All posts tagged: Photobooks

Bob Books Photobook Award: Winner Announced!

We are excited to announce the winner and runners up to the first ever Bob Books Photobook Award.

Through the passion reflected in the quality of work submitted, the competition has undoubtedly proven that the interest for photobooks is very much alive and flourishing within the photographic community.

Below is this year’s winner and runners up.

2017-07-27T10:33:48+00:00

How to create a ground-breaking photobook

So you’ve thought long and hard about whether the time is right to make a photobook, and you’re sure there is an audience for your project; what’s next? If you want to make a book then you have to start physically making it, says Dewi Lewis, whose experience in publishing stretches over more than 30 years. “If someone is working on a project they are convinced is a book, my view is they should be continually putting together a dummy in its loosest sense – something where the work is sequenced,” says Lewis. “You need to see as you go where the gaps and strengths are. So it’s a case of continually printing out the images, putting them in a sequence, and living with it.” There is a lot to think about when deciding the look of your book, such as choosing which images to show, finding an effective way to translate those images to page, and refining the edit. Photographers should have their final selection of images ready and organised well in advance, advises …

2017-06-26T11:55:49+00:00

The first step to making a successful photobook isn’t what you think it is

To mark the launch of the Bob Books Photobook Award, a new competition from Bob Books, the UK based on-demand photobook printer, BJP is publishing a three-part series featuring advice on how to make and promote a photobook. In part one, publishing experts and photographers who’ve successfully made the journey share invaluable advice on what to think about before diving in. Producing a photobook is an important milestone in any photographer’s career, demanding a huge investment of time, energy, and resources. With so many photobooks being published every day and the bar to entry lower than it has ever been, how do you make a book that does your project justice, stands out from the rest, and most importantly sells? Publisher Dewi Lewis, who has been in the industry for more than 30 years and has worked on books with photographers including Martin Parr, Edmund Clark, and Stuart Freedman, says the starting point has to be for every photographer to ask why he or she wants to make a book. “Not enough photographers ask themselves …

2017-06-26T11:59:00+00:00

Foreigner: Migration into Europe 2015-2016

On 13 and 19 April last year, two migrant boats capsized off the coast of Libya, with the loss of more than a thousand lives. Many of those who drowned were refugees, fleeing civil war, and therefore protected under the 1951 Refugee Convention, but their deaths won little sympathy on the pages of some of the UK’s biggest newspapers. On 17 April, The Sun columnist Katie Hopkins wrote an article comparing migrants to cockroaches or the norovirus, adding that Britain needed gunships, not rescue boats, to send them back. “No, I don’t care,” she wrote. “Show me pictures of coffins, show me bodies floating in water, play violins and show me skinny people looking sad. I still don’t care.” As the so-called migrant crisis continued unabated, so too did the negative press. By July, the Daily Mail, Britain’s most-read newspaper brand and Hopkins’ new employer, was running headlines like “The ‘swarm’ on our streets”, calling for the army to go to the Jungle refugee camp in Calais. A year later, the Daily Express warned of …

2016-10-20T12:14:51+00:00

The last gasps of Norwegian rural life

At first glance the Bjelland siblings, Edvard and Bergit, are unremarkable. They grew up along four other siblings in Brusand, Jæren – a remote village on the south-west Norwegian coast, on a farm which dates back to the 1800s and has passed through their family for four generations. On the farm, horses, cows, pigs, hens and over one hundred sheep were kept. But for Norwegian photographer Elin Høyland, the Bjellands represent something of significance, and worth preserving. When Høyland first met Edvard, Bergit has recently died, the livestock had been sold off and the land was now rented out. He was now alone, save a handful of sheep he continued to look after. The rural existence that defined the land for centuries was now slowly vanishing from sight. This view was shared by Norwegian regional arts institute Hå Gamle Prestegård. They commissioned Høyland, who was shortlisted for the Photo Folio Review Award at this year’s Les Rencontres d’Arles, to visit the Bjelland homestead and create a record of the 200 year old farmhouse (a listed building) and this lifestyle …

2016-01-13T14:32:24+00:00

Jack Latham wins the second edition of the Bar-Tur Photobook Award

Welsh photographer Jack Latham has won the Bar-Tur Photobook Award, for his project Sugar Paper Theories. Latham will work with The Photographers’ Gallery and Here Press to produce his first photobook, a prize worth £20,000.   The winning project traces an infamous true crime case in Iceland. Known as the Reykjavik Confessions, it involved the testimonies of six people, who confessed to two murders they had no apparent memory of. Latham employed a mix of archival images, ephemera and his own photographs to convey the sinister ambience of a horrific, yet hazy collective memory. Latham tells BJP, “the Bar-Tur Award will really enable us to be as ambitious with the project as possible. The case itself is so complicated and trying to retell it through photographs alone wouldn’t be enough. I’m working with writer Sofia Kathryn Smith and now, continuing the project with a book in mind means we’re able to collaborate fully in a symbiotic way. Working with an exciting publisher like Here Press goes hand and hand with the work, it’s different and hopefully the book will reflect …

2015-12-02T15:19:39+00:00

Self Publish, Be Happy takes over The Photographers’ Gallery

Things are going to look very different at The Photographers’ Gallery this week. In the first of a new series of experimental publisher residencies, they’ve invited Self Publish, Be Happy to take over their studio floor and use the space as they wish. Coinciding with the launch of SPBH founder Bruno Ceschel’s new book Self Publish, Be Happy: A DIY Photobook Manual and Manifesto (Aperture/SPBH Editions 2015), there will be a series of talks and workshops around the world of self-publishing. Ceschel was in the midst of moving his Dalston studio into The Photographers’ Gallery, but found time earlier this week to talk to us about the interesting ways he’ll be using the space. “We’re taking over a whole floor, yesterday we loaded a van with literally most of our studio – so a thousand self-published books from our collection that the public will have access to, even our tables and chairs – and we’re going to be running our whole office from The Photographer’s Gallery. “It’s a chance for the audience to see what …

2015-11-20T15:13:34+00:00

Examining the 1% through the lens

With defiantly left-wing political candidates all over the globe sweeping to prominence on agendas condemning inequality, issues such as gentrification, wage disparity and the allocation of resources have moved from the academic lecture halls to the streets and living rooms. With the public discourse beginning to reach fever pitch, Time associate photo editor Myles Little’s ambitiously international group exhibition One Percent: Privilege in a Time of Inequality grapples with this era-defining issue by depicting those at the top of the pyramid. The group exhibition will be touring all continents, taking in Pingyao, Dubai, Berlin, Lagos, Lishui, Guatemala City, Sarajevo, Sydney, Chicago, Aberystwyth and Addis Ababa. Photographers exhibited include Zed Nelson, Christopher Anderson and Juliana Sohn. “It’s a topic that’s hard to avoid these days, whether you’re interested in photography, or politics, or economics. The Pope has spoken very eloquently about it, even billionaires have spoken out against it,” Little says. “Living in New York City, it’s in your face everyday. It’s Dickensian here, you see the best and the worst of everything very close together, …

2015-09-10T17:45:56+00:00

BJP Staff