All posts tagged: iPad

Adobe releases Lightroom for iPad, restricted to Creative Cloud users

First rumoured two years ago, Adobe has finally unveiled Lightroom mobile, its companion app to the Lightroom desktop app. Yet, photographers won’t be able to test-drive the app, as access is granted only to Adobe Creative Cloud subscribers – prices starts at £8.78 per month. “The new Lightroom mobile app brings powerful Lightroom tools to the iPad, delivering photography essentials – such as non-destructive processing of files – and utilising new Smart Preview technologies to free professional-class photo editing from the confines of the desktop,” says Adobe in a statement. “Lightroom mobile is built on a powerful synchronisation architecture, designed specifically for photos, and provides the most efficient way to manage and edit images across desktops, mobile devices and the Web.” Users are able to sync their mobile edits, metadata and collection change back to their Lightroom catalog on a computer, import images captured on an iPad, as well as work on images even when offline. For more information about Lightroom mobile, visit the Adobe website.

2014-04-08T11:29:18+00:00

Keep it Simple: Alternative to iPad apps for photography books

The concept of publishing a digital version of a book isn’t new – the first popular eBooks were published in the early 1990s and today, with the advent of Amazon’s Kindle and Apple’s iPad, the market for electronic versions of printed publications is booming. But some authors and photographers have tried to push the boundaries further with fully-fledged interactive experiences, especially on the iPad. For example, in 2011 Kadir van Lohuizen released Via Pan Am, a year-long visual diary with accompanying texts created and updated as he travelled from the tip of South America to the top of northern Canada, focusing on stories about migration. Documentary makers have been at the fore, with Christopher Anderson, Carl de Keyzer and John Vink releasing their own iPad apps, each of which attempted to enrich the experience of work that was – or would have been – traditionally published in print. Ed Kashi also chose the dedicated app route, spending close to $5000 to produce an enhanced version of his book, Photojournalisms. Few of these apps have made …

2013-12-11T12:01:47+00:00

The work of art in the age of digital reproduction

Michael Mack had a pretty good run at last month’s Rencontres d’Arles photofestival. The managing director of Steidl (BJP #7774) recently began his own publishing company, Mack Books, and at Rencontres, celebrated Taryn Simon’s A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters winning the Discovery Award and Lewis Baltz’s Works winning the Historical Book Award, published by Mack and Steidl respectively over the past year. But while he’s committed to producing more books of similarly uncompromising quality, he’s convinced there’s a future in the digital realm, especially now that the iPad and other graphics tablets have captured the public’s imagination. So Mack Books has a digital wing, titled Mapp, which launched its first successful app back in April. Figures & Fictions accompanied the V&A exhibition of the same name (BJP #7787), and combined elements of a traditional exhibition catalogue with additional photographer interviews, video clips and exhibition layouts. It was described by Wired as “an excellent example of how to do a photographic app well on a tablet”. But the review also criticised the app …

2013-12-11T12:18:54+00:00

iPublish

Migration has always fascinated Kadir van Lohuizen. “People move to different places for all kinds of reasons, be it economical, political or because of conflict,” says the Dutch photographer, one of the founding members of the Amsterdam-based agency, Noor. “The idea for this project came about four years ago. I wanted to do something bigger about migration issues, and I wanted to do it in this part of the world,” he says, referring to the Americas. His goal is to travel from Chile to Alaska in one year. “We get very little news about Latin America, while I think it’s an incredibly interesting continent right now.” But van Lohuizen faced a familiar problem for such an ambitious undertaking – how to fund it. “As soon as you say ‘migration’ to magazines and newspapers, you don’t really get them excited, especially if it’s a long-term project such as this one.” Last year, when Apple had yet to announce the iPad but everyone knew it was coming, van Lohuizen contacted Paradox, a non-profit organisation specialising in large- scale …

2013-12-11T12:22:24+00:00

BJP Staff