All posts tagged: Hoxton Mini Press

Post-war East London in glorious colour

“The East End after the war was an imagined territory for me,” writes photographer Chris Dorley-Brown. Familiar with black-and-white shots of the territory by photographers such as Don McCullin, he’d only caught glimpses of it in colour in film and TV footage. “I yearned to find an equivalent mood in a collection of still images but never had.” Never, that is, until he stumbled across David Granick’s extraordinary colour slides in the Tower Hamlets Local History Library & Archives. Born in 1912, Granick lived in Stepney until his death in 1980; he was a keen photographer and member of the East London History Society, and gave lectures on various local history themes which he illustrated with his own images. Dorley-Brown is a talented photographer in his own right, who has been documenting East London since 1984, and immediately understood the slides’ worth. “I was beyond excited,” he says. “He was our man of the ground, he had it covered.” Impressed, and keen to share the images, Dorley-Brown took on the task of digitising them, and has now …


A different take on the city in Susannah Ray’s New York Waterways

For Susannah Ray to get into the centre of New York city, she must first travel over a series of bridges and waterways. Whether driving across Jamaica Bay or taking the subway from her home in Rockaway Beach, Queens to Brooklyn or Manhattan, she repeatedly finds herself captivated by the sights she encounters – the sky changing colour above the water; the birdwatchers on the shores; men fishing near a scrap metal yard, up to their waists in waders. She sees groups of people performing religious rituals, gatherings and prayers on the banks of the river. She sees more simply being. Ray’s image of New York is utterly coloured by its relationship with the water. So when she decided to create a portrait on the city, she decided to use those urban waterways to weave it all together. “The water serves so many different purposes for so many different people,” she says. “It acted as a focal point. The communal draw symbolises that idea of coexistence.”


Really Good Dog Photography

“Being a photographer of dogs…I always felt there needed to be a more intelligent representation of the animal than the cute and fluffy images you tend to see online,” says Martin Usborne – photographer, publisher, and now picture editor of a book called Really Good Dog Photography. A collaboration between Hoxton Mini Press, which Usborne co-founded with Ann Waldvogel, and Penguin Books, Really Good Dog Photography contains work by some well-known, and sometimes surprising  photographers, such as Alec Soth, Peter Hujar, Elliot Erwitt, and Ruth van Beek. It took “lots of looking” to put it together, says Usborne, and he enlisted Marta Roca, creative director of Four & Sons magazine, to help. BJP contributor Lucy Davies added interviews with many of the photographers plus a thoughtful introductory essay.


20% off Street London symposium for BJP readers

“I’ve tried to create something different to the other Street Photography events out there, this is a kind of AGM for the Street Photography Community,” says Nick Turpin. “There’s a lot of talk about how to take street photographs, we’re moving the conversation on to why to take street photographs. The modern resurgence of street photography is maturing and we want to explore where it is going. Our guest should end the weekend educated, inspired and maybe a little hungover.” Turpin is a well-established street photographer and founded the In-Public street photographers’ collective in 2000. He’s joined forces with Observe Collective’s Jason Reed and Hoxton Mini Press to launch Street London, a street photography symposium taking place just off Brick Lane this weekend at the D&AD Building, 64 Cheshire Street, London E2 6EH. The weekend features a range of talks and events including a photo walk with Dougie Wallace, talks from 16 street photographers, a free print swap, a book fair, and a party. The speakers include: Stephen McLaren, co-author of the best-selling book Street …


Behind the scenes of an award-winning portrait.

“As a photographer, you are basically only able to create an image of how you see someone rather than maybe what is really there,” says Jenny Lewis, whose portraiture has been published in two books, and whose work was selected for the inaugural Portrait of Britain show


Wheelies, balaclavas and broken bones: welcome to UK BikeLife

A 13-day coma, four brain haemorrhages, a fractured cheekbone, a broken collarbone, a broken humerus, two collapsed lungs, several broken ribs, a cracked pelvis, a dislocated knee a shattered foot, an amputated toe and a splenectomy. After a near-fatal accident leaves you with this catalogue of injuries, you might consider a more gentle hobby than dirt biking. Not Izzy, one of the die-hard dirt bikers who features in Spencer Murphy’s new book, Urban Dirt Bikers, published by Hoxton Mini Press and launched today. “Izzy got back on [his bike] at the first opportunity – albeit with a newfound respect for safety. He continues to perform stunts and is one of the most controlled and skilled riders I’ve met. That kind of dedication, to me, demands respect,” says Murphy, whose series celebrates the prowess, passion and style of a secret and often stigmatised subculture. “People don’t look back on the career of Evil Knievel and think of him as a menace – nor do they of any extreme sports person that risks life and injury in …


Q&A: Andrew Holligan on his new book, Dalston in the 80s

Now known as a hip place to be, Dalston was then a cheap place to live ill-served by public transport. While living in the neighbourhood, Andrew Holligan shot the people he came across with a 1950s Rolleiflex, creating an archive of images which has now been published as a book. BJP: Why did you move to Dalston? AH: I moved there because a friend had offered me his flat while he was away. A lot of friends were moving to East London in the 80s because it was cheaper than elsewhere in central London. There were also a lot of empty commercial/light industrial buildings available for studios. I then spent a year in Australia, then moved back into a live/work space near London Fields, Hackney. BJP: Had you known anything about it before? AH: I had never been to Dalston before and knew nothing about the place, even though I had spent some of my childhood in Islington. I had been living in New York City for three years prior to moving to Dalston. BJP: Were you …


Badly Repaired Cars in East London

Being a car must be tough. One minute you’re rolling off the production line, paintjob sparkling, oiled engine ready to roar and interior reeking of volatile organic compounds. The next you’re a rusted up heap of scrap awaiting the embrace of the junkyard crusher. Along the way you suffer the slings and arrows of prangs, shunts and breakdowns that mark the journey from prized possession to old banger. Milanese photographer Ronni Campana’s Badly Repaired Cars documents damaged cars and the amateur repairs that just about bodge them back to a roadworthy condition. They range from wing mirrors secured with carrier bags, scrapes camouflaged with spraypaint, tarpaulins stretched over shattered windows and gaffer tape. Lots and lots and lots of gaffer tape. BJP spoke to Ronni about the collection: How did you become interested in this? “Fixed Badly was conceived when I began spotting some very unusual fix-ups on parked cars when I was walking home from work in London. Once I became interested, I started seeing them everywhere and became fascinated with the creativity of the …


BJP Staff