All posts tagged: MoMA

Louise Dahl-Wolfe’s definitions of modern style

100 works by legendary fashion and portrait photographer Louise Dahl-Wolfe are going on show at The Fashion and Textile Museum from 20 October-21 January 2018. A Style Of Her Own features over 100 photographs shot from 1931-59, celebrating work that helped define the image of the modern, independent woman, and inspired photographers such as Richard Avedon and Irving Penn. Born in San Francisco in 1895 to Norwegian parents, Dahl-Wolfe studied art history and design at the San Francisco Art Institute, taking up photography in 1921 and going professional in 1930 after meeting Edward Weston and Dorothea Lange. A leading contributor to Harper’s Bazaar between 1936 and 1958 (where she worked extensively with influential editor Carmel Snow, fashion director Diana Vreeland, and designer Alexey Brodovitch), Dahl-Wolfe is credited with having invented the idea of the ‘supermodel’, and creating distinctive styles for models such as Suzy Parker, Jean Patchett, Barbara Mullen, Mary Jane Russell and Evelyn Tripp. She is said to have kickstarted actress Lauren Bacall’s Hollywood career, after shooting her for a Bazaar cover in 1943.

2017-10-17T13:09:57+00:00

Any Answers: Quentin Bajac

The Parisian curator Quentin Bajac has spent the past two decades working in three of the world’s leading cultural destinations – starting out at the Musée d’Orsay, he moved to Centre Pompidou, and then the most coveted post of all, chief curator of photography at MoMA in New York. Here he shares his insights into photography and life with BJP editorial director Simon Bainbridge

2017-09-29T10:13:05+00:00

#BJP 7864: The Portrait Issue

The Portrait Issue returns this September just as The British Journal of Photography launches the return of Portrait of Britain, which will once again appear on digital JCDecaux screens across the country, in partnership with photography giant Nikon. Portraits have a rare capacity to capture a person, family and community in a way that reshapes a narrative or empowers an entire group of people. Each photoseries in this issue manages to shed new light on an individual or group and move beyond stereotypes to find a more honest truth – whether with a Roma group in the south of France, or a working class neighbourhood in The Netherlands.

2017-09-05T16:58:53+00:00

Show: Ina Jang’s Utopia

“When I started researching the pornographic visuals, it hit me that there’s a clear formula in the way women are portrayed in them,” says Ina Jang. “I printed out some of the images, cut out the body figures and photographed them. From there, I kept making images with similar positions.”

2017-06-28T14:49:57+00:00

Josef Albers’ little-known photocollages on show at MoMA

When Josef Albers died in 1976, the Bauhaus teacher was famous for his Homage to the Square series and his 1963 book Interaction of Color. Few knew that he had also been a modernist photographer, shooting with a hand-held Leica from 1928-32, and making a series of photocollages. When Albers and his wife, Anni, fled Nazi Germany for America in 1933, they could take only a few possessions. Anni’s father shipped over several boxes of their belongings the following year, but Albers’ Bauhaus photographs were not seen again until after his death, when Anni took Nicholas Fox Weber, executive director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, to a locked basement store near the Yale University Art Gallery. In 1988, the Museum of Modern Art hosted a modest show of 38 of the photographs. Now, four decades after their discovery, the entire collection of 70 photocollages have been published in a book – One and One Is Four: The Bauhaus Photocollages of Josef Albers – by MoMA. An exhibition of 16 of the works is on display …

2017-01-09T15:27:41+00:00

BJP Staff