All posts tagged: Gallery

Portrait of Britain returns to screens across the UK this September

Portrait of Britain returns for a second year with 100 more images that encapsulate life the length and breadth of the UK. From almost 8,000 entries this year, the final hundred will now be displayed in a digital exhibition across JCDecaux screens in shopping centres and commuter hubs around the country throughout September. In partnership with Nikon, the photography giant, Portrait of Britain aims to show the social and cultural diversity of people in the UK and showcase everyday citizens and unsung heroes in a gallery of the people, by the people, for the people. Simon Bainbridge, Editorial Director at the British Journal of Photography, was excited about the latest portraits for 2017, saying, “Collectively, the portraits celebrate the unique heritage and diversity of modern Britain, as much as its thriving photography culture and the myriad styles and approaches they employ in their work.”

2017-10-05T12:02:21+00:00

Fotografiska to open a London Museum of Photography

Swedish organisation Fotografiska is to open a new centre for photography in London’s Whitechapel. The 89,000 sq ft lower ground space plus office, which is located near Whitechapel Gallery, is due to be completed in the second half of 2018, and has been rented by Fotografiska for 15 years (with a break option at 12 years). 

2017-11-06T15:17:29+00:00

China to open its first publicly-funded contemporary photo gallery in Lianzhou

Lianzhou has developed a reputation as an important international location for Chinese photography, having hosted an annual photography festival since 2005. Now it is hoped that the opening of a brand new museum of photography this December will cement Lianzhou as a destination for national and international photographic excellence.

2017-08-08T12:49:52+00:00

Grimaldi Gavin’s inside job

“The number of people we’ve had in to see this show have been unbelievable,” says Julie Gavin, co-director of Grimaldi Gavin on the gallery’s new show Fuel present: Russian Criminal Tattoo Police Files, which opened on 17 October. “We had 50 people in on Monday morning alone,” chips in her partner, Camilla Grimaldi. “And our audience has been interesting,” adds Gavin. “We’ve had our established collector base come and find it interesting, but we’ve also had some very different, much younger people who maybe we wouldn’t ordinarily attract.” It’s easy to see why – curated from the archive of criminal tattoo photographs held by the Fuel design group and publishing house, this exhibition is an extraordinary insight into the Russian underworld’s inky symbolism. Collected – and often shot – by expert criminologist Arkady Bronnikov between the mid-1960s and the mid-1980s, the images were originally put together to help break the convicts’ code and have a stark formalism, and often palpable tension, that makes for very interesting viewing. Damon Murray and Stephen Sorrell, the directors of …

2014-11-26T21:55:35+00:00

Director of The Photographers’ Gallery receives OBE

Brett Rogers has been awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday 2014 Honours List for services to the arts. In her thirty-year career, Rogers has been instrumental in establishing photography as a leading art form, both in the UK and internationally. Rogers was appointed director at The Photographers’ Gallery in 2005, and to date has led the London gallery through a number of changes, including a move to new premises on Ramilles Street in Soho and an 18-month-long £9.2m redevelopment project, which saw the gallery transformed into a world-class exhibition and education space for photography. The gallery re-opened to the public in May 2012. [bjp_ad_slot] Prior to The Photographers’ Gallery, Rogers, who moved to the UK from Australia in 1980 to study a Masters at The Courtauld Institute of Art, worked at the British Council from 1985 to 2005 in the Visual Arts Department, where she was director of exhibitions. During her time at the British Council, she was responsible for establishing its photography programme and policy, as well as organising major exhibitions that include: Anish Kapoor for the British Pavilion at the 44th Venice Biennale in 1990; Look at Me – Fashion and …

2014-06-19T17:51:07+00:00

National Portrait Gallery appoints new photography leader

Phillip Prodger, the founding curator of photography at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, has been appointed head of photographs at the National Portrait Gallery in London, starting from 01 June. “Prodger will lead the Gallery’s photographic exhibitions and displays programme and oversee the Gallery’s Collection of more than 250,000 photographs, which spans from the medium’s invention to the present day,” says the gallery in a press statement. [bjp_ad_slot] Prodger will replace Terence Pepper, who will now assume a part-time role at the gallery as senior special advisor on photographs. He is expected to work with the exhibitions team until early 2016. “Prodger was curator of the National Portrait Gallery’s exhibition Hoppé Portraits: Society, Studio and Street in 2011, and Ansel Adams: From the Mountains to the Sea, which showed at the Royal Museums Greenwich in 2012,” reads the gallery’s press statement. “He is the author and editor of 17 books and catalogues, including Darwin’s Camera, named one of the best art and architecture books of 2009 by The New York Times, and Man Ray | Lee Miller: Partners in Surrealism (2011).” Sandy Nairne, director of …

2014-02-10T16:03:11+00:00

Gold at the end of the bridge

BJP

On moving to San Francisco last year, a friend living locally boasted that his hometown had recently acquired the world’s best photography gallery, bar none. Better yet, it was free of charge and exhibitions featured complete sets of pictures by many of my all-time favourite photographers. Pier 24 was this alleged photo Nirvana, and within days of arriving in the bay Area I sought out its website and made a viewing appointment. How would I locate it? My friend, a repeat visitor, told me the sound of mournful fog horns from ships gliding under the massive Bay Bridge would guide me to its door. Dedicated spaces devoted to photography are under pressure these days. Many are in a financially precarious position, and their creative remits often appear confused and lacking in confidence. As the medium has fragmented, so an avant garde arms race among curators has spawned an often bewildering range of genres and lens-based practices, leaving exhibition audiences uncertain of where the actual photography resides. Furthermore, a new generation of digital natives regarding their handheld …

2013-12-11T11:20:07+00:00

BJP Staff