All posts tagged: National Media Museum

John Davies’ The British Landscape on show in New York

“The British Landscape…is a long-term ongoing project about the enormous changes that have taken place in the UK – the world’s first industrial society and the first to de-industrialise,” says John Davies. “Much of Britain’s infrastructure and the rapid expansion of industrial cities were created through the unprecedented growth of the Industrial Revolution. By the early 1980s, when I started this project, many of these large-scale industries and industrial communities were in terminal decline.”

2017-12-12T16:49:43+00:00

The V&A announces a new Photography Centre in London

Designed by David Kohn Architects, the new centre will open in Autumn 2018 and more than double the V&A’s current photography exhibition space. The opening will be accompanied by a museum-wide photography festival, a new digital resource, and a new history of photography course run with the Royal College of Art. The V&A plans to run events and activities in the new centre, and will continue to expand the facility. Phase Two will see the museum add more gallery space, and create a teaching and research facility, a browsing library, and a studio and darkroom which will enable photographers’ residencies. The new centre comes as the V&A transfers the Royal Photographic Society’s collection from the Science Museum Group, which was formerly held in the National Media Museum in Bradford. The transfer adds over 270,000 photographs, 26,000 publications, and 6000 pieces of equipment to the V&A’s holdings – which was already one of the largest and most important in the world, including around 500,000 works collected since the foundation of the museum in 1852. The RPS collection includes …

2017-06-13T15:17:45+00:00

From the archive… the long-simmering feud over housing Britain’s photography

News that the National Media Museum is losing the world-class RPS Collection to the Victoria and Albert Museum had us delving into our archives for some background. There is history between these two, as our 4 March 1982 edition attests, reporting open warfare between the museums long ahead of the Bradford opening. In our leader, ‘Whither Bradford’, published more than a year ahead of the National Museum of Photography, Film and Television’s opening, the unnamed writer (most likely then-editor, Geoffrey Crawley) charts a public spat that contrasts sharply with the cloak-and-dagger spin employed today. “Since the formal announcement of the go-ahead of the Bradford Museum was given last year, the Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, Sir Roy Strong, has been sounding off in the public prints with objections based on the belief that the new museum would be overlapping unnecessarily with the V&A photographic collection. His criticisms were particularised to the point of maintaining that the V&A was deliberately kept out of the picture until after the press conference 130 Archive at which …

2016-05-19T15:38:26+00:00

The history behind Bradford’s loss of the Royal Photography Society archive to London’s V&A

The news that the Royal Photographic Society Collection is being transferred from the National Media Museum in Bradford to the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London can easily fit into the narrative of unequal distribution of arts funding outside of London. The reasons for this are structural and historical. And this is the reason why photography has never had a secure place in our museums. It was in the late 19th century that some of our major museums where founded on the fault line defined by either the applied arts or the scientific. It was from The South Kensington Museum founded in 1857 – six years after the Great Exhibition – that the present Science Museum and the V&A would emerge, one taking the scientific and technology route and the other developing into an applied art museum. This is the fault line that still has to be negotiated today. You can see the new Media Space at the Science Museum as one way of dealing with this split with their mix of exhibitions displaying art and …

2016-03-11T15:12:30+00:00

400,000 photographs to be moved from Bradford to London to create world’s largest imagery collection

More than 400,000 photographs and related paraphernalia held at Bradford’s National Media Museum will be transferred to the V&A, making the London-based museum the single largest collection of photography in the world  – a move that will see, “in the short term”, the permanent gallery space dedicated to photographs at the V&A doubling in size. The collection being transferred encompasses vintage prints, the world’s first negative, unique daguerreotypes and early colour photographs, as well as important albums, books, cameras and the archives of major photographers. The collection – which includes frontier photographers like William Henry Fox Talbot, Hill & Adamson, Roger Fenton and Julia Margaret Cameron, holdings by classic artists like Alfred Stieglitz, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Gertrude Käsebier, Paul Strand and Ansel Adams, and contemporary photographers like Martin Parr, Sarah Jones, Susan Derges and Simon Roberts – will be made available to the public in a collection titled The International Photography Resource Centre. Rarities in the collection Oscar Rejlander’s 1857  composite The Two Ways of Life, Mervyn O’Gorman’s 1913 autochrome Christina, Yusuf Karsh’s iconic Winston Churchill portrait and Angus McBean’s surreal study of …

2016-02-02T13:10:54+00:00

BJP Staff