All posts tagged: IPA

Arles 2017: The Parallel State by Guy Martin in the New Discovery Award

Taking a new approach to documentary photography after a near-death experience in Libya, Guy Martin captured Turkey’s fantasies and created a series now on show at Arles. “To not learn from that event in April 2011, I couldn’t do that to myself,” he says. “I couldn’t justify it to my family, I couldn’t be put in that same situation again. The starting point was to take control of my photography, to use my photography instead of letting it use me.”

2017-07-18T15:23:06+00:00

Festival: Belfast Photo

Put together on little budget, and without subsidies from the Northern Irish government, Belfast Photo Festival gives heft to the claim that Belfast is a hotbed of contemporary photography. Many of the exhibitions on show are themed around sexuality and gender, but there are also more open-ended group shows – many of which were curated through an international open submission process, moderated by a panel of experts from MoMA, MACK, FOAM, Magnum Photos, The New York Times, and BJP

2017-06-13T14:57:58+00:00

Daniel Castro Garcia’s first solo exhibition FOREIGNER opens

“It’s time to leave! If you must die, die in the open sea! You must not return. If any of you come back you’re dead. If any of you come back and report me, you’re dead. If you have to die, you die all together! Now go!” With these words, Aly Gadiaga, one of the migrants portrayed in Daniel Castro Garcia’s Foreigner project, describes his journey from the Libyan coast to Italy. Gadiaga tells his story in a long interview recorded by the artist and included in his exhibition at London’s TJ Boulting, his prize for winning the BJP‘s International Photography Award 2017. The work on show is delicate and sensitive, a far cry from the sensationalised accounts often offered up in the press. “We are all foreigners,” says Castro Garcia, adding that he hopes to inspire respect rather than pity. “It’s not just about respecting those in the photographs – the audience also deserves respect,” he says. “At the heart of this work was the desire to create a dignified response to this humanitarian …

2017-10-19T09:42:12+00:00

IPA judge Michael Mack on the permanence of the photobook and what he’s looking for in this year’s entries

Michael Mack, one of the judges of the British Journal of Photography’s International Photography Prize, grew up in Zimbabwe and was educated in Yorkshire. He worked at the top of Steidl for seventeen years before launching his eponymous independent publishing company.

2016-11-28T11:27:32+00:00

IPA 2017: Introducing Hannah Watson, director of TJ Boulting, who will host the winner’s exhibition

This year marks the 11th edition of British Journal of Photography’s International Photography Award. It is a commendation that has established itself as one of the key showcases of emerging photographic talent, offering a three-week solo exhibition at the renowned TJ Boulting gallery in the heart of London, as one of its prizes. This year, there will be just one award for the best photography series. The winner will also receive a £5000 production grant from leading print lab Metro Imaging, a three week home page residency on the WeTransfer website, offering a fantastic opportunity of worldwide exposure; and, their work will be published across all BJP print and digital platforms. Hannah Watson, the director of TJ Boulting and Trolley Books, an independent photography and contemporary art book publisher, which marks its 15 year anniversary this year, will once again be one of our judges on IPA’s prestigious judging panel. Watson has worked with some notable names in the photography world, including Alixandra Fazzina, Robin Maddock, Nina Berman and Stanley Greene, but is also known …

2016-10-04T12:17:48+00:00

BJP International Photography Award Exhibition launches in London

Both Calypso and Hammond were awarded at a private view on Wednesday night, and will display their work until Saturday 19th March 2016 at London’s TJ Boulting gallery. The IPA Series winner, Juno Calypso is showing six photographs and a video installation from her series Joyce, a collection of self-portraits of her invented, signature character. Her work, she says, “modern rituals of seduction and the laboured construction of femininity.” Calypso, 26, a graduate of London College of Communication, won the Series prize from over 1,500 entrants by a judging panel including The Guardian’s photography critic Sean O’Hagan, Self Publish, Be Happy founder Bruno Ceschel, TJ Boulting’s Hannah Watson and BJP’s Executive Editor Diane Smyth. Her character Joyce, rising green and inscrutable, or emerging from a pink heart shaped bath or stood, veiled, in a hall off mirrors,  has been featured in The Guardian, Dazed & Confused and in the Projects section of BJP earlier last year. “Juno Calypso’s work is representative of a new generation of female artists that are refreshing the long tradition of self-portraiture,” Ceschel said in the judging process. “And in doing so, she challenges, …

2016-03-21T13:42:41+00:00

Paul Thulin’s Pine Tree Ballads

In the early 1900s, Paul Thulin’s great-grandfather settled on the coast of Maine because it resembled his homeland of Sweden. Thulin’s family has returned to Gray’s Point each summer for over a century. Runner-up in the Series category at BJP‘s International Photography Awards 2016, Thulin’s photographic sequence resonates, he says, “with a subtext of struggle and hope that mirrors my narrative sense of self and heritage.” We talked to Thulin about the creation of his stunning series: How did you first get into photography? My journey into photography started as a way to rebel against my growing contempt and frustration with the limits of language to effectively communicate. In 1996, I returned  from a stressful year of studying Philosophy in a Master’s program at Syracuse University and I remember wanting to escape into the mountains to possibly join a Zen monastery; I wanted to meditate and remain silent in an effort to really just experience the world. This desire led me to discover the writings and images of photographers Minor White, Frederick Sommer, and Emmet Gowin, …

2016-01-27T15:04:18+00:00

Culture of the Confrontation: live from the Ukrainian Revolution

As winter approached in late 2013, the rumblings of political, social and civil discontent in Ukraine was growing louder by the day. When Viktor Yanukovych, the nation’s president, rejected a deal with the European Union for a $15bn aid package from Russia, many citizens were furious. Promising greater political integration and closer cultural ties, lots of Ukrainians saw the EU deal as a new path for the country, whose economic predicament was worsening.  On the 21st November, up to 20,000 protesters gathered in Kiev’s Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square) after spreading messages on social media. By the 24th, their numbers had swelled – somewhere between 50,000 and 200,000, depending on who you asked. As pro-EU demonstrators chanted and marched, a small group attempted to storm the Government Building. That’s when the trouble really began. The wave of civil unrest flooded the streets, fuelled by a heady mix of Cold War-era hostilities, far-right opportunism and pan-European democratic idealism. What became known as Euromaidan led to the Ukrainian Revolution, with President Yanukovych being ousted from power in February …

2016-07-08T17:11:49+00:00

BJP Staff