All posts tagged: New York

London’s Hayward Gallery reopens in January with a huge Gursky retrospective

London’s Hayward Gallery is reopening with a huge Andreas Gursky retrospective on 25 January, celebrating its 50th anniversary and its return after a comprehensive two-year refurbishment. The first major retrospective of the acclaimed German photographer in the UK, Andreas Gursky will include around 60 of images from the 1980s to the present day. Focusing on man-made structures and large gatherings of people. Gursky’s images draw attention to our changing relationship with the natural world, and chronicle the effects of globalisation on daily life; his subjects range from a crowded techno music festival in Germany (May Day IV, 2000/2014), to an underground water tank in the Kamioka Nucleon Decay Experiment in Japan (Kamiokande, 2007), in which a boat glides amid a gold-studded interior. “I only pursue one goal,” he has said, “the encyclopedia of life”.

2017-12-07T12:51:28+00:00

A different take on the city in Susannah Ray’s New York Waterways

For Susannah Ray to get into the centre of New York city, she must first travel over a series of bridges and waterways. Whether driving across Jamaica Bay or taking the subway from her home in Rockaway Beach, Queens to Brooklyn or Manhattan, she repeatedly finds herself captivated by the sights she encounters – the sky changing colour above the water; the birdwatchers on the shores; men fishing near a scrap metal yard, up to their waists in waders. She sees groups of people performing religious rituals, gatherings and prayers on the banks of the river. She sees more simply being. Ray’s image of New York is utterly coloured by its relationship with the water. So when she decided to create a portrait on the city, she decided to use those urban waterways to weave it all together. “The water serves so many different purposes for so many different people,” she says. “It acted as a focal point. The communal draw symbolises that idea of coexistence.”

2017-11-28T13:01:59+00:00

David Brandon Geeting aims to confuse with his new book, Amusement Park

There is something frantic about David Brandon Geeting’s photography. In his latest collection, Amusement Park, the Greenpoint, Brooklyn-based artist creates a mood that is exhilarating and vibrant, but also verging on collapse, as though its tether could snap at any moment. Where his 2015 book, Infinite Power, was energetic and kinetic, with Amusement Park he’s aiming for “information overload”. “I’m not afraid of making people confused or dizzy,” he says. “I wanted it to be an onslaught of colours and forms and things that don’t make sense.”

2017-10-09T10:55:29+00:00

Any Answers: Joel Meyerowitz

The camera is like a divining rod and I have lived my life letting instinct show me what I am interested in, says Joel Meyerowitz, who quit his job in advertising in 1962, after seeing Robert Frank at work. A native New Yorker, he became known for his early colour work on the city streets

2017-11-06T15:18:05+00:00

Obituary – Arlene Gottfried, celebrated chronicler of NYC

“Arlene had a unique vision of the world around her,” says gallerist Daniel Cooney. “She was kind and compassionate and she had a wonderful sense of humour, and all of it came through in her work. That’s what made her images so beautiful and unique.” Born in the Coney Island district of New York and growing up in the Crown Heights district of Brooklyn, Arlene Gottfried studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York and initially found work with an advertising agency before going freelance for publications such as The New York Times Magazine, Life, and Newsweek. But her true passion was for portraits shot on the fly, and often on the street, and it was for this work that she became celebrated.

2017-08-14T11:45:48+00:00

Englishman in New York: A young photographer blends old and new techniques

When Owen Harvey arrived in New York last August, armed with his Bronica SQ-A, he wasn’t sure what to expect. Having just left a job to focus full-time on his own photography, he’d set off for America with a not-entirely-concrete plan to shoot a project on a low riders group he’d been in touch with over email. “All they said was, ‘Yeah no worries, give us a call when you’re here’,” he remembers. “I didn’t really know if it was going ahead or not but I thought the worse thing that happens is I make some connections in New York and fly back a few weeks later.” Luckily for him, they stuck to their word. The next three months saw Harvey fully immersed in the world of the Lunatics Lowrider Club: days spent meeting up with them individually to shoot portraits, nights spent cruising around the city in convoys of ten vehicles. Harvey’s recent clients include Time, GQ and the BBC but it’s his personal series on British youth subcultures, Mod UK and Skins and …

2017-05-05T10:50:16+00:00

Photobook: City of Lights – The Undiscovered New York Photographer Marvin E Newman

He’s 89 but he’s just got his first monograph – Marvin E Newman, a native New Yorker who’s been taking photographs since the 1940s. Born in 1927 in New York, Newman was one of the first people to graduate with a degree in photography from the Chicago’s Institute of Art and Design; heading back to NYC in 1952 he then became one of the first to shoot the city in colour. Building up a remarkable body of work there and beyond, he also shot sports photography commissions for magazines such as Life, Look and Sports Illustrated. Represented by the Howard Greenberg Gallery and lauded by Eastman House, MoMA, and the International Center of Photography, Newman’s work has been known to collectors for years, but first came to wider attention through the book New York: Portrait of a City, edited by former BJP editor Reuel Golden. The new monograph, which includes some 170 images from the 1940s-80s, is also edited by Golden, and includes an essay by New York-based writer, curator and critic Lyle Rexer. City of Lights: The Undiscovered New …

2017-04-27T16:22:41+00:00

A Matter of Memory: Photography as Object in the Digital Age

Do you remember the last time you went out and printed a snapshot? Or filled up a chunky, leather-bound photo album with a set of family portraits? If you’re under 30, the answer could well be never. With the immediacy of digital recording and the convenience of smartphones for organising and sharing images, the act of printing physical pictures has become something of an anachronism for anyone but hipsters and art photographers. A new exhibition at the George Eastman Museum in Rochester, New York, seeks to address how the gradual decline of the photographic object is affecting our relationship to memory, and what happens when our century-old physical tie to the photograph is broken. “What has changed is the tactility of the photograph,” says exhibition curator Lisa Hostetler. “Now that images are on a screen, they’re sort of ‘forever young’, and it becomes difficult to realise that there are many things that connect us to the past in terms of basic human emotions. These become more difficult to tease out when everything looks contemporary.” A Matter of …

2016-11-09T15:54:51+00:00

Ordinary Beauty: Revisiting Saul Leiter’s pioneering images

During his lifetime, Saul Leiter (1923–2013) was something of the ignored artist of American photographic history. While his career spanned a time when quintessential New York street photography was defined as swift, sharp and precise, Leiter’s leisured, impressionist style went against the grain. Leiter was a pioneer of colour photography, adventurously using Kodachrome colour slide film well before the likes of William Eggleston and Joel Meyerowitz. As the Guardian’s Sean O’Hagan wrote in Leiter’s obituary, “[his photographs] are as much about evoking an atmosphere as nailing the decisive moment.” A retrospective of the late photographer’s work has just began at The Photographers’ Gallery; the first major public show of his work in the UK features more than 100 works, including early black-and-white and colour photographs, sketchbooks and related materials.     While Leiter’s early black-and-white images were published in LIFE magazine and exhibited in New York and Tokyo, he quickly moved into fashion photography, shooting for Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, British Vogue, Esquire and more. When I speak to Brett Rogers, director of the Soho gallery …

2016-02-26T16:00:03+00:00

Rebirth of the Cool: discovering the art of Robert James Campbell

The story of Robert James Campbell is a complex one. Born to a prestigious New England family (his grandfather was the inventor John Jay Nash) he moved to New York City and set about photographing jazz virtuosos such as John Coltrane, The Modern Jazz Quartet, Philly Joe Jones and Wayne Shorter – alongside musical legends like Chuck Berry, Richie Havens & Miriam Makeba. Jessica Ferber’s collection covers some of Campbell’s work, shot at legendary clubs like Birdland, The Village Vanguard, and The Gaslight Café. The book also covers Campbell’s street photography, international work from his time spent in Germany, and tour imagery. It documents the short career of a photographer who “died alone and penniless” in Burlington, Vermont in 2002. In was in Burlington that Ferber first discovered Campbell. After graduating from The University of Vermont, she volunteered to survey some boxes that were left behind by Campbell “after he passed away at a local homeless shelter”.  Says Ferber: “At the time, I didn’t know who Campbell was, and I understood that little was known about the …

2016-01-04T18:18:47+00:00

BJP Staff