All posts tagged: JH Engström

In Paris: Nothing’s In Vain in Senegal for Emmanuelle Andrianjafy

Born in 1983, Emmanuelle Andrianjafy grew up in Madagascar and worked as an engineer in France before moving to Dakar in 2011. Relocation to Senegal proved quite a shock. “It’s very energetic, very hectic, very loud,” she told BJP for the June Ones to Watch issue. “It’s very different to where I’ve lived before. It’s by the sea but it’s not peaceful; the landscape is harsh and dry. I was tempted to not deal with it and just stay at home.”

2017-11-15T11:46:25+00:00

Daisuke Yokota (sometimes literally) blazing a trail through photography

We are in Arles, where in July 2016 he showed Mortuary, one of his signature sculptural installations, made up of heavily manipulated, elongated photographic forms. He had been selected for the Rencontres photofestival’s Discovery Award, though in truth this cat had been long out of the bag – Yokota exhibited in Arles in 2015, showing his almost imperceptible inky-black prints from his Inversion series as part of Another Language: 8 Japanese Photographers, curated by Simon Baker of Tate Modern. And in the preceding half decade, his intriguing, visually arresting performances, experiments, installations, books, soundscapes and collaborations have blazed a trail from Tokyo to wider international acclaim, taking photography on a journey to the extreme. In this he is a revolutionary, with neither pretension nor timid creativity. The sheer energy with which he produces work is extraordinary, verging on obsessional and driven by a desire to constantly record, destroy and then recreate. Anxiety is the fuel. “In my mind, I have an image of burning energy in continual production,” he says.

2017-10-09T12:13:11+00:00

JH Engström’s 48 hour Photobook

The blink-and-you-miss-it sale is devised by Aron Mörel, founder of Mörel Books, to play with the restraints of traditonal photobook print releases, which are often limited and exclusive in their numerical quantity. An inveterate bookmaker himself, JH Engström was the perfect choice for the time-sensitive collaboration, known for his highly collectable monographs. The acclaimed Swedish photographer’s raw and confrontational imagery is marked by a distinctly subjective approach, documenting his surroundings and often exploring his own sense of self within an existential framework. OCTOBER: Fear of Leaving mixes both archival and new material to offer an intriguing insight into the photographer’s world, capturing the experience of the lived moment. The book plays an integral part in Engström’s prolific practice – his numerous offerings developed over a number of maquettes tend to be fused together with expressive energy. Each black and white image looks like a memory, a fleeting moment caught intuitively through Engström’s lens. Collages of stark landscapes and intimate portraits are juxtaposed to reflect his eclectic style, eye for detail, and ability to encapsulate the emotional connections of those he photographs. Mörel Books will only print OCTOBER: Fear of Leaving …

2016-10-27T11:51:20+00:00

#BJP 7850: The Education Issue

“I don’t think there’s any such thing as teaching people photography, other than influencing them a little,” said Imogen Cunningham, the largely self-taught American photographer, who in later life tutored alongside Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange and Minor White at California School of Design. “People have to be their own learners. They have to have a certain talent.” It’s one of the central themes of our second annual special issue devoted to photography education, in which we profile two of the world’s most influential (and sharply contrasting) institutions – the Royal College of Art in London and Pathshala South Asian Media Institute in Dhaka – alongside reports on the workshop approach, and the experiences of laureates of the BMW Residency, both of which require a belief in self-learning and reflection. And while the methods may differ, the student-centred approach dominates. Rather than passively soaking up the knowledge of their masters, students are active participants, problem-solving on their own and developing a self-directed practice through which they learn about themselves as photographers. Nor is it …

2016-08-04T10:54:28+00:00

BJP Staff