All posts tagged: Frantz Fanon

A Psychiatric Understanding of Grand Theft Auto 5

Tyneside Cinema’s The Gallery, alongside The Factory, The Gallery’s art programme for 14-19 year olds. commissioned Larry Achiampong and David Blandy to create the exhibition, entitled FF Gaiden: Alternative. The exhibition forms part of the artists’  Finding Fanon series, an on-going collection of work inspired by the lost plays of Frantz Fanon, widely regarded as the definitive post-colonial theorist. Achiampong and Blandy’s most recent collaborative projects include Finding Fanon Part 1 and 2, (2015), and Biters, (2014). Achiampong, a British-Ghanian artist born in 1984, completed a BA in Mixed Media Fine Art at University of Westminster in 2005. David Blandy, born in London in 1976, graduated from the  Chelsea College of Art in 1998, and the Slade School of Art MA in Fine Art Media in 2003. Their combined partnership explores “a shared interest in communal and personal heritage and the influence of popular culture.” Born in Martinique, Fanon traveled to France to fight in the Second World War before settling in North Africa, working as a psychiatrist in a small town, Blida, 50 miles from the Algerian capital. It was here, …

2016-04-20T15:47:43+00:00

Frantz Fanon’s psychology of race, in photographs

In 2015, the cross-pollination of races occurs freely and globally. Yet it is easy to overlook the complex process of identification that a mixed-race person must confront. For in each race’s DNA is a history, culture and psychology that are all too-often defined in isolation. In his most recent series, Frantz Fanon, which tracks the life of the iconic 20th century thinker, Bruno Boudjelal has continued his career tradition of using photography to untangle the rich web of his own mixed identity. Frantz Fanon is widely regarded as the definitive post-colonial theorist. Born in Martinique, he traveled to France to fight in the Second World War before settling in North Africa, working as a psychiatrist in a small town, Blida, 50 miles from the Algerian capital. It was here, in the years leading up to both its release and Fanon’s death in 1961, that he wrote his chilling account of the psychological effects of colonialism and decolonization on the native Algerian population, Les Damnés de la Terre – ‘The Wretched of the Earth.’   “For …

2015-11-05T19:31:02+00:00

BJP Staff