All posts tagged: photoshop

On Post-Production: Delving into the practices of 3 critically-acclaimed photographers

On Post-Production, Part 1: Klaus Pichler on bringing together analogue and digital techniques The first in the series taking you behind the image. Photographer Klaus Pichler shares his secret recipe for post production and his creative know-how. Read Klaus’ feature here. On Post-Production, Part 2: An insight into photographer Dean Chalkley’s workflow In the second instalment of this series, Dean Chalkley talks authenticity, why having fun making pictures is important to him, and how post-processing is a means to an end. Read Dean’s feature here. On Post-Production, Part 3: Inside the fantastical world of photographer Simen Johan In the third instalment of this series which looks at post-processing in the photographer’s workflow, Simen Johan talks about how he creates his beguiling images and why digital capture and the best modern imaging software gives him the freedom he craves. Read Simen’s feature here. Sponsored by Adobe Make your best shots even better with Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photography plan. With all the photography essentials, such as Lightroom and Photoshop, you’ll have the world’s leading tools to help you craft …

2018-02-15T11:09:15+00:00

On Post-Production, Pt. 3: Inside the fantastical world of photographer Simen Johan

Scandinavian photographer Simen Johan, known for his flawless digital composite images, has been likened to a film director in the past. So it is fitting that the artist, represented by Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, dreamt of making movies when he was growing up. Inspired and encouraged by his step-grandfather, the American movie producer and director Rod E. Geiger, Johan went to film school in Sweden before relocating to New York in 1992 to study film at the School of Visual Arts. He switched to photography during his time there, and although Johan has made his name as a fine art photographer, it is clear filmmaking still fascinates him. “I was attracted to filmmaking’s ability to create an immersive experience, through image, sound and motion,” says Johan. “Movies by directors such as Stanley Kubrick, David Lynch, and David Cronenberg transported me to suspenseful, strange and psychologically-charged places that didn’t merely entertain, but revealed complex truths about life, people and the world. “Photography to me was the next best thing to filmmaking,” he continues. “I had taken …

2018-02-15T11:09:33+00:00

On Post-Production, Pt. 1: Klaus Pichler on bringing together analogue and digital techniques

Austrian photographer Klaus Pichler is out climbing a volcano in Lanzarote the first time I try to get in touch. The next day he’s relaxing on the Spanish island’s sandy beaches, taking a well-deserved break after a busy 2016. In the past year, Pichler has won the first prize at Cortona on the Move for his project Golden Days Before They End, about Austria’s last remaining dive bars (featured in our November issue), and the Outstanding Artists Award from the Austrian Ministry of Culture. He has also been working on his latest personal project, This will change your life forever, an exploration of what he called the “swarm stupidity” of New Age esotericism. He’s also seen the publication of his two brand books for Schock, the German kitchen designer, both of which were designed to live up to the client’s name (and featured in BJP’s May issue). Featuring bold artificiality, wacky compositions and clashing colours, these books pair racoons with poodles, and turtles with flamingoes, and generally make the world of sinks look more exciting …

2018-02-15T11:09:54+00:00

Arrested Development in Thomas Mailaender’s Man Cave

Using his friends’ ribbing as a catalyst, the French multimedia artist’s exhibition at London’s Roman Road gallery, and contribution to a group show at The Tate Modern, sees him imagine a correspondence with his homebound, pregnant wife as he travels the world. Through a compilation of self-potraits and fictitious letters, Mailaender uses his trip – climbing mountains, deep-sea fishing, feedings animals – to meditate on his new responsibilities; fatherhood and family life, masculinity after boyhood. The work consists of a series of sham, photoshopped images of himself; a photomontage of holiday snaps collected from hours of trawling the internet. His face, superimposed onto gap year student mash-ups, are accompanied with formal letters to his wife back home. “My love, Another mountain-top on the counter!” he writes in one, alongside an image of him at the pinnacle of a snowy mountain. “You should have seen me lost in the clouds! What bliss! And feeling like the tallest man in the world! I love you both, Thomas”. Mailaender is usually absent from his iconoclastic projects, making Gone Fishing feel …

2016-04-12T10:36:05+00:00

The mature photography graduate inspired by Picasso and Hockney

Inspired by artists such as David Hockney, Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Robert Delaunay, Argentinian graduate Daniel M Cisilino fell in love with collage while studying at the National College of Art & Design (NCAD) in Dublin.     He describes the experience of learning about Hockney’s collages – or joiners as the Yorkshireman calls them – as akin to opening a Pandora’s Box. “I began to see photography in a completely different way. Hockney created photographic works by arranging multiple images in a similar way to a painter who uses brush strokes to create his work. They were not just photographs, they were more encompassing than that. This fascinated me, and I got hooked.”     Cisilino, who completed a certificate in photography and digital imaging at NCAD, set about photographing scenes close to home – his back garden, a bathroom, household paraphernalia – creating hundreds of images he could stitch together digitally. The idea, he explains, was to do away with a single viewpoint in favour of multiple perspectives. His method involved photographing each scene …

2016-01-13T14:33:44+00:00

Thomas Albdorf’s manufactures beauty and uncertainty by mixing the natural and the digital

Thomas Albdorf’s still lifes are never quite what they seem – the more you look, the more the perspectives, shapes and colours shift, reflecting the Austrian photographer’s interest in manufacturing beauty and uncertainty out of the seemingly mundane. “What fascinates me when I look at art created by other people is how they engage with simple objects within their immediate reach,” he says. “I feel drawn to people who manage to create something very beautiful and charming out of almost nothing.” Albdorf’s immediate surroundings are the outskirts of Vienna, an area he wandered in search of raw material for his Former Writer series. Seizing on wood, wire, tyres and fridges, he created a kind of ‘edgelands’ trash art, sometimes adding paint to enhance the sense of uncertainty. “I used to do graffiti writing but I stopped at an early age because it’s quite superficial,” he says. “But as I was wandering the peripheries of Vienna, I saw tags and I wanted to use a spray can again. “I like the idea because one of the easiest tools to use …

2015-09-14T12:31:20+00:00

On its 25th birthday, how did photoshop change photography?

Photoshop, which is celebrating its 25th birthday today, began because Thomas Knoll liked to procrastinate. In 1987, Knoll was working on a doctoral thesis in computer vision at the University of Michigan. He developed the early stages of the software almost by accident; pioneering a tool that democratised photography for a generation of people, while spawning a debate in photography, and particularly photojournalism, about the validity and authenticity of imagery that continues today. For now, in the age of Photoshop, any photograph can be manipulated by anyone. Knoll grew up using a darkroom in his parent’s basement, and was a keen amateur photographer. As a way of wasting time, he began creating a collection of image-processing utilities for his brother John, who worked as a digital-effects specialist. The program, which he called Display, was soon being used by many of John’s friends at his company, Industrial Light & Magic. It started to get passed around by word of mouth, and the Knoll brothers started to pitch the product. A number of companies thought about it, …

2015-04-17T14:08:01+00:00

BJP Staff