All posts tagged: Education

Issue #7874: Look & Learn

Four years ago, British Journal of Photography dedicated an issue to photography education, in response to the direction that things were going in the UK; university fees were rocketing, resources were being cut, and teaching was being refocused on lectures and distance learning. Every year since, the education issue has presented an alternative to this limited approach, focusing on teachers who mentor and encourage experimentation. Something they all have in common, besides their reputation for guiding and inspiring students, is a clearly understood philosophy, which informs their unique learning environment and leads to specific goals, modules and exercises that are carefully honed over years. In this issue, Aaron Schuman talks to acclaimed photographer, book-maker and educator Jason Fulford about his approach to teaching workshops, and their relationship to his own photographic practice. A guiding light in education, Fulford explains the overarching progression of these workshops, and his improvisation technique within this structure. Daniel Boetker-Smith profiles Yumi Goto’s “fortress” in Tokyo, finding out the secret to the success of her highly coveted workshops at the Reminders …

2018-07-03T14:09:30+00:00

BJP & Magnum Photos present four new Professional Practice Workshops

With an ever-changing arts market and increasingly competitive photography network, there has never been a time more important to know how to market, sell and distribute your work. A fresh programme of workshops led by industry professionals and Magnum photographers taking place over the coming months, will provide an invaluable insight into the dos and don’ts of the photography market, and present highly valuable training opportunities for photographers at any stage in their career. There will be four workshops each lasting two days, with the first starting on 19 November. Each will address a different aspect of the business, including how to establish a professional network of industry contacts, how to understand the requirements of the market and what the realistic routes into photographic employment are. A selection of carefully curated lectures from speakers addressing specific areas of the photographic industry, sharing practical advice on how to succeed in their particular area,  will take the lead in activities for the first day. On the second day, photographers will have the chance to present their portfolios and get honest …

2017-11-06T15:20:59+00:00

#BJP 7850: The Education Issue

“I don’t think there’s any such thing as teaching people photography, other than influencing them a little,” said Imogen Cunningham, the largely self-taught American photographer, who in later life tutored alongside Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange and Minor White at California School of Design. “People have to be their own learners. They have to have a certain talent.” It’s one of the central themes of our second annual special issue devoted to photography education, in which we profile two of the world’s most influential (and sharply contrasting) institutions – the Royal College of Art in London and Pathshala South Asian Media Institute in Dhaka – alongside reports on the workshop approach, and the experiences of laureates of the BMW Residency, both of which require a belief in self-learning and reflection. And while the methods may differ, the student-centred approach dominates. Rather than passively soaking up the knowledge of their masters, students are active participants, problem-solving on their own and developing a self-directed practice through which they learn about themselves as photographers. Nor is it …

2016-08-04T10:54:28+00:00

Julian Germain photographed classrooms in 19 countries all over the world

“It doesn’t matter whether it’s Ethiopia or Germany”, says Julian Germain, the British photographer who has spent the last 11 years photographing children in their classrooms at school’s all over the world. “Each school is instantly recognisable,” Germain says. “A teacher standing in front of rows of children in an oblong space, with a blackboard at one end is the template of education throughout the world.” This universal experience is something that Germain has captured in his aptly named series Classroom Portraits, that will have its UK premiere at the Towner Art Gallery in Eastbourne at the beginning of October. After starting the series in the north of England, Germain photographed in 19 countries across the world, including Russia, Taiwan, Bangladesh, the USA and Saudi Arabia.    The project began when his when his own daughters first started their education.  He realised that, despite this experience being universal, there were hardly any depictions of schooling in the photography world. “The way it worked was pretty random,” Germain says. “If I was travelling somewhere, I’d ask people I knew …

2015-10-06T09:25:11+00:00

BJP #7837: Look and Learn

What does the perfect art college look like? The Ecole cantonale d’art de Lausanne in Switzerland, profiled in our July issue (now on sale at newsagents in the UK and selected countries abroad, or via iTunes for our iPad edition, or directly from The BJP Shop), must come pretty close, with its balance of the vocational, the conceptual and a dash of the downright weird. Not to mention first-class facilities housed in a state-of-the-art building near Lake Geneva, sensibly priced course fees (€800 per term), and a workshop programme made up of visiting lectures by some of the world’s leading photographers, including Thomas Mailaender’s now legendary woodland survival course. If that all sounds a little different to your own art college experience, then how about this for a schedule: “I think something very specific about ECAL is that we are very pragmatic – we start at 8am in the morning and we finish quite late,” says Milo Keller, the photography course leader since 2012. “The students have to work really, really hard – we don’t …

2016-02-12T11:22:14+00:00

Show and tell

BJP

Featuring one-to-one portfolios reviews with some of London’s leading photography professionals, alongside talks, presentations and panel discussions, the inaugural Offspring Photo Meet goes live in east London on the weekend of 21-22 March, aiming to establish a creative hothouse designed to nurture new talent. Providing emerging and early-career photographers with an opportunity to learn from and network with their peers in an informal workshop environment, Offspring brings together some of the capital’s top professionals with new talent eager to pitch their work, get expert feedback and learn more about the dynamics of the contemporary photography market. Limited to 50 places per day, and priced from £175 to £250, the Photo Meet will provide constructive advice alongside real-world stories from image-makers, picture editors and gallerists who have something to say, and have found new ways to tell it. [bjp_ad_slot] “The Photo Meet is designed to help bridge the gap between emerging photographers and the industry they aspire to,” says Offspring founder Mimi Mollica, who took his inspiration from festivals abroad, where photographers and professionals can meet …

2015-04-17T14:04:58+00:00

Building the School of Photographic Arts Ottawa

In July 2005, Canadian photography teacher and lecturer Michael Tardioli made a decision that would change his professional life for good. Keen to develop and expand on his teaching methods, Tardioli, who had been instructing photography at a local college in Ottawa, decided to found his own educational institution– the School of Photographic Arts Ottawa (SPAO). With the help of a group of 20 students, Tardioli (whose background is in printmaking) designed, built and equipped the school from scratch in just 43 days. “Two students became five, and then someone said, ‘Why don’t you open up your own place’?” he recalls. “Five students became 10, 10 became 15, and then we had 20 students.” It was a lot of hard work, says Tardioli, who donated photographic equipment and funded the project using student fees. “We had no air conditioning and it was the height of summer, so it was exhausting, but it was a whole different level of excitement – the kids were really motivated.” The school, which has recently appointed Tony Martins as director of …

2013-12-11T11:05:04+00:00

Archives of the future

It is certainly a truism to say that we’re taking more images than ever before, the majority of which are created and stored digitally. RAID and cloud storage services are widely used by individual photographers, but for gallery and museum archivists these approaches don’t offer 100 percent security in the long term. [bjp_ad_slot] Digital data stored on RAID multiple disk drives must be migrated every few years as drives wear out and need to be updated and replaced, while cloud storage – no matter how safe it is purported to be – is no substitute for a hard copy of an image. There is also the issue of human error that may come into play, or the possibility that a future archivist may delete important digital files to make room for others without properly looking at what is being deleted. Ultimately, no matter how safe current digital archival approaches are claimed to be, there is no guarantee that the files stored on hard drives will survive 50, 100 or more years into the future. Two …

2013-12-11T12:01:57+00:00

BJP Staff