All posts tagged: Fotobookfestival Kassel

Vicente Paredes’ hard-hitting Pony Congo goes on show at Espace Images Vevey

Contrasting images of children shot in Congo and in Spain, Vicente Paredes questions perceptions of wealth and happiness, freedom and self-consciousness. Pony Congo is now going on show at Espace Images Vevey; this is an update of a BJP interview first published in 2016. “You have to bear in mind that the kids in my book will never meet in real life. It is the viewer who must imagine what would happen if they were to meet. Ideas such as colonialism, misery, pity and mistrust are in our minds, not in the pictures themselves.”

2017-11-16T12:18:18+00:00

Interview with Mathieu Asselin, winner of the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation First PhotoBook Award

“On s’engage, on va le faire” – that is, “We’re in, we’ll do it”. The New York-based, French-Venezuelan photographer Mathieu Asselin goes back and forth from Spanish to English to French as he recalls how Sam Stourdzé, the director of the Rencontres d’Arles, enthusiastically agreed to exhibit his five-year long, research-intensive project about the US chemical corporation Monsanto. It happened a week before last year’s festival, and Asselin was then showing the dummy of his photobook, Monsanto®. A Photographic Investigation. This year the project is being shown at the Magasin Électrique at Arles, and the book has been published in French by Actes Sud, and in English by the Dortmund-based Verlag Kettler. Asselin’s project is conceived as a cautionary tale putting the spotlight on the consequences of corporate impunity, both for people and the environment. Designed by fellow countryman Ricardo Báez, a designer, curator and photobook collector who has notably worked with the Venezuelan master Paolo Gasparini, Monsanto® submerges the reader into an exposé of the corporation’s practices, whether by showing contaminated sites and the health and …

2017-11-10T18:17:05+00:00

Jan McCullough wins Dummy Award at Fotobookfestival Kassel

How do you make a house a home? And can you ever really make it your own? For Jan McCullough, the process of homemaking follows a remarkably similar, even formulaic, pattern, often dictated by self- appointed experts online. She found a cache of chatrooms offering suggestions on how to position everything from kettles to sofas to family snaps, and when she stumbled on a 1950s manual titled How To Make The Home You Want in a second-hand bookshop in Ireland, she realised that, across the generations, we’ve been told how to live. We think we’re individuals, but in fact we’re merely copying others. “In complying with instructions for making the perfect home, I contemplated the construction of an identity from scratch.” In her series, Home Instruction Manual, McCullough tries on some of these different lives for size. She rented an ordinary, empty suburban house for two months, gathering her materials, and followed the interior design advice posted in an online forum. “The house I rented slowly came together… but the moment it felt like it became ‘something other’ was when family photographs – …

2016-02-10T13:47:37+00:00

BJP Staff