All posts tagged: London

Shedding light on the Invisible People trapped in modern slavery

Commissioned by the UK’s National Crime Agency, Invisible People is a project by British photographer Rory Carnegie that seeks to raise awareness of modern slavery. While slavery was officially abolished in the UK in 1807, the government estimates that tens of thousands of people are still entrapped by forced labour today. Defined by the Modern Slavery Act of 2015, the term covers victims of human trafficking from both abroad and within the UK, and includes people who are sexually exploited, forced to work in illegal and legal factories and farms, those in domestic servitude, and children coerced into begging, organised theft, and benefit fraud. Due to the hidden nature of modern slavery Carnegie was unable to show real victims of the crime, instead photographing friends, models and actors in reconstructed scenes. Few faces are shown in the images, but Carnegie wanted to demonstrate that modern slavery is an everyday fact of life, and that we may all have walked past slaves in the street or benefitted from their labour. “I wanted to show that the …

2018-01-08T11:20:17+00:00

Alone Together with Aristotle Roufanis

The overwhelming sense of being surrounded by people yet feeling alone among them is a well documented facet of city life. And even if you are among the 46 percent of the world’s population living in a rural environment, you’ll be familiar with the emblematic image of urban disconnection in which tower blocks loom over bustling streets filled with scurrying figures. But what happens when the day is over and each individual retreats into their home for a moment of calm after the storm? London-based photographer Aristotle Roufanis is fascinated by this experience of collective solitude. Trained as a civil engineer, he has an affinity for the urban structures that characterise major cities all over the world.

2017-11-01T15:07:16+00:00

Hassan Hajjaj brings colour to Somerset House

“If you’ve been to Morocco I think you’ll understand that we’re a very colourful country, a colourful people. We see every colour being worn. In Morocco that there is the clash of colours and an attitude not to be scared of colours,” says Hassan Hajjaj. His latest exhibition, La Caravane, is about to launch at Somerset House, the first display for the British-Moroccan photographer in London in seven years. His work reflects on identity and culture, which has featured as a big part of his life and work since moving to the UK from a small port town in Morocco aged just 13.

2017-09-28T17:03:29+00:00

Helping refugees starts in London with Giles Duley’s interactive exhibition

“The exhibition just becomes this transition point. There will be new artwork created by the exhibition. I think that’s exciting: it means it becomes alive. These often tragic stories will continue living in other forms, whether through painting or through music, so it’s about making the exhibition a place of life and a celebration of that life,” says Giles Duley, the photographer who has spent months travelling Europe and the Middle East to document the refugee crisis with UNHCR. Taking images from his photobook, I Can Only Tell You What I See, the display will feature artists in residence, a soundscape from Massive Attack and will host an evening supper so as visitors can sit and discuss the work and the wider problems surrounding the refugee crisis.

2017-11-06T15:12:13+00:00

Homer Sykes’ social commentary, from Lewisham riots to Burberry shows

“I believe that the great strength photography has, and in particular documentary photography, is content. So much of what is published today, seems to me to be content less. I hope my photography illuminates and resonates with viewers and tells how British society was. And, of my more recent work, of how society is,” says Homer Sykes. he has been photographing British society for five decades, including major social and political events, such as The Battle of Lewisham. Now, some of his work is set to be featured in a Burberry show this month.

2017-09-15T14:33:34+00:00

Emily Stein shoots musical youth for Stella McCartney’s new kids’ range

“Music is a language for all humans; it gets under your skin and brings out and expresses strong emotions,” says Emily Stein, whose latest commission took her to a primary school in North London, where she photographed young children for Stella McCartney’s Kid’s fashion range

2017-09-12T12:14:17+00:00

BJP Staff