All posts tagged: Photobooks

Self Publish, Be Happy takes over The Photographers’ Gallery

Things are going to look very different at The Photographers’ Gallery this week. In the first of a new series of experimental publisher residencies, they’ve invited Self Publish, Be Happy to take over their studio floor and use the space as they wish. Coinciding with the launch of SPBH founder Bruno Ceschel’s new book Self Publish, Be Happy: A DIY Photobook Manual and Manifesto (Aperture/SPBH Editions 2015), there will be a series of talks and workshops around the world of self-publishing. Ceschel was in the midst of moving his Dalston studio into The Photographers’ Gallery, but found time earlier this week to talk to us about the interesting ways he’ll be using the space. “We’re taking over a whole floor, yesterday we loaded a van with literally most of our studio – so a thousand self-published books from our collection that the public will have access to, even our tables and chairs – and we’re going to be running our whole office from The Photographer’s Gallery. “It’s a chance for the audience to see what …

2015-11-20T15:13:34+00:00

Examining the 1% through the lens

With defiantly left-wing political candidates all over the globe sweeping to prominence on agendas condemning inequality, issues such as gentrification, wage disparity and the allocation of resources have moved from the academic lecture halls to the streets and living rooms. With the public discourse beginning to reach fever pitch, Time associate photo editor Myles Little’s ambitiously international group exhibition One Percent: Privilege in a Time of Inequality grapples with this era-defining issue by depicting those at the top of the pyramid. The group exhibition will be touring all continents, taking in Pingyao, Dubai, Berlin, Lagos, Lishui, Guatemala City, Sarajevo, Sydney, Chicago, Aberystwyth and Addis Ababa. Photographers exhibited include Zed Nelson, Christopher Anderson and Juliana Sohn. “It’s a topic that’s hard to avoid these days, whether you’re interested in photography, or politics, or economics. The Pope has spoken very eloquently about it, even billionaires have spoken out against it,” Little says. “Living in New York City, it’s in your face everyday. It’s Dickensian here, you see the best and the worst of everything very close together, …

2015-09-10T17:45:56+00:00

Finding photography in a book market in an old Peckham car park

“I think we’re probably the most unambitious book market there is, ” says Lewis Chaplin, founder and one of the organisers of Peckham’s very own photofair Copeland Book Market. Chaplin is hardly one for bluster, but perhaps he should be. The annual south London art book market has become a hotbed of the best emerging photography in the UK. Running from the 31st of July to the 2nd of August, Copeland showcases thoughtfully crafted work from independent publishers such as Dobedo, Arcadia Missa and Jane & Jeremy. Chaplin and the team appreciates publishers for whom: “You can just tell that the motivation for making [books] is out of pure enjoyment, rather than to expand their business empire, turn a profit or make the right connections.” Now in its fourth year, this time Copeland are partnering with The White Review, a quarterly arts and literature journal who will be bringing together a curated series of events and publishers. It also represents a broadening of sorts, Chaplin says: “This year we’re really excited about having more literary publishers participating …

2015-08-11T14:30:09+00:00

Emi Anrakuji – ‘1800 millimetres. It’s the size of my bed’

The elusive Emi Anrakuji. Her work seems to have exploded onto the photography scene in early 2000, attracting the attention of Daido Moriyama in 2004. “He was very much impressed,” says Emi, whose body of work is a series of self-portraits in which she often focuses on the most intimate details of her anatomy while simultaneously concealing her identity. It’s this contradiction that obfuscates the viewer. Legs splayed, crouched on a bed on all fours, a finger inserted into her vagina – the self-portraits in 1800 Millimètre, Emi’s latest body of work, “are not erotic at all,” she says. “1800 millimetres is just the size of my bed.” A bed to which she was confined, which came to represent her world – the very world from where her work originated. “It’s work that came out of my sickbed.” In 1800 Millimètre, Anrakuji poses nude, in solitude, in close shadowy settings – the confines of her bedroom staged for the gaze of a lens. She describes herself as “an alchemist of images”, blurring the contrived and the authentic …

2015-07-17T12:48:37+00:00

VIDEO: What did Offprint London at the Tate Modern mean for independent publishing?

Last week, Offprint London, an art publishing fair with a focus on photobooks, took over the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall. We spoke to Yannick Bouillis and Bruno Ceschel, founders of what was at the time the biggest photobook fair in Europe, about the current state of independent publishing in London, and what it means for Britain’s photography culture. Coinciding with Photo London, the fair attracted more than 150 artists, independent and self-publishers, selling photography books, zines, posters, prints and magazines. In collaboration with Tate Modern and curator Simon Baker, Offprint London dedicates a special space for photobooks, inviting independent photobook publishers from all over the world. Along with photography, books on contemporary art, graphic design, literature, poetry, philosophy, and experimental music were on sale. Across the weekend,  a series of workshops and performances were organised by Bruno Ceschel, founder of Self Publish, Be Happy. The fair was designed to “showcase an alliance between printed strategies and digital cultures within the art world, presenting concrete examples of the contemporary dissemination of artistic practices.” Stay up to date with stories such as this, delivered to your …

2015-06-25T16:28:26+00:00

New Japanese Photography at the Doomed Gallery this weekend

What do Daisuke Yokota, Go Itami and Kenji Hirasawa have in common? They’re all showing work at an exciting but fleeting exhibition of emerging Japanese photographers at Doomed Gallery this week. Featuring a photobook showcase, a projection of images by nearly 100 photographers, and installations by Itami and Hirasawa plus Daisuke Nakashima, Hiroshi Takizawa, Mai Narita, Naohiro Utagawa and Yukihito Kono, New Japanese Photography opens with a private view and party from 6pm on 22 January, and closes on 25 January. The gallery is open from 4pm-8pm on Friday and from 12pm-8pm on Saturday and Sunday; Naohiro Utagawa and Yukihito Kono will be at the gallery on the opening night for a book signing. [bjp_ad_slot] The exhibition is curated by Space Cadet, an online gallery launched by Masayoshi Suzuki in 2011, and Stay Alone, a platform and publishing house for artists launched by photographers Suguru Ryuzaki and Yukihito Kono in 2013. The curators hope to show the vibrancy of the contemporary Japanese photography scene, they say, moving it out of the long shadow cast by the 1960s Provoke movement. Doomed Gallery is based at 65-67 Ridley …

2015-04-17T14:15:43+00:00

“God’s flock”

You may remember the image: a girl looks apprehensively at the camera, her fingers covering her mouth as stray strands of hair fall across her face. She is dressed simply – in a patterned dress – and sits in sparse surroundings. This portrait of a young Mennonite woman – Margarita Teichroeb – won the 2012 Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize (and made the cover of BJP). The judges praised the use of muted colours, the image’s “otherworldly feel”, and its timeless quality. Indeed, it is an image that could have been taken many decades ago; there is little to suggest this is a contemporary portrait. Its creator is Spanish photographer Jordi Ruiz Cirera, who between 2010 and 2011 spent time in Santa Cruz in Eastern Bolivia, photographing the Mennonite communities that live and work there. These are notoriously tight-knit communities, isolated colonies that are “remote and difficult to access” as Ruiz Cirera writes in the text for his new book, Los Menonos. They are people, he tells us, who view themselves as “God’s flock”, and …

2015-02-11T18:17:13+00:00

Davide Monteleone’s Spasibo

“Whenever you take a picture, of course you get involved,” Davide Monteleone tells an expectant audience during a tour of his new exhibition, Spasibo, at London’s Saatchi Gallery. “I always joke that I spend more time drinking tea and talking with people than taking pictures, but then all of this [talking and building relationships] will come out at one point or other in a picture.” The Italian photographer, and member of VII photography agency, is in London for the opening weekend of his Carmignac-winning exhibition. Monteleone won the fourth Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award for his work in Chechnya, and spent four months, based in Grozny, producing work off the back of his winning proposal. More than thirty of his images are on show at the London gallery until 03 November. [bjp_ad_slot] The Award, now in its fifth year, is the brainchild of Edouard Carmignac – director of the French foundation of the same name. The Award’s aim is to provide one photojournalist each year with the financial means (€50,000), and support to produce an in-depth photographic report. Carmignac sets the theme …

2014-10-15T22:23:38+00:00

A view on Chechnya

“Some deaths we know. Others we forget”, writes Edouard Carmignac in the prologue to Davide Monteleone’s photobook, Spasibo. Carmignac alludes to the code of silence that ravages the Russian region of Chechnya, a former enclave of brutal oppression, violent conflict and rampant corruption, and the subject of documentary photographer and 4th winner of the Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award Davide Monteleone’s series, Spasibo. Loosely translated as ‘thank you’, the photographer uses the word ironically for his poignant study of Chechan life under the tyrannical rule of Kremlin-backed leader Ramzan Kadyrov. [bjp_ad_slot] Published by Kehrer and priced at £40, the book contains striking black and white images that convey not the war-torn, blood-stained visions of the Republic’s past, but of a modern Chechnya. Monteleone takes the reader on an incisive journey through Chechnya’s myriad landscape, traversing snow-scattered mountains, neo-classical Stalinist constructions, gilded mosques, and run-down towns, to explore the complex identities and cultures of those who call the region home. Monteleone’s monograph possesses a sensitivity that captures the beautiful banality of his subjects. As Spasibo’s narrative gradually unfolds, an apparent undercurrent of ambiguity and emotion is …

2014-10-14T09:45:06+00:00

Photobook Awards

Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation has unveiled the shortlist for its fourth photobook awards. The prize celebrates the best photobooks published in the past year. This year’s edition is divided into three categories, including the inaugural Photography Catalogue of the Year category which, according to the organisers in a press statement, will be awarded to “the publication, publisher, or institution responsible for the exhibition catalogue or museum publication judged to be the best of 2014.” There are five nominations in this category, including Mark Cohen’s Dark Knees, the catalogue accompanying the exhibition Photobooks: Spain 1905–1977, and The Catalogue Box, published by Verlag Kettler/The PhotoBook Museum. [bjp_ad_slot] There are 12 books nominated in the Photobook of the Year category. These include The Big Book by W. Eugene Smith, Jim Goldberg’s Rich and Poor, Ruth van Beek’s The Arrangement, and Peter van Agtmael’s Disco Night Sept. 11, previously featured on bjp-online. 2013 Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism winner Davide Monteleone is also nominated for his series Spasibo, which explores Chechnyan identity and the republic’s complex history. Spasibo – the exhibition – will be shown at the Saatchi Gallery in …

2014-10-01T19:24:37+00:00

BJP Staff