All posts tagged: George Georgiou

Time Folds for Vanessa Winship at Barbican Art Gallery

“It asks, inevitably, questions about who we are. Who we are in Britain, or who we are in the world. It asks questions about legacy, my own life, and cycles; the very folding of time,” says Vanessa Winship of her latest project, the ongoing series And Time Folds. “It’s difficult to say exactly what it is about because I don’t really know what it will end up being,” she adds.

Winship was the first woman to win the prestigious Henri Cartier-Bresson Award back in 2011, and she now has a major solo show opening at London’s Barbican Art Gallery on 22 June, also titled And Time Folds. It features over 150 photographs including previously unseen projects and archival material; it also includes her newest series, a mixture of “completely different, random formats” and found objects, inspired by her granddaughter and “how she frames herself in the world in relation to seeing, hearing and touching”.

2018-08-16T15:18:27+00:00

Roll up! Photo Meet returns from 08-09 June

“It is an opportunity to meet people in the industry in a relaxed and enjoyable setting,” says Mimi Mollica, photographer and founder of Offspring Photomeet. “It’s easy to build contacts when you hang out for a couple of days with editors and publishers who share the same passion as you.” Offspring Photomeet will return to Space Studios in Hackney in June for its 5th annual portfolio review, offering one-on-one reviews with experts from Tate Modern, British Journal of Photography, The Guardian and more.

2018-05-02T13:15:34+00:00

PhotoEast festival puts Suffolk on the map for photography

“This year’s theme is Belonging,” says PhotoEast/Panos Pictures director Adrian Evans. “Brexit, Trump and the rising tide of nativism and nationalism inspired us to explore just what belonging means today from the role of family and community through to larger global concerns.” Initially, Evans set up the festival with his wife Jo after moving to rural Suffolk, in an attempt to “bring something of what we did in our daily working life to where we lived.” For the second festival they were keen to broaden the appeal and  and accommodate different points of view. “You get bored of your own taste after a while and we love the FT Weekend Magazine and the way they use photography,” says Evans, “so we approached Emma Bowkett and Josh Lustig (director and deputy director of photography on the magazine) to curate a series of shows around this year’s theme.” In response, Bowkett and Lustig brought together over 30 photographers, including Mark Power, Matt Eich, Sian Davey, Giulietta Verdon-Roe and Julian Germain. “We are keen to investigate the theme of Belonging through …

2018-05-29T13:00:50+00:00

Çağdaş Erdoğan stands trial on 13 February

On 13 February, Çağdaş Erdoğan will stand trial in Istanbul accused of membership and support of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), a separatist group classified as a terrorist organisation by the Turkish government. Erdoğan is of Kurdish descent, grew up in the region and, as an adult, embedded with affiliates of the PKK during the complex, multifactional conflict that has crossed the borders of Syria, Iraq and Turkey. But he did so, he claims, purely as a photojournalist intent on documenting an unseen conflict for the world’s media and without any alliance with or allegiance to any organisation. His only allegiance was to photography.

2018-02-08T17:23:45+00:00

Ones to Watch: Çağdaş Erdoğan

“I believe Turkey is photographed deficiently,” says Çağdaş Erdoğan. “The photographs we see of Turkey are propaganda for the nationalist movement, or they’re Orientalist images for the outer world since these are what they want to see.”Erdoğan, 24, is a Kurdish Turk born in a small town in the east of the country who has established himself as one of the leading young photojournalists in a newly authoritarian and conservative Turkey

2017-06-10T09:07:04+00:00

Once Upon a Time in Anatolia: Cemil Batur Gökçeer’s images blurring lines of fact and fiction

“What is interesting about the way he works is that it is in part an investigation, but completely at the mercy of his own personal interaction with what unfolds,” says George Georgiou, who was one of the Turkish photographer’s teachers on a year-long workshop run by the International Summer School of Photography, along with his partner Vanessa Winship. “There is an element of accident in his photography that he totally embraces.” In his work, Gökçeer will intuitively switch materials and techniques to allow, as Georgiou puts it, “interference to surface on the image”. This accidental element is evident in Tangle, in which a fictional investigation into a murder develops as a stream of consciousness in a series of images that take us into the psychological Badlands of Central Anatolia. The story unfolds from a murder mystery that begins when a woman goes missing. After three days, her body is found in a pit of snow, her death said to be the result of a love affair with a genie. But Gökçeer worked out that the ‘spiritual genie’ was a ruse to …

2015-08-10T09:53:56+00:00

From Last Stop (c) George Georgiou

George Georgiou’s Last Stop – how he captured London’s streets

A battered old hatchback rolls up outside Folkestone Station, and George Georgiou – with a shy, blokey smile – leans over to pop the passenger door, before driving me through the seaside town he now calls home. He sits in the driver’s seat as if he were in his armchair at home; for a long time, this car was the closest thing he had to a home. He has driven all over the world in it with his wife, the photographer Vanessa Winship, covering thousands upon thousands of miles, from London to Georgia, then Ukraine, Turkey, Italy, and finally America. It has been a long journey, solely motivated by photography. “Welcome to my hotel,” he says in that distinctive North London accent. “It’s a bit like The Shining.” On the edges of the town, Georgiou leads me up the steps and into the heart of a grand, faded old building. It was indeed once a hotel, and the patterned carpets and ornate banisters remain. Now it’s private flats, home to the town’s old timers and young couples …

2015-04-17T14:09:08+00:00

BJP #7833: Songbook

British Journal of Photography’s March issue is about the long game, what it takes to spend a life making photographs, and what it means to return to a place that was once home. The issue is on sale in all good newsagents from the first Wednesday of February, or you can pre-order it now, directly from the BJP shop. Last month we featured the Ones to Watch, a celebration of the best emerging talents in photography. Now, we’ve gone in-depth with four photographers who have managed to keep going, even while remaining unsung. And who are, in their endurance, their dedication and their ability to adapt, each remarkable. Fame, or at least recognition, has found each differently, but it never struggled to locate Alec Soth, whose Sleeping by the Mississippi became one of the iconic series of the twentieth century. Now he talks about Songbook, a revisitation of his beginnings as a staff photographer on a suburban newspaper in Minneapolis. “To sustain myself creatively is to not give myself over entirely in one way or another,” Soth tells Lucy Davies. “And I like …

2015-05-28T15:57:01+00:00

BJP Staff