All posts tagged: migration

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Daniel Castro Garcia’s first solo exhibition FOREIGNER opens

“It’s time to leave! If you must die, die in the open sea! You must not return. If any of you come back you’re dead. If any of you come back and report me, you’re dead. If you have to die, you die all together! Now go!” With these words, Aly Gadiaga, one of the migrants portrayed in Daniel Castro Garcia’s Foreigner project, describes his journey from the Libyan coast to Italy. Gadiaga tells his story in a long interview recorded by the artist and included in his exhibition at London’s TJ Boulting, his prize for winning the International Photography Award 2017. The work on show is delicate and sensitive, a far cry from the sensationalised accounts often offered up in the press. “We are all foreigners,” says Castro Garcia, adding that he hopes to inspire respect rather than pity. “It’s not just about respecting those in the photographs – the audience also deserves respect,” he says. “At the heart of this work was the desire to create a dignified response to this humanitarian crisis, …

2017-03-20T15:23:30+00:00

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Donate to the ACLU, get our Migration issue free of charge

In September 2016, BJP published a special issue focused on the European migrant crisis which, over the last couple of years, has seen a surge of people entering the continent. Many are refugees fleeing conflict, with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees stating that in 2015 49% of those arriving from the Mediterranean came from Syria, 21% came from Afghanistan, and 8% from Iraq. Even so, attitudes in Europe have hardened, and photography has played a sometimes dubious role in fostering that colder climate. We interviewed image-makers such as Sam Ivin, whose defaced portraits reflect the sense of abandonment among his subjects, migrants seeking refuge in the UK; we also spoke with Patrick Willocq about his work for Save the Children, which aimed to help child refugees in two African camps express their thoughts and experiences. This issue also included interviews with Alessandro Penso, David Molina Gadea, Seba Kurtis, Daniel Castro Garcia and Dario Mitidieri on their work with migrants. In light of recent events we are offering free digital copies of this issue, …

2017-02-07T12:41:20+00:00

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Editor’s Introduction: The Migration Issue (BJP #7851)

BJP

This issue of BJP focuses on the European migrant crisis which, over the last couple of years, has seen a surge of people entering the continent. Many are refugees fleeing conflict, with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees stating that in 2015 49% of those arriving from the Mediterranean came from Syria, 21% came from Afghanistan, and 8% from Iraq. Even so, attitudes in Europe have hardened, and photography has played a sometimes dubious role in fostering that colder climate. Upon Googling ‘refugee children’, Patrick Willocq found hundreds of pictures that looked the same, he tells BJP – “people on beaches, children crying, very little humanity.” His response, created for Save the Children, was to collaborate with young refugees and reflect their mental state instead, and the same sense of humanity runs through the other projects we’ve featured. “It’s no longer about making people aware of the migrants’ movements. They know,” says Alessandro Penso. “It’s now something else, something more personal, something about empathy.” In taking this approach, these photographers open themselves up to …

2016-09-08T13:21:33+00:00

Still from the film Pumzi, 2009, written & directed by Wanuri Kahui

The Malian festival celebrating the diversity and vitality of African photography

Bamako Encounters, set up primarily to showcase African photography, had to wait a long time to celebrate its tenth edition. The festivities were initially scheduled for autumn 2013 – 20 years after French photographer Françoise Huguier began the initiative in the Malian capital. But in January 2012, insurgent groups began fighting for the independence of the Azawad region. Within two months, President Amadou Toumani Touré had been ousted but the rebels splintered as soon as they had declared victory. Islamist factions prevailed, imposing strict Sharia law in the region. Unable to bring the conflict to an end on its own, the Malian government called for foreign military support. France, once the colonial power, controversially got involved. Its forces rapidly regained control but guerilla attacks continued for months before a first peace deal was signed in June 2013. That agreement didn’t last but a fragile new accord was signed in June this year. The unrest prevented the Bamako Encounters team from staging the event, but this year they decided to take advantage of what looks like a more enduring …

2015-11-04T12:59:01+00:00

BJP Staff