All posts tagged: Laia Abril

Martin Amis’ upcoming book, The Gamblers

“Back in 2005, I made a list of possible subjects to photograph and taking photos at a horse racing meeting was top of the list,” says Martin Amis, who first went to the races as a child with his father. “I have vivid memories of these childhood days out; the sea of interesting faces, the hubbub of activity and the thrill of winning.” When he started Amis had no plans to make a book but, after taking a break from the project in 2009, he realised it had the potential. Now he’s finally launching The Gamblers, which he’s made with RRB Publishing. “I put together a dummy version back then, but this was a time when the photobook business really started to take off, so I left it as a work-in-progress,” he says. “I mentioned the project to Rudi Thoemmes at RRB in 2016, and with his encouragement I decided to revisit the work and shoot more material to finish the book.” The photobook business he mentions is his online shop,, which he set …


In Paris: On Abortion by Laia Abril

Laia Abril is no stranger to themes of distress. Bulimia, coping with the death of a child, the asexual community, virtual sex-performer couples – these are all topics that the Barcelona-based photographer has explored and attempted to demystify with her multi-layered, story-based practice. The subjects she tackles are complex and provocative, but ones she is able to connect with by way of female empathy, “where I can be involved emotionally”, she says.


#BJP 7859: Female Gaze

“Photography is an expression of power,” writes Charlotte Jansen in our cover feature this May. “The photographic act is often viewed as an assertion of masculine dominance; a predatory point-and-shoot action.” She argues that social media and the sheer power of the number of women getting behind the camera is changing all that, and affecting how we see things. Though it’s a contentious issue, Jansen confident that the female gaze is different to the male – that “they see the world differently – in just as much colour and nuance. We are beginning to see that world, everywhere we look.” Is she right? One magazine issue isn’t big enough to answer – but we have followed up her hypothesis by interviewing three women about their work. Endia Beal taps into the unwritten codes of the corporate ‘look’ in her work Am I What You’re Looking For?, for example, interrogating what it means to look ‘professional’ and the extent to which black women can fit those maxims. “At Yale University, I found myself in a place of …


BJP Staff