All posts tagged: Flowers Gallery

Photo London: ‘We might begin to see 3D printing and augmented reality become collectible’

First established in 1970 by Angela Flowers in London’s West End, Flowers Gallery now has two central London locations – one in Mayfair and another in Shoreditch, along with a space in New York. The gallery currently represents 48 international artists working across a wide range of media. Flowers Gallery has been recognised for its engagement with important socio-cultural, political and environmental themes. We spoke to Director of the Photography Department, Chris Littlewood, about the artists’ work he is bringing to Photo London later this month, which include an array of well-known names such as Edward Burtynsky and Nadav Kander. Littlewood has also helped predict a number of future trends, from experimental installation techniques, to elements like 3D printing and augmented realities. What excites you the most about exhibiting your artists at Photo London? It’s always exciting to present at fairs, especially if the work is fresh and audiences are engaging with it for the first time. If someone appreciates an artist’s work the same way I do, an amazing energy can come out of …

2018-05-15T13:18:13+00:00

Brexit-era Britain in Simon Roberts’ Merrie Albion

Merrie Albion: Landscape Studies of a Small Island is a concise compendium of Britain over the past few years and is an excellent visual survey of the run-up to Brexit. The photographs examine rich and complex variations of Britain that are now even more poignant after last year’s vote. Images of election campaigning in clean and tidy suburbia, protests, the aftermath of riots in London, diamond jubilee celebrations, rock concerts, a family enjoying Brighton beach, computer screens of the trading floor of Lloyds – the list goes on. Roberts has managed to capture all the major events in juxtaposition with minor situations that are large with meaning, from the dead of the Iraq war being saluted by Army veterans through Wootton Bassett to an depiction of impoverished mothers and children at a youth club in Blackburn. Contained within each photograph are mini dramas, cheap-looking high streets with pound shops set against Victorian architecture. Roberts shows a Britain at odds with itself. Rather than a harmonious society, we sense fragmentation and awkwardness and a yearning for a glorious past that never existed.

2018-01-10T10:17:09+00:00

BJP Staff