All posts tagged: music

Emily Stein shoots musical youth for Stella McCartney’s new kids’ range

“Music is a language for all humans; it gets under your skin and brings out and expresses strong emotions,” says Emily Stein, whose latest commission took her to a primary school in North London, where she photographed young children for Stella McCartney’s Kid’s fashion range

2017-09-12T12:14:17+00:00

50 years on, Sgt Pepper reverberates with Dean Chalkley

“The Beatles were inspired by different things on that album: it was created out of everyday things and everyday notions, even though people view it as a psychedelic masterpiece,” says Dean Chalkley ahead of a new exhibition launching in Shoreditch this week. His collection, Reverberation, takes its inspiration from Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, 50 years on from its release. Just like the original album, Reverberation is set to take people on a treasure hunt to find hidden meanings out of everyday realities.

2017-09-08T17:22:20+00:00

Lost in Music: the story of dance music in 500 images

This Friday, theprintspace are putting on a party. Lost in Music is a major exhibition of 500 photographs that document the history of dance music, from the early rumblings of DIY DJ nights to the behemoth that is modern club culture. In conjunction with PYMCA, the world’s largest youth culture picture agency, the Shoreditch photographic pro-lab hopes to create a visual story that includes the full breadth of the movement, including professional photographers as well as personal snapshots from club-goers and DJs. Photographers being exhibited include Normski, Dean Chalkley and Dougie Wallace. The exhibition will tour the UK starting from February, but on the 4th of December, theprintspace are hosting a club night at Village Underground – the venue will be plastered with paraphenalia from various eras, hundreds of clubgoers and of course, the photographs. Recruiting the likes of Dean Chalkley, Gavin Mills and the legendary Danny Rampling to man the decks, the aim is to present music photography in the most natural, inevitable setting: the club. I went down to theprintspace offices to find out …

2015-12-03T11:26:47+00:00

The morning after the night before: inside Germany’s techno clubs

Long-time fans of electronica, André Giesemann and Daniel Schulz decided to combine their love of the German techno scene and photography in a joint ongoing project. The pair began collaborating in 2009 on Vom Bleiben, which features ghostly images of the insides of clubs after the ravers have left. Their images, taken on a large format camera with a 75mm lens, seek to record the emptiness of these spaces just after the club nights have ended – “the moment when the traces of the event become visible”, says Hamburg-based Giesemann. “Most of these clubs we know, and have experienced. In a way, this series is like an archive of clubs for me and Daniel, who is based in Berlin, since some of the buildings aren’t around any more. Sometimes they only exist for a while as temporary spaces.” In these images, the harsh light, made even more intense by the long exposures used by the pair (sometimes of several minutes), reveals the debris from the activities of the night before. Used beer bottles overflow on bar tops; discarded cigarette packets lie strewn …

2015-10-28T16:36:50+00:00

Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band, forty years ago, on the tour that made them

Forty years ago, in the months leading up to the release of Bruce Springsteen’s seminal Born to Run, photojournalist Barbara Pyle documented a band of young men on tour across America, unaware they were about to be catapulted from left-field obscurity to the forefront of American rock music. Pyle photographed Springsteen and The E Street Band in their native New Jersey habitat of Asbury Park to the Cajun splendour of New Orleans – where the band were touring the new material. She photographed them in her own family home in rural Oklahoma, and gives a broad mix of studio portraits, performance shots and travelogue images. “I first saw Bruce and the E Street Band by accident,” Pyle says. “I was blown away by their music. For the next year, I drove to as many of their gigs as I could reach. They jokingly started calling me their ‘official unofficial photographer’. I was just expected to be there, and I almost always was – on my self-imposed mission to document this little known New Jersey band. “I had the remarkable good fortune to spend most of …

2015-10-20T17:18:46+00:00

Boys in the corner: Simon Wheatley’s images of Britain’s most exciting music subculture

It’s 2012 and in East London, the long-awaited Olympic Games are underway. Stratford, home to the new £537 million Olympic stadium and Westfield shopping centre, is heaving. Tourist money pours in. London, the UK and the world beyond, gets into the spirit of celebration. Simon Wheatley is in a living room in Maryland, a poor residential area less than a mile away from the Olympic Village. He’s recording this historic moment in time through the eyes of Chronik, a veteran grime MC. Through a haze of smoke, Chronik talks about the challenges of raising his family: “Now you want to make it a nice, white area, but what happened to the last ten years?” While he talks, he taps a Playstation controller, firing gunshots at clay targets on an Olympics video game. “That’s exactly it.” Wheatley says, pointing at the crisp symbolism playing out on his iPad screen three years on. “He was so near. Yet the only way he could gain access to the Olympics was in a video game – in virtual reality.” The …

2015-10-15T10:47:03+00:00

Sanibal Island. 1976. An outtake from the session for the record Black and Blue. Photo by Hiro. ©The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones – 53 years in photography

At over 500 pages and weighing 10 pounds, Taschen’s new photographic survey of The Rolling Stones reflects the magnitude of the band’s 53-year-long career. Philip Townsend’s photograph of the band wearing checked suits and slightly awkward smiles on the eve of their first British tour is among the images to document the band’s bright-eyed and blues-obsessed beginnings. Shots from the height of fame follow, such as Michael Cooper’s saturated colour photographs, which capture the band draped in all the trappings of 60s psychedelia. The journey draws to a close with Anton Corbijn’s striking black and white shots of The Stones in 2005, visibly aged but lacking none of the spark of youth. For a publication that boasts the work of several prominent photographers – Cecil Beaton, David Bailey, Ethan Russell and Annie Leibovitz to name but a few – choosing a cover must have been difficult. A photograph taken by British photographer Gered Mankowitz is given the pride of place. Shot during the same session which produced the cover of the band’s 1967 album Between …

2015-04-21T18:41:43+00:00

BJP Staff