All posts tagged: England

Portrait of Britain returns to screens across the UK this September

Portrait of Britain returns for a second year with 100 more images that encapsulate life the length and breadth of the UK. From almost 8,000 entries this year, the final hundred will now be displayed in a digital exhibition across JCDecaux screens in shopping centres and commuter hubs around the country throughout September. In partnership with Nikon, the photography giant, Portrait of Britain aims to show the social and cultural diversity of people in the UK and showcase everyday citizens and unsung heroes in a gallery of the people, by the people, for the people. Simon Bainbridge, Editorial Director at the British Journal of Photography, was excited about the latest portraits for 2017, saying, “Collectively, the portraits celebrate the unique heritage and diversity of modern Britain, as much as its thriving photography culture and the myriad styles and approaches they employ in their work.”

2017-09-02T07:09:49+00:00

Philip Larkin, the Auto-Erotic Portrait Photographer Incapable Of Love

In a re-write of a letter titled Letter to a Friend About Girls, addressed to his long-term friend and Oxford contemporary Kingsley Amis, the poet Philip Larkin wrote: Only cameras memorise her face Her clothes would never hang among your interests. Larkin, attempting a more cathartic dialogue with Amis, was discussing the various women who came and went throughout the years, partners who were often ridiculed or dismissed by Amis. Whilst these words belong to an unpublished version of the poem, and were probably not meant to be seen by Amis, it reveals Larkin’s growing fatigue with Amis’s habit of condescending him, which had come to epitomise the two men’s relationship. Larkin accepts his female partners are less attractive, less desirable, than Amis’.  And yet, in writing ‘only cameras memorise her face’, Larkin, usually so apathetic, displays an ability to be both disparaging in his attitude and decisive in his willingness to preserve these women on film. In The Importance of Elsewhere, a new photobook that explores, for the first time, Larkin’s active life as a photographer, we find a much sought after adjunct to …

2015-12-23T15:53:29+00:00

How England has changed over forty years, by Magnum’s Ian Berry

“Photography is not an intellectual pursuit. It’s about becoming a hunter – getting yourself into the right place at the right time,” says Ian Berry. A member of Magnum Photos since 1962, Ian Berry knows what he’s talking about. He’s worked as a photojournalist in Vietnam, Israel, China, Ireland, Ethiopia and the former Soviet Union (to name but a few). But he’s perhaps most famous for his documentation of the 1960 Sharpeville massacre in apartheid South Africa, his photographic work the evidence used in the trial that eventually proved the victims’ innocence. His current exhibition, The English at the Lucy Bell Gallery in Hastings on England’s south coast, hits a little closer to home. Mostly taken in 1975, Berry conceived of the project as “a personal exploration of English life”. To that end, he travelled the length and breadth of the country photographing young and old, rich and poor, city and country, home and work. Seen here, in 2015, the collection stands as a vivid time capsule, some aspects familiar, some very alien. BJP spoke to Ian about …

2015-11-03T12:51:10+00:00

The rural mythologies of English country life

It took Andy Sewell five years to photograph the fragment of green that is Hampstead Heath, and given that its “ancient trees, tall grass and thickets dense enough to get lost in” cover just a couple of square miles, it was some investigation. For this British photographer, endgame is long in the forging. Instead, he begins with “an attraction; something I feel confused about, and making the work is the process of finding some coherence within that”. For his latest undertaking, he has set about unravelling the myths, histories and impressions encircling the English countryside. Once again the venture took five years, and once again it will be published initially as a special edition book – an approach that worked well with The Heath, which won the International Photobook Award in 2012 and plaudits from both Martin Parr and Robert Adams, the latter stating that it had rekindled his dwindling faith in photography. Both bodies of work engage with landscape, but where grand, sweeping views might have been an obvious source of inspiration, Sewell hones in on the particular. …

2015-09-30T11:45:32+00:00

BJP Staff