All posts tagged: Marton Perlaki

Posturing – a new vision of the body in fashion

Fashion photography is changing – as Holly Hay and Shonagh Marshall, co-curators of a new three-part project entitled Posturing: Photographing the Body in Fashion, will attest. In November 2017, the pair held a London exhibition which placed 42 framed photographs and six magazine shoots in a west London space. It called into question both the function of this branch of contemporary image-making and the changing role of the figure in fashion imagery, placing work by Johnny Dufort, Marton Perlaki, Charlie Engman, Brianna Capozzi and others side by side. The show was followed by a specially commissioned film by artist Coco Capitán, Learning to Transcend the Physical Barrier That Owning a Body Implies, examining the respective practices of a choreographer, an artist and the founder of a traditional film-based darkroom, interrogating physical selfhood in all of its guises. This month, they launch the third part – a book created with Self Publish, Be Happy, in which photographers, stylists, editors and set designers respond to ideas about the body in fashion.

2018-04-03T14:09:01+00:00

Any Answers: Marton Perlaki – “Photography is a therapy for the mind”

Marton Perlaki is part of Ones to Watch, our annual Talent issue where we scour the globe for the next generation of talented image-makers set to dominate the industry. His image, from the series ELEMER, graces the cover, and this week he’s taking over our Instagram with daily snapshots and outtakes. Follow him at @martonperlaki. When was the first time you became aware of photography? How old were you? What is the primary reason you became a photographer?  My first encounter with photography was at Grammar School. I was probably around 16 years old. I originally wanted to major in drawing and painting, but the year I got admitted, the Catholic church repossessed the school, so I had no choice but to take up religious studies instead. A friend of mine then encouraged me to enter a photography school and I did. It wasn’t love at first sight. I really hated all the technical aspects of photography. I felt it distracted me from focusing on the subject I wanted to capture. It sounds a little over-romanticised, but …

2016-05-05T12:27:15+00:00

BJP Staff