All posts tagged: James Hyman

Photo London: ‘Britain has some of the best photographers in the world’

James Hyman Gallery opened in 1999, aspiring to deal in museum quality fine art of art historical importance, with a particular focus on twentieth century British artists. In 2008, James Hyman began to develop a programme of photography exhibitions, which led to the creation of a new company, James Hyman Photography. The gallery has since hosted many high-profile photography exhibitions, including one devoted to the work of Linda McCartney, co-curated by Paul McCartney and James Hyman. As well as exhibitions, art fairs, scholarships, and selling and loaning works to museums and public collections across the world, James Hyman maintains a core business as an art advisor. He supplies bespoke, expert advice to both first time and experienced collectors of art and photography. In this interview, he gives us an insight into the UK’s current photography market. What excites you the most about exhibiting your artists at Photo London? We have exhibited at Paris Photo and the Aipad Photography show in New York for many years, but it’s very exciting to be part of something so …

2018-05-15T13:16:33+00:00

The Hyman Collection donates 125 photographs to Yale Center for British Art

London-based collectors Claire and James Hyman have donated 125 photographs to the Yale Center for British Art, gifting key works by leading figures in British photographic history – including Bill Brandt, Bert Hardy, Roger Mayne, Tony Ray-Jones, Martin Parr, Chris Killip and Anna Fox – to the 44-year-old institution in New Haven in the US. It’s a move that could be interpreted as a damning indictment of UK institutions’ commitment to collecting British photography – particularly as, the last time BJP caught up with James Hyman (our May 2015 issue), he said building such collections has been “left to private individuals, and it shouldn’t have been”. In the same interview Hyman also singled out Birmingham Library and its curator of photography collections Peter James for praise – yet in the intervening time, both the photography archive and James’ job have fallen victim to funding cuts. But Hyman says the donation should be viewed in a positive light as evidence of the growing interest in British photography abroad – an interest which may spark more commitment in the UK.

2018-01-18T13:57:36+00:00

Raymond Cauchetier’s Nouvelle Vague: “Artists are creators. I am a witness.”

“I’m famous here for Nouvelle Vague photographs but far more famous in Indochina for pictures like these,” Raymond Cauchetier says, gesturing to two pictures taken during his time in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. They are the only ones in the James Hyman’s Mayfair gallery that give us a glimpse of the other side of Cauchetier’s photographic career. Cauchetier has travelled to London for the first time to mark his 95th birthday, and to witness the opening of his first ever solo show in the city. Cauchetier has become synonymous with French cinema’s iconic 1960s movement Nouvelle Vague thanks to his frank shots of on the sets of directors like François Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, capturing performers like Jean Paul Belmondo, Anna Karina and Jean Seberg on films like A Bout de Souffle (1959) Une Femme est Une Femme (1960), Jules et Jim (1961) and Peau de Banane (1963). Cauchetier is still full of energy, snapping pictures of the journalists with his Leica. “My first camera was a Rolleiflex,” he says. “The advantage is that it’s very solid, when it falls in the water, you only need to dry …

2015-07-06T17:33:51+00:00

James Hyman on André Kertész in Europe

On the third floor of a small building nestled amid bespoke tailors and the nearby Royal Academy of Arts, the James Hyman gallery hosts a rare exhibition of unseen work from the influential André Kertész displayed until the 13th of June. The Hungarian born photographer struggled to gain success and recognition during his career. Unlike his friend and compatriot Brassaï, he was a poor self-publicist and turned down many commissions on the principle that they were against his ideas and creativity. He is now regarded as a pioneer of modern photographic composition, laying the foundations for photojournalism as it is known today. Henri Cartier-Bresson once said: “Each time André Kertész’s shutter clicks, I feel his heart beating.” In 1964, the American photography writer and curator John Szarkowski wrote: “Kertész’s work, perhaps more than any other photographer, defined the direction in which modern European photography developed.” The art dealer and curator of this exhibition, James Hyman, is a specialist in 20th century British fine art and photography. It took him five years to gain access to the archive of …

2015-06-09T11:57:12+00:00

BJP Staff