject. When he spotted one, he approached, snapped a quick close-up and was gone, before they’d had time to process what had happened. Neatly, the roots of Harrodsburg come from BJP, after its December 2014’s Cool and Noteworthy issue mentioned (incorrectly) that you might spot Dougie working outside Harrods. This germ of an idea dovetailed neatly with an existing project that contrasts the people of Knightsbridge, London, and Calton, Glasgow. A resident of leafy Kensington can expect to live to their 80s, explains Wallace, whereas in the Calton area of Glasgow, near to where Wallace …

2018-03-28T15:04:53+00:00

20% off Street London symposium for BJP readers

“I’ve tried to create something different to the other Street Photography events out there, this is a kind of AGM for the Street Photography Community,” says Nick Turpin. “There’s a lot of talk about how to take street photographs, we’re moving the conversation on to why to take street photographs. The modern resurgence of street photography is maturing and we want to explore where it is going. Our guest should end the weekend educated, inspired and maybe a little hungover.” Turpin is a well-established street photographer and founded the In-Public street photographers’ collective in 2000. He’s joined forces with Observe Collective’s Jason Reed and Hoxton Mini Press to launch Street London, a street photography symposium taking place just off Brick Lane this weekend at the D&AD Building, 64 Cheshire Street, London E2 6EH. The weekend features a range of talks and events including a photo walk with Dougie Wallace, talks from 16 street photographers, a free print swap, a book fair, and a party. The speakers include: Stephen McLaren, co-author of the best-selling book Street …

2017-08-17T10:29:37+00:00

Dougie Wallace goes live and direct on BBC4

The inimitable Dougie Wallace comes out from behind the camera on 16 March, in a 30-minute documentary screened on BBC4 at 8.30pm. Part of the mini-series What Do Artists Do All Day? the programme follows Wallace on the streets of Chelsea and Knightsbridge as he shoots the images for his forthcoming book, Harrodsburg; it also shows him at work in Blackpool, and includes walk-on parts for photographer Martin Parr (who collects his work), and Dewi Lewis (who is publishing Harrodsburg). Born in Glasgow and serving in the army before getting into photography via selling used camper vans and backpacking, Wallace started Harrodsburg after reading that a man born in the London borough of Kensington and Chelsea has a life expectancy of 84.4, the longest average lifespan of anywhere in the UK; boys born in Calton in Glasgow – near where Wallace grew up – have a life expectancy of just 53.9. Harrodsburg won the inaugural Magnum Photography Award in 2016, and the series will be exhibited at the printspace in Shoreditch, where the book will also be launched at 7.30pm on 21 …

2017-03-16T11:54:16+00:00

From Botoxed faces to yapping pooches: A glimpse inside the hidden world of the super rich

If there is a photographer who has a knack for being in the right place at the right time, it’s Dougie Wallace. For more than ten years, the East London-based Glaswegian photographer, has been turning his camera on everyone from stags and hens to Shoreditch hipsters, Bombay taxi drivers, and now the super rich. Getting uncomfortably close to his subjects with a double flashgun, Glaswegee as he is known creates colourful unforgiving images that reveal the unedited reality behind his subjects. We see stags trussed up like turkeys, scantily-clad women cavorting around London, and yapping dogs snarling into the lens. Few photographers get closer than this. In particular, Wallace’s Olympus-shot images of the global super rich in London’s elite districts of Knightsbridge and Chelsea paint a telling picture of glut and greed. This so-called ‘one per cent’ is the subject of Wallace’s Harrodsburg, a project recently published as a book by Dewi Lewis. It is nothing less than a visual satire on the ultra affluent elite and their exorbitant spending habits. Wallace, who is represented …

2017-03-10T11:38:49+00:00

BJP #7844: Shooting the Rich

When does campaigning documentary photography become political art? Probing this question is at the heart of the latest issue of BJP, which looks at contemporary depictions of wealth and the structures that support it. The global financial crisis of 2007 and 2008 has provoked an outpouring of feeling towards the so-called ‘one percent’ and a new wave of creative responses. It’s a subject that’s having a moment, and rather than the traditional documentation of marginalised communities we’re seeing photographers who are turning their cameras towards the wealthy and privileged. We’ve just scratched the surface in this issue, which features seven recent series, one curatorial project and one archival body of work recently published as a book. But in producing it, we hoped to find out how these projects were made – and perhaps more importantly, why. There’s a range of styles on display that interrogate these ideas in complex ways: while Dougie Wallace has shot in-your-face street portraits, using a flash “to bring out the ridiculous in the situation”, Zed Nelson doesn’t want to “vilify” …

2016-02-02T13:56:32+00:00

The re-enactments of Aboriginal history that won the Tokyo International Photography Competition

A series that includes portrait ‘re-enactments’ of archival images of Aboriginal people has won this year’s Tokyo International Photography Competition (TIPC). The Wake: Re-enacting the Spencer & Gillen photographic archive by Danish photographer Christian Vium was selected from eight shortlisted entries to be awarded the Grand Prix. Vium, who is a photographer, filmmaker and anthropologist, made his winning work in Central Australia between May and June 2014. His aim, he explains, was to creatively respond to the photographic archives of anthropologists and photographers Frank Gillen and Baldwin Spencer, who produced a comprehensive record of aboriginal life between 1875 and 1912. At the time, Vium had been researching the Spencer & Gillen archives at the Victoria Museum in Melbourne via the online digitised collection, www.spencerandgillen.net. “I wanted to revisit their cardinal work and use it as a point of departure for a contemporary dialogue about how we see and represent ‘the Other’,” says Vium in a statement about his work. “I went into the field with a selection of photographs divided into three categories: the portrait, the …

2015-08-13T10:26:33+00:00

BJP Staff