All posts tagged: photography

Untitled - from the series 'Senselessness' © Laura Thompson

From air freshener ape men to rubber gloved ghouls: A look into the D&AD 2016 Shortlisted project by Laura Thompson

BJP

Technology expands perception. Air travel turns a journey of thousands of miles into a matter of hours. Google Maps shows us the way through unfamiliar city streets. Over Skype we can see and hear our loved ones wherever we and they are. But our new abilities have come at a price. Our physical senses have deadened. Laura Thompson came across this conception in a study by Claude Levi Strauss, which described how members of a particular tribe could see Venus in daylight. The anthropologist noted that this was a skill that Western sailors had had in the past, but lost over time since they no longer used it to navigate. “I was surprised to learn that you aren’t born with an innate ability to sense things,” says Thompson, whose series Senseless was shortlisted for the 2016 D&AD Next Photographer Award in partnership with Getty Images. “It develops as you’re a child, your senses adapt to the specifics of your environment. Advances in technology bring passivity. Certain parts of our brains don’t develop because technology is …

2017-02-24T11:01:08+00:00

Untitled #174 © Simen Johan

On Post-Production: Delving into the practices of 3 critically-acclaimed photographers

On Post-Production, Part 1: Klaus Pichler on bringing together analogue and digital techniques The first in the series taking you behind the image. Photographer Klaus Pichler shares his secret recipe for post production and his creative know-how. Read Klaus’ feature here. On Post-Production, Part 2: An insight into photographer Dean Chalkley’s workflow In the second instalment of this series, Dean Chalkley talks authenticity, why having fun making pictures is important to him, and how post-processing is a means to an end. Read Dean’s feature here. On Post-Production, Part 3: Inside the fantastical world of photographer Simen Johan In the third instalment of this series which looks at post-processing in the photographer’s workflow, Simen Johan talks about how he creates his beguiling images and why digital capture and the best modern imaging software gives him the freedom he craves. Read Simen’s feature here. Sponsored by Adobe Make your best shots even better with Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photography plan. With all the photography essentials, such as Lightroom and Photoshop, you’ll have the world’s leading tools to help you craft …

2017-02-23T16:07:47+00:00

Daft Punk : ©Dean Chalkley / NME / Time Inc (UK)

On Post-Production, Pt. 2: An insight into photographer Dean Chalkley’s workflow

English photographer and filmmaker Dean Chalkley (represented by Lo And Behold) has a reputation for being one of the nicest guys in the industry, and when he answers the phone, within seconds his infectious energy and charisma pour out. He barely pauses for breath during our hour-long call and peppers the conversation with lively anecdotes and colourful analogies. Over the past twenty years, Chalkley has built a reputation as one of the finest and most respected photographers of music and culture. He has photographed everyone from Daft Punk to Simon Cowell, Scarlett Johansson, Oasis, Jarvis Cocker, and The Cure, and shot for brands including Levi’s, Ray-Ban, Sony Music, and Adidas. Just the other week he was photographing DJs for the BBC, he says, and recently he published a book of his work, One. Chalkley wanted to be a fashion designer, but studied photography at Blackpool and Fylde College before shooting for Dazed and Confused magazine in the 90s. He still regularly shoots editorial, most recently for ShortList, the Observer Magazine, and ES Magazine, and he waxes lyrical …

2017-01-18T11:23:26+00:00

Irene, Orpington, from the series Hen. All images © Bex Day

Bex Day photographs gender fluidity in the UK’s older trans community

‘Hen’ translates as a gender-neutral pronoun in Swedish, and is intended to move beyond the binary for those who identify neither as male or female. Hen is also the title of photographer Bex Day’s forthcoming project, which focuses on the older generation in the UK’s trans community. Featuring 50 subjects over the age of 40, Hen tells personal stories and investigates the common themes of loss and discovery that unite its subjects. A deliberately empowering study of individuals often placed at the fringes, it records both light-hearted and disquieting experiences they have had. “When I was younger everyone thought I was a boy and my brother was a girl,” says Day. “My parents never told me ‘You’re a girl so you should dress in pink’; I really wasn’t a stereotypical girl, I was quite boyish and as I got older I felt more and more displaced. “I think, particularly within the trans community, that feeling of displacement can be quite prevalent as well. There’s something about not fitting in, and not succumbing to stereotypes.” Day found potential participants for Hen through online forums, and formed close friendships …

2016-11-24T16:10:41+00:00

Portrait (c) Simon Menges.

Creative Brief: Carmen Brunner

Having assisted Wolfgang Tillmans for a year after studying photography at Kingston University, Carmen Brunner returned in 2008 to become his photo editor and publications manager. Last year she went out on her own as a Berlin-based visual consultant and freelance photo editor, working on a major redesign for Geo and continuing as director of photography on Dummy magazine, which she took on in 2011. A year later she took on the same role at Fluter, a magazine aimed at young people and distributed free, created for Germany’s Federal Agency for Civic Education to “open up complex topics to first-time voters by giving them high-quality journalism and different perspectives”. Recent themes have included migration and integration. How does working with an artist compare with photo-editing? Both revolve around complex content – understanding the artistic concept of a show or a book, or the mission statement of a magazine, and thinking within that logic while bringing my own ideas to the table. What did you learn from Tillmans? I really enjoy seeing the world through Wolfgang’s …

2016-10-21T15:44:54+00:00

From My Winter Holiday in Beijing © Cedric Van Turtlebloom

My Winter Holiday in Beijing

Cedric Van Turtlebloom’s contemporary documentary style centres around everyday life – but not as we know it. Currently editing his second photobook, in which he takes a quizzical look at China’s burgeoning middle class and its penchant for artificial ski slopes, his visual stories are anything but conventional.

2016-09-09T22:51:30+00:00

Every year workers in the largest public cemetery in Guatemala exhume the bodies of some 4,000 infants to deposit in a mass grave, which borders the main garbage dump in the capital city. Cemetery rules state that six years after a burial, relatives must pay 180 Quetzales, around US$24 dollars, to renew the burial plot for another four years. If there is no payment, cemetery workers exhume the bodies of the young children and put the skeleton in a mass grave. Almost none of the relatives pay the fees and over 4,000 bodies are exhumed annually.

The cemetery in Guatemala that exhumes babies’ graves

When a child dies, some parents quell their pain with the belief that their child is among the angels. Others find comfort in knowing their child is at rest. They know there is a place where, in moments of quiet despair, they can drop to their knees and grieve the absence of their little body to hold. So when photojournalist Saul Martinez learned that, in his home country of Guatemala, deceased children were being exhumed from their places of rest and being disposed of in a public burial pit, it struck him as inconceivable. “I set out to find this cemetery that I had heard about. It was somewhat difficult to get access to it; the workers didn’t really want to let me see much at first. “I was so shocked when I saw the remains of children being pulled out, not only because of the fact that babies were being exhumed but because a job like this actually exists.” And so began Forgotten Children, Guatemala City, a documentary short and series of images that …

2015-10-19T12:25:10+00:00

From 1800 Millimètre © Emi Anrakuji

Emi Anrakuji – ‘1800 millimetres. It’s the size of my bed’

The elusive Emi Anrakuji. Her work seems to have exploded onto the photography scene in early 2000, attracting the attention of Daido Moriyama in 2004. “He was very much impressed,” says Emi, whose body of work is a series of self-portraits in which she often focuses on the most intimate details of her anatomy while simultaneously concealing her identity. It’s this contradiction that obfuscates the viewer. Legs splayed, crouched on a bed on all fours, a finger inserted into her vagina – the self-portraits in 1800 Millimètre, Emi’s latest body of work, “are not erotic at all,” she says. “1800 millimetres is just the size of my bed.” A bed to which she was confined, which came to represent her world – the very world from where her work originated. “It’s work that came out of my sickbed.” In 1800 Millimètre, Anrakuji poses nude, in solitude, in close shadowy settings – the confines of her bedroom staged for the gaze of a lens. She describes herself as “an alchemist of images”, blurring the contrived and the authentic …

2015-07-17T12:48:37+00:00

Holding room. From Corrections, 2015 © Zora Murff

Kid criminals: tagged, tracked and cast off by society

“My dad left us when I was four or five, and I’ve been estranged from him ever since. Things were rough for my mum trying to raise two boys on her own,” says 28-year-old Zora Murff, whose series Corrections is informed in no small part by his experiences growing up disenfranchised, with a family diminished by low income, lack of opportunity and alcohol abuse. Born and raised in Des Moines, where one in three children live below the poverty line, Zora could easily have become a write-off. His mother was forced to take jobs out of town at weekends to provide for her two boys, often leaving them unsupervised for many hours. “My brother and I were very close when we were young, and I spent a lot of time following him around, until he got to the age where it wasn’t cool to have your little brother tagging along any more. When that happened, I had to learn to be alone – I started to read a lot and draw.” As Zora got older – with …

2015-07-06T15:26:20+00:00

BJP Staff