All posts tagged: Martin Parr

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BJP’s The Food Issue is out now!

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Food is big business right now, from esoteric street food diners to upscale Michelin restaurants, backed up by a wealth of imagery online, in magazines, in cook books and even in galleries. A recurring theme in art history, it’s also a favourite with advertisers, and a key insight into cultural mores. Food, like photography, can be high art and pop culture, aesthetically driven and plainly utilitarian. This issue, we showcase an extended collection of Martin Parr’s famed food photography. Described as “a chronicler of our age”, and known for his character-filled, satirical approach to documenting modern society, Parr believes food has a great social history: “When I started, it wasn’t really being explored. Now we all photograph what we eat, all the time.” Parr’s inimitable relationship with food is the subject of his recently published book Real Food, a compendium of his greatest nosh shots taken everywhere from Britain to Sri Lanka, including everything from buttered bread to rotting fruit. We also feature Per-Anders Jörgensen’s project with Michelin-star chef Konstantin Filippou, which captures the chef ’s sensitivity to …

2016-11-08T15:50:36+00:00

George Melly (c) Brian Griffin

Meet the experts: Offspring returns to east London

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Martin Parr is the headline speaker as Offspring Photo Meet returns to east London later this month for its third – and most ambitious – edition yet. Its new venue at Space Studios in Hackney will host two days of talks, seminars, networking events and portfolio reviews with industry experts, kicking off on 16 May (ahead of Photo London art fair, which runs 19-22 May) with a workshop led by legendary portrait photographer Brian Griffin, and finishing off in the evening with Parr’s ‘Photobiography’. The following day concludes with Gary Cohen’s Photo Quiz, prizes for the best portfolios, and a party. Portfolio sessions run throughout the event from 10am to 6pm on both Monday and Tuesday, with experts drawn from the worlds of editorial, commercial and fine art practice. Reviewers include Andrew Sanigar, commissioning editor for Thames & Hudson books, Aine Donovan, production director and partner at BBH, Kate Edwards, picture editor at The Guardian Weekend Magazine, gallery director Katrin Weber of Galerie f5,6 in Munich, curators Kim Knopper (Foam), Karen McQuaid (The Photographers’ Gallery) …

2016-05-05T10:40:22+00:00

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BJP #7845: The Icons Issue

What goes into creating an icon? Our latest issue scrutinises the muses, photographers and designers that go into creating unmistakable images that speak to the culture of the time – from early 20th century Soviet agitprop to a working-class lad from east London who somehow became one of the most recognisable faces on the planet. BRAND BECKHAM: THE MAKING OF A MODERN ICON “He makes it look so simple…but believe me, it is not.” – Graham Taylor “He is such a big celebrity, football is only a small part.” – Sir Alex Ferguson “It is rare a man can be that tough on the field and also have his own line of underwear.” – President Barack Obama For most figures of popular culture, the acute gaze of the lens is part of the job – to be captured for public consumption, to create a personal iconography that relates to your art. We expect our musicians, our artists and our actors to transform themselves, we demand a visual flair. But from a midfielder from Leytonstone? Not …

2016-02-26T15:59:18+00:00

Txema Salvans’ clandestine photos of sex workers waiting for clients on the side of Spanish highways

Txema Salvans’ book, The Waiting Game (published last year by RM), is a series of photographs of sex workers waiting for clients on the margins of highways in contemporary Spain. The images are both formal and astonishingly relaxed, and it is this mix that has impressed Martin Parr, who wrote the introduction to the book and nominated Salvans for our Ones to Watch issue in January 2014. A typical image shows a woman waiting for a client in the middle of a rural crossroads under a hazy, sun-seared sky. Orderly lines of trees stretch off on each side, but they are dusty, too, like the woman who stares straight down the road towards something we don’t see – the client. The places where the women sit play a major role but, like the client, the places where they perform their sex acts are missing. This absence gives the project much of its power – a prurient power, as is the nature of most projects on prostitution, but a power nonetheless. It’s the same power apparent in Mishka Henner’s No Man’s …

2015-08-24T11:59:37+00:00

His Excellency Nigel Haywood CVO, Governor of the Falkland Islands, Government House, Stanley

Images from the faded and forgotten last outposts of the British Empire

For six years, Bath-based photographer Jon Tonks worked on a long-term personal project, culminating in the book Empire, published in December 2013 by Dewi Lewis. He travelled to a series of remote British Overseas Territories in the South Atlantic Ocean, which included St Helena, Ascension Island, Tristan da Cunha and the Falkland Islands, documenting the people and places from these last remaining pockets of the empire. “On each of the islands, I would spend the first week not taking many pictures, discovering who and what was most interesting, and getting to know people so they would understand why I was there,” he says. “This was particularly important on Tristan da Cunha, a remote British territory in the South Atlantic with a population of 259. They were a little shy and wary of random people turning up on their island with a camera.” Tonks would drive around the islands looking for locations to shoot, and arranged times to take people’s portraits. Yet within this self-imposed structure, he also allowed himself to record what he stumbled across by chance. “Studying photojournalism …

2015-08-28T13:36:39+00:00

GB. England. Bristol. Martin Parr's study. 2009.

The photobook according to Parr

He may look harmless in his open-toe sandals and comfortable sweater, but Martin Parr has been poking a stick at the establishment for nigh on 40 years, agitating for a more prominent status for photography through his own work and all that he admires. For the past decade, he’s made it his quest to put the book centre stage within photographic culture, challenging academics to rethink the history of our medium, attempting to put it back into the hands of its makers. With The Photobook: A History, Volume III, co-authored by Parr and Gerry Badger, and published by Phaidon, upon us, I was invited to the Bristol-based photographer’s home, to delve into his unrivalled collection of up to 12,000 books, which he’s used to piece together a previously unwritten account of an undervalued aspect of our image culture. The approach to Martin Parr’s front door must be made by foot, as it’s set back from a path with not a road or car in sight. It’s a beautiful house, in the halfway zone between the over-scrubbed Georgian terraces …

2015-08-14T12:53:23+00:00

BJP Staff