All posts tagged: Fashion

Ones to Watch: Justine Tjallinks

It was while working as an art director that rising talent Justine Tjallinks decided she wanted to make her own images. Born in a small village in the east of the Netherlands, the 32-year-old moved to the Dutch capital to study at the Amsterdam Fashion Institute before immersing herself in the commercial world, working on several leading fashion publications.

2017-06-12T11:28:58+00:00

Photobook: Roxane II by Viviane Sassen

“When I unbutton the sleeve of a shirt/Shades of sky under my skin awaken,” read the opening lines of Maria Barnas’ poem You and I, used at the start of Viviane Sassen’s new photobook, Roxane II. Abstract though these lines seem, they possess a subtle symmetry with the images which follow, in which expanses of pale skin sit in stark juxtaposition to graphic, almost blindingly bright streaks of colour. In Roxane II, the human and the organic seem to bleed into one another with captivating results.

2017-06-13T15:15:07+00:00

Erwin Blumenfeld: From Dada to Vogue

Erwin Blumenfeld proved himself to be one of photography’s greatest pioneers during his 35-year-long career, breaking new ground in formal experimentation, developing innovative concepts through his fashion shoots, and enjoying unprecedented commercial success as a result. And yet the division of his archive – some 30,000 negatives and 8,000 prints distributed among his family after his death in 1969 – has left Blumenfeld’s impressive oeuvre somewhat underappreciated in the years since. Erwin Blumenfeld: From Dada to Vogue, is the most comprehensive retrospective of his work for nearly 20 years, is aiming to change all that. Curator Lou Proud collaborated with Yorick Blumenfeld, one of the photographer’s three children, to create an overview of his extensive archive that comprises 85 works spanning portraiture, collages, nudes and fashion photography. The exhibition, at Osborne Samuel gallery in London, is subdivided in chronological order according to his own biography: Berlin, Amsterdam, Paris and New York. Blumenfeld’s entry into photography was somewhat serendipitous: in the early 1930s, while running a leather shop in Amsterdam, he uncovered a fully equipped darkroom behind a boarded-up …

2016-10-21T11:55:58+00:00

Photoworks announce theme for the Brighton Photo Biennial in October

The seventh installment of the Brighton Photo Biennial will take place throughout the month of October, hosting a series of talks, exhibitions and events, which hope to entertain and inspire both industry professionals as well as non-specialist audiences and lovers of photography. The festival will take over some of Brighton’s notable culture hubs, indoors and out; including the Fabrica building and the University of Brighton Grand Parade. This year’s theme, Beyond the Bias – Reshaping Image, seeks to debate the role that photography plays in the politics of identity, through the vehicle of fashion, style, gender and sexuality. Three core exhibitions will lie at the centre of the biennial. Ewen Spencer, who graduated from the University of Brighton in 1997, will take over Fabrica with a Photoworks commission, for which he plans to track London’s youth along the route of this summer’s notorious Notting Hill Carnival. In line with the festive spirit, the images mounted on large billboards will be shown alongside projection of Spencer’s archive and a contemporary music soundtrack. Olivia Arthur and Bharat …

2016-08-04T11:12:24+00:00

BJP #7847: Shooting on Assignment

In our latest issue, we look at what might just be the photographer’s holy grail: creative commissioned work. We’re seeing more brands take an enlightened view on imagery, allowing photographers the freedom to create cutting-edge work. It’s available to buy now. REBIRTH OF A BRAND Upon joining the brand in 2012, Kenzo’s creative directors Carol Lim and Humberto Leon recognised that striking photography was the key to revitalising the French-Japanese brand. They look for collaborators with a strong point of view and allow their style to come through, employing the likes of Lorenzo Vitturi, Jean-Paul Goude and Synchrodogs to make cutting-edge adverts, branded content and lookbooks. The pair tell Jessica Gordon how they used photography to solidify Kenzo’s quirky new voice. “WE SAID, ‘WHAT CAN WE DO THAT WOULD INJECT SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT AND OFF-KILTER AS YOU’RE FLIPPING THROUGH A MAGAZINE BUT STILL HAVE THE ATTRIBUTES OF THE BRAND WE WERE BUILDING?’”   NORTHERN SOUL Alasdair McLellan has carved out a world-class career with his elegant fashion and portrait photography, fusing references as myriad as …

2016-04-28T17:16:53+00:00

Steve McQueen for Fantastic Man

Ten Years of Fantastic Man – the groundbreaking men’s style magazine

“By now,” writes Gert Jonkers in parentheses, “Thom Browne and I have worked our way through a bottle of champagne at the exclusive Soho House, and we’ve cabbed to Il Cantinori, a swanky restaurant in the East Village, where we’re at a table in less than no time – even though the place is packed.” “Wow. I feel like we’re on a date,” says Browne, who had agreed to be interviewed for the first time for a new menswear magazine launched in 2005, titled Fantastic Man. As reported by Jonkers, the co-founder of the magazine, they had just discussed Tommy Hilfiger and Calvin Klein, the importance of a snugly tailored suit, of how one should wear trousers. Their exchanges were, in some respects, the kind of thing you might read in any fashion magazine. Yet this moment, an editor and revered designer slightly tipsy in the close confines of a restaurant, captures the singular achievement of Fantastic Man – a revealing, casual and glamorous confidence that allowed an independent magazine published by two unknown designers …

2016-02-12T11:14:46+00:00

Horst’s High Style at The Düsseldorf Photo Weekend

Horst Paul Albert Bohrmann, later known as Horst P. Horst, is to receive his first major retrospective in the country of his birth at the fifth edition of the Düsseldorf Photo Weekend. An icon of fashion photography, Horst photographed more than 90 covers for Vogue, including Marlene Dietrich, Salvador Dali and Rita Hayworth. With more than 250 photographs from a 60-year career on display, the exhibition shows Horst’s central casting in Paris’ 1930s fashion scene – known now as the golden age of couture. Organised by London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, the exhibition takes its cue from the original London show, which orientated Horst’s images in near-darkness, with black and white photographs only illuminated by spot-lights. This is something of a homecoming for the photographer who coined the famous term: “Fashion is an expression of the times. Elegance is something else again.” Horst was born in the East of Germany in 1906. As a 24-year-old, he moved to Paris to study architecture under the iconic Le Corbusier, before meeting, and becoming the lover, of the French Vogue photographer George Hoyningen-Huene. …

2016-01-19T18:29:08+00:00

The teenage fashion photographer mixing advertising and pop culture

Fashion photographer Daniel Sachon is only 19, but in the last five years he’s racked up experience working for clients and publications like Models1, Select Models, Papercut Magazine, Fiasco Magazine and Slang Magazine. Disruptive Innovation, his first solo exhibition, is currently on show at the Londonnewcastle Project Space in east London. It features key images from his nascent body of work, including his playful reimagining of iconic photos of Marilyn Monroe. Sachon presents ‘Millennial Marilyn’ with contemporary products – an iPhone, a Starbucks cup.  Perhaps a comment on rampant consumerism and the bastardisation of iconography or merely combining two recognisable ‘brands’ from different eras, Sachon is keen to explore this dynamic.  “I’m inspired just as much by the art world as I am by the worlds of advertising and pop culture,” Sachon says. “Despite being inspired by both worlds and seeing so many similarities between the two, society seems to constantly disparage this link which I find inspiring and frustrating in equal measure.” “In this exhibition, I try to walk the fine line between these …

2016-01-13T14:32:41+00:00

Playing between the lines of fashion, photography and art

Benjamin Whitley only completed his BA in photography at Camberwell College of Art last year, and already he has already been featured in the Telegraph and Vogue.co.uk, shot the SS14 campaign for Mako, and shown work at the South London Gallery. Born into a family of image makers – his mother, grandfather and aunt have all been photographers at some point, and his other grandfather is a painter – he has a sophisticated approach that he applies to fashion, film and photography, and the juncture at which it meets art.           “Fashion is interesting due to its construction in terms of image,” he says. “It has a likeness to real time but inherently it’s completely hyperreal. There’s an element of performance that is really exciting; it allows for a collision of style and roleplay that is unique to the medium. I’m interested in how clothing can take on its wearer and vice versa, and how fashion imagery can create completely unrealistic and opulent scenarios. The fantasy of it all is really glamorous.” Attracted to “the way …

2015-11-18T16:05:14+00:00

The photographer inspired by stoners to mix high fashion with everyday objects

Having graduated from New York’s School of Visual Arts four and half years ago, David Brandon Geeting has already exhibited at Art Basel Miami Beach and shot for the likes of Nylon, The Fader and The New York Times T Magazine. He is clearly a rising star, but modestly comments that “every time I make new work, I feel like I’ve never made art before,” adding, “I also have a hard time learning from experience; I hit my head on the same low ceilings every time. I hope my work looks as if someone who just hit their head on a ceiling is trying to make art for the first time.”       These images come from a shoot for Surface magazine and show off clothes by Maison Martin Margiela, but Geeting is irreverent about high fashion too, noting that he and creative director Zak Klauck paired the clothes with everyday items because “the Margiela couture was so ridiculous”. Done at “the cheapest studio I could find, with off-brand strobes, a modest collection of seamless …

2015-11-09T14:49:48+00:00

BJP Staff