All posts tagged: edition

Issue #7874: Look & Learn

Four years ago, British Journal of Photography dedicated an issue to photography education, in response to the direction that things were going in the UK; university fees were rocketing, resources were being cut, and teaching was being refocused on lectures and distance learning. Every year since, the education issue has presented an alternative to this limited approach, focusing on teachers who mentor and encourage experimentation. Something they all have in common, besides their reputation for guiding and inspiring students, is a clearly understood philosophy, which informs their unique learning environment and leads to specific goals, modules and exercises that are carefully honed over years. In this issue, Aaron Schuman talks to acclaimed photographer, book-maker and educator Jason Fulford about his approach to teaching workshops, and their relationship to his own photographic practice. A guiding light in education, Fulford explains the overarching progression of these workshops, and his improvisation technique within this structure. Daniel Boetker-Smith profiles Yumi Goto’s “fortress” in Tokyo, finding out the secret to the success of her highly coveted workshops at the Reminders …

2018-08-01T12:37:08+00:00

Issue #7873: Shifting Territory

In June, we brought you the latest edition of Ones To Watch, our annual talent issue, spotlighting emerging photographers from around the globe. By way of follow-up, our July edition features the work of three former Ones To Watch who have come good on their promise. No path has been the same. Ricardo Cases, who was included in our first talent issue in 2011, quickly came to international acclaim with his book, Paloma al aire, and its follow-up, El porqué de las naranjas, published by Mack. Yet he chose to move away from the Spanish capital and quietly focus on his work, settling in a rural enclave on the outskirts of Valencia, recording his offbeat take on Spain’s east coast region. The results can be seen in a retrospective of his projects over the last eight years, An Elemental study of the Levante, showing at Madrid’s spectacular Sala Canal Isabel II (a water tower converted into a gallery space) during Photo España. Max Pinckers, who appeared in Ones To Watch in 2013, one year after …

2018-07-04T14:03:59+00:00

Issue #7872: Ones To Watch

Drawn from across four continents, the talent issue returns with 16 names to watch in 2018. Having been selected from more than 500 nominations made by our global panel of experts and tastemakers, The Ones To Watch issue profiles each artist with a dedicated interview, along with comments from the curators, editors, photographers and artistic directors who put them forward. Among our pick of emerging artists are Martín Bollati, an Argentine photographer taking his cues from fiction, sci-fi and poetry to produce work that is purposefully open to interpretation. Elsewhere, Ulla Deventer’s intimate photographs depict the aspirations and hardships of women working in Ghana’s sex trade. Adél Koleszár’s intense series explores themes of human violence, providing an unnerving look at how brutality shapes both self and society, and Hannah Reyes Morales documents humanity and adversity in her native Philippines. “Since its inception in 2011, we’ve had ambitions to grow Ones To Watch and give a bigger platform to the selected photographers,” writes BJP’s editor Simon Bainbridge. “What began as an extended feature soon became a …

2018-06-19T10:03:35+00:00

BJP #7863: Invisible World

The September issue brings the otherwise invisible into sharp focus. Invisible World explores forgotten conflicts, intimate retreats, abused landscapes and remote islands to uncover the hidden realities and unknown societies behind ordinary backdrops. “As social beings, we all demand to be seen,” says Hoda Afshar, whose latest series, Behold, takes us to an exclusive male-only bathhouse. Her point resonates with all the photoseries explored in this issue: how do we negotiate our surroundings, how do we see our societies, how do we interpret our world? We need to first see the invisible to answer these ever salient questions.

2018-04-10T09:39:29+00:00

BJP Staff