All posts tagged: music photography

Lost in Music: the story of dance music in 500 images

This Friday, theprintspace are putting on a party. Lost in Music is a major exhibition of 500 photographs that document the history of dance music, from the early rumblings of DIY DJ nights to the behemoth that is modern club culture. In conjunction with PYMCA, the world’s largest youth culture picture agency, the Shoreditch photographic pro-lab hopes to create a visual story that includes the full breadth of the movement, including professional photographers as well as personal snapshots from club-goers and DJs. Photographers being exhibited include Normski, Dean Chalkley and Dougie Wallace. The exhibition will tour the UK starting from February, but on the 4th of December, theprintspace are hosting a club night at Village Underground – the venue will be plastered with paraphenalia from various eras, hundreds of clubgoers and of course, the photographs. Recruiting the likes of Dean Chalkley, Gavin Mills and the legendary Danny Rampling to man the decks, the aim is to present music photography in the most natural, inevitable setting: the club. I went down to theprintspace offices to find out …

2015-12-03T11:26:47+00:00

How to dance at a heavy metal music festival

Danish photojournalist Jacob Ehrbahn has covered a range of complex and challenging subject matter, from his award-winning Daily Life series – which followed the humdrum poverty of the American Rust Belt community of Youngstown, Ohio – to the Earthquake Aftermath, Kashmir collection, documenting the devastated towns and cities of the disputed Indian territory. For his latest book however, Ehrbahn has taken on a very different challenge: capturing the intensity of headbanging – a style of dancing associated with heavy metal music. Headbanging involves the violent shaking of the head in time with the down-beat of rock songs. Dancers thrust their heads back and forth, in circular motions, and side to side (the ‘Demon’s Whip’), making their (usually, long) hair flow wildly and chaotically. Variations within the style are numerous. The ‘Hammer of Thor’ technique involves the bashing of one’s fist on the knee in time with the cranial thrust itself, whilst the ‘Whiplash’ – one of the most hazardous moves – dispenses with musical timing, favouring a frenetic, fit-like shudder. The ‘Arschloch’ headbang, which involves the regular full-body bang …

2015-09-23T15:53:47+00:00

VIDEO: We Want More, Image Making and Music in the 21st Century

What is music photography? It’s a simple question but one that gets more slippery the more you look at it. With holograms of dead stars such as Michael Jackson and Tupac now ‘performing’ live, and Kurt Cobain a playable character on Guitar Hero, it’s clear depictions of our pop icons have opened up – and meanwhile more open-minded attitudes towards pop culture have allowed fine artists to incorporate popular music, vinyl records, cassette tapes and even rock groups into their work. Grappling with these issues after The Photographers’ Gallery asked me to curate a show on the subject, I decided to set some parameters. First, I restricted myself to full-time, working photographers – not programmers, not producers, not the many amateurs who share images online, not the stars who post images of themselves on portals like Instagram, Vine or YouTube, and not the webcams behind the Boiler Room. I find this work interesting from a sociological and anthropological point of view but maybe not so much from a photographic point of view, so I was …

2015-07-24T13:25:40+00:00

BJP #7838: Sound & Vision

The latest issue of the oldest photography magazine in the world, available to buy now, has been put together to coincide with the opening of the contemporary music photography show We Want More at The Photographer’s Gallery, curated by BJP Deputy Editor Diane Smyth, from the 17 July to 20 September 2015. It includes features on Sven Marquardt, a long-term bouncer from underground Berlin, capturing decades of nefarious activity in a global capital of live music. We speak to Sanna Charles about her book God Listens to Slayer, the culmination of ten years spent photographing the metal band’s most dedicated cult fans. And we feature Michele Sibiloni, who realises a new vision of Ugandan society by embedding himself in the vibrant cultural nightlife of Kampala, the nation’s capital. Here, Diane Smyth, editor of this month’s BJP, introduces the issue: “Photography, like literature, has many genres. And as with literature, some of those genres have more stature than others. Where literary fiction has more cachet than detective novels, documentary has higher status than music photography – which is all too often …

2015-08-07T14:13:59+00:00

BJP Staff