All posts tagged: interview

Art, Justice and Terror – or how image-makers can reframe the War on Terror

How can art contribute to our understanding of justice in a time of global conflict? Award-winning photographer Edmund Clark considered the question with former Guantanamo detainee Moazzam Begg and human rights lawyer Cori Crider at the IWM London – home to his ongoing show, War of Terror

2017-06-22T15:41:49+00:00

Daniel Castro Garcia’s first solo exhibition FOREIGNER opens

“It’s time to leave! If you must die, die in the open sea! You must not return. If any of you come back you’re dead. If any of you come back and report me, you’re dead. If you have to die, you die all together! Now go!” With these words, Aly Gadiaga, one of the migrants portrayed in Daniel Castro Garcia’s Foreigner project, describes his journey from the Libyan coast to Italy. Gadiaga tells his story in a long interview recorded by the artist and included in his exhibition at London’s TJ Boulting, his prize for winning the BJP‘s International Photography Award 2017. The work on show is delicate and sensitive, a far cry from the sensationalised accounts often offered up in the press. “We are all foreigners,” says Castro Garcia, adding that he hopes to inspire respect rather than pity. “It’s not just about respecting those in the photographs – the audience also deserves respect,” he says. “At the heart of this work was the desire to create a dignified response to this humanitarian …

2017-10-19T09:42:12+00:00

How do you speak Nadav Kander? The man himself on mastering your creative language

British Journal of Photography caught up with Nadav Kander ahead of his appearance at The Photography Show 2017 in Birmingham. Conversation quickly turned to his recent much debated image of Donald Trump. Normally when Nadav Kander turns up to shoot a portrait, the only thing he’s thought through beforehand is the lighting. But Donald Trump was different. “I was really divided about how I should do it – how to do this TIME cover justice without putting my political views out there,” he says of his commission to photograph the US president for TIME’s 2016 Person of the Year cover. “If you photograph properly, you’re talking about a coming together of two histories. A person of 70, who’s had a life of 70 years, and a person of 54, who’s had a life of 54 years. As soon as politics comes in, you change things. It’s difficult to exclude that but you need to if you’re making a mature portrait that’s going to have any lasting effect.” What inspires him about photography has evolved with …

2017-03-10T12:21:39+00:00

On Post-Production: Delving into the practices of 3 critically-acclaimed photographers

On Post-Production, Part 1: Klaus Pichler on bringing together analogue and digital techniques The first in the series taking you behind the image. Photographer Klaus Pichler shares his secret recipe for post production and his creative know-how. Read Klaus’ feature here. On Post-Production, Part 2: An insight into photographer Dean Chalkley’s workflow In the second instalment of this series, Dean Chalkley talks authenticity, why having fun making pictures is important to him, and how post-processing is a means to an end. Read Dean’s feature here. On Post-Production, Part 3: Inside the fantastical world of photographer Simen Johan In the third instalment of this series which looks at post-processing in the photographer’s workflow, Simen Johan talks about how he creates his beguiling images and why digital capture and the best modern imaging software gives him the freedom he craves. Read Simen’s feature here. Sponsored by Adobe Make your best shots even better with Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photography plan. With all the photography essentials, such as Lightroom and Photoshop, you’ll have the world’s leading tools to help you craft …

2017-02-23T16:07:47+00:00

On Post-Production, Pt. 2: An insight into photographer Dean Chalkley’s workflow

English photographer and filmmaker Dean Chalkley (represented by Lo And Behold) has a reputation for being one of the nicest guys in the industry, and when he answers the phone, within seconds his infectious energy and charisma pour out. He barely pauses for breath during our hour-long call and peppers the conversation with lively anecdotes and colourful analogies. Over the past twenty years, Chalkley has built a reputation as one of the finest and most respected photographers of music and culture. He has photographed everyone from Daft Punk to Simon Cowell, Scarlett Johansson, Oasis, Jarvis Cocker, and The Cure, and shot for brands including Levi’s, Ray-Ban, Sony Music, and Adidas. Just the other week he was photographing DJs for the BBC, he says, and recently he published a book of his work, One. Chalkley wanted to be a fashion designer, but studied photography at Blackpool and Fylde College before shooting for Dazed and Confused magazine in the 90s. He still regularly shoots editorial, most recently for ShortList, the Observer Magazine, and ES Magazine, and he waxes lyrical …

2017-01-18T11:23:26+00:00

On Post-Production, Pt. 1: Klaus Pichler on bringing together analogue and digital techniques

Austrian photographer Klaus Pichler is out climbing a volcano in Lanzarote the first time I try to get in touch. The next day he’s relaxing on the Spanish island’s sandy beaches, taking a well-deserved break after a busy 2016. In the past year, Pichler has won the first prize at Cortona on the Move for his project Golden Days Before They End, about Austria’s last remaining dive bars (featured in our November issue), and the Outstanding Artists Award from the Austrian Ministry of Culture. He has also been working on his latest personal project, This will change your life forever, an exploration of what he called the “swarm stupidity” of New Age esotericism. He’s also seen the publication of his two brand books for Schock, the German kitchen designer, both of which were designed to live up to the client’s name (and featured in BJP’s May issue). Featuring bold artificiality, wacky compositions and clashing colours, these books pair racoons with poodles, and turtles with flamingoes, and generally make the world of sinks look more exciting …

2017-03-06T18:20:02+00:00

The cemetery in Guatemala that exhumes babies’ graves

When a child dies, some parents quell their pain with the belief that their child is among the angels. Others find comfort in knowing their child is at rest. They know there is a place where, in moments of quiet despair, they can drop to their knees and grieve the absence of their little body to hold. So when photojournalist Saul Martinez learned that, in his home country of Guatemala, deceased children were being exhumed from their places of rest and being disposed of in a public burial pit, it struck him as inconceivable. “I set out to find this cemetery that I had heard about. It was somewhat difficult to get access to it; the workers didn’t really want to let me see much at first. “I was so shocked when I saw the remains of children being pulled out, not only because of the fact that babies were being exhumed but because a job like this actually exists.” And so began Forgotten Children, Guatemala City, a documentary short and series of images that …

2015-10-19T12:25:10+00:00

Cutting straight to the heart of female stereotyping in photography

“I nominated Isabelle [for our January 2014 ‘Ones to Watch’ issue] because her work is intelligent, imaginative, original and very funny,” says Eugénie Shinkle, lecturer and author of Fashion as Photograph. “She has drawn together performance art, sculpture, fashion and still life, with some shrewd feminist commentary and a wonderful eye for colour thrown in for good measure. and it’s clear she’s not just riffing on these diverse influences – she really understands how to make them all make sense as a photograph.” This ability to get to the misogynist heart of popular culture using razor-sharp wit and measured intelligence is what makes Wenzel’s work stand out. In Positions, we see Wenzel clad in various fabrics, posing as a table. In different positions her bottom, her back and her heels become the table. Wenzel’s face is hidden; wrapped in chessboard pattern leggings, she becomes a colourful domestic fixture, an Allen Jones table, but with the woman struggling to twist free from the confines of her contorted body. “What attracts me to her work is the way …

2015-09-16T10:45:33+00:00

BJP Staff