All posts tagged: portraiture

Chiwetel Ejiofor I, 2013 © Nadav Kander

How do you speak Nadav Kander? The man himself on mastering your creative language

British Journal of Photography caught up with Nadav Kander ahead of his appearance at The Photography Show 2017 in Birmingham. Conversation quickly turned to his recent much debated image of Donald Trump. Normally when Nadav Kander turns up to shoot a portrait, the only thing he’s thought through beforehand is the lighting. But Donald Trump was different. “I was really divided about how I should do it – how to do this TIME cover justice without putting my political views out there,” he says of his commission to photograph the US president for TIME’s 2016 Person of the Year cover. “If you photograph properly, you’re talking about a coming together of two histories. A person of 70, who’s had a life of 70 years, and a person of 54, who’s had a life of 54 years. As soon as politics comes in, you change things. It’s difficult to exclude that but you need to if you’re making a mature portrait that’s going to have any lasting effect.” What inspires him about photography has evolved with …

2017-03-10T12:21:39+00:00

Untitled #174 © Simen Johan

On Post-Production: Delving into the practices of 3 critically-acclaimed photographers

On Post-Production, Part 1: Klaus Pichler on bringing together analogue and digital techniques The first in the series taking you behind the image. Photographer Klaus Pichler shares his secret recipe for post production and his creative know-how. Read Klaus’ feature here. On Post-Production, Part 2: An insight into photographer Dean Chalkley’s workflow In the second instalment of this series, Dean Chalkley talks authenticity, why having fun making pictures is important to him, and how post-processing is a means to an end. Read Dean’s feature here. On Post-Production, Part 3: Inside the fantastical world of photographer Simen Johan In the third instalment of this series which looks at post-processing in the photographer’s workflow, Simen Johan talks about how he creates his beguiling images and why digital capture and the best modern imaging software gives him the freedom he craves. Read Simen’s feature here. Sponsored by Adobe Make your best shots even better with Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photography plan. With all the photography essentials, such as Lightroom and Photoshop, you’ll have the world’s leading tools to help you craft …

2017-02-23T16:07:47+00:00

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How to Shoot the Perfect Portrait: Adama Jalloh

Portrait of Britain is inviting photographers to submit images that reflect the unique heritage and diversity of our country and show the face of modern Britain. 100 winning portraits will be selected for a public exhibition showcased nationwide in September 2016. Entries close this Saturday – submit your work soon! We’re asking portrait photographers what goes into making the perfect portrait – this week we hear from Adama Jalloh.  In your view, what makes a compelling portrait? It’s a mixture of things – from the subject’s expression or mannerisms, the tones, the space, how the light might hit the subject. Its always interesting looking back at the results of an image, whether you’ve had 10 seconds of interaction with someone or spent a longer period of time with them. From time to time you get a sense of nervousness from strangers when you ask for their portrait, so being able to capture an unexpected emotion during brief encounters can be interesting. What attracts you to a potential subject? It could be based on the way they are …

2016-07-05T14:04:14+00:00

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How to Shoot the Perfect Portrait: Francesca Allen

Portrait of Britain is inviting photographers to submit images that reflect the unique heritage and diversity of our country and show the face of modern Britain. 100 winning portraits will be selected for a public exhibition showcased nationwide in September 2016. DEADLINE TONIGHT – enter now. We’re asking portrait photographers what goes into making the perfect portrait – this week we hear from Francesca Allen.  In your view, what makes a compelling portrait? Colours, emotion, movement. I like to see that the image was part of a wider story, rather than someone sitting on chair for half an hour. There’s no recipe for a perfect portrait. The most beautiful portraits are those with a thumb over the lens and a blinking subject – what could be more honest than that moment of accidental unawareness?             What attracts you to a potential subject? I’m fascinated by the different ways people react in front of the camera, either by becoming totally in control of themselves or regressing into shyness. It’s a way of learning about myself too. I think that’s …

2016-07-02T10:38:08+00:00

Boy in Sauna copy

How to Shoot the Perfect Portrait: Samuel Bradley

Portrait of Britain is inviting photographers to submit images that reflect the unique heritage and diversity of our country and show the face of modern Britain. 100 winning portraits will be selected for a public exhibition showcased nationwide in September 2016. We’re asking portrait photographers what goes into making the perfect portrait – this week we hear from London-based photographer Samuel Bradley.

2016-06-30T14:53:24+00:00

Jack Davison drove through America’s highways for 10,000 miles, taking portraits along the way

He’s only 24, but English photographer Jack Davison is already carving out a promising career for himself. Essex born and London based, he taught himself how to take pictures after picking up a camera at 16; studying English at Warwick University, he spent most of his time at university taking pictures. Photographing his family, friends and the countryside around him, he says the internet was his major influence and “a tutor”. “The internet introduced me to communities of photographers [and] Flickr, in its heyday, was unparalleled for introducing like-minded artists and creators to each other’s work,” he says. “There were huge swathes of images available to me to take in. I was driven to shoot pretty much non-stop from then on. “I studied English Literature at university [but] despite all the reading and essays there was plenty of time to take pictures,” he adds. “My tutor described my degree as ‘the loyal, drab wife’ that I’d spurned for photography – my exciting mistress.” Nominated by gallerist and curator Zelda Cheatle, who describes Davison as “a …

2015-08-10T11:18:57+00:00

First Place - Rudoi Vladimirovich - Russian Federation

HIPA Awards – Faces category

The Russian photographer Rudoi Vladimirovich won first prize in the Faces category with a portrait of a teenage girl named Stella-Maria. It’s a classicist picture, taken in a photography studio, with the chiaroscuro lighting actively designed to evoke the Golden Hollywood era. Yet Vladimirovich is from a tiny, remote Russian city, and was unable to get a passport to attend the HIPA event. Stella-Maria herself, one gets the impression, could not be further from Hollywood if she tried. Yet everything about her captures why so much art, and so much of popular culture, remains fixated on the female form. “The shadow covering part of Stella-Maria’s face adds to her intrigue, innocence and youth,” Vladimirovich said in a statement. In second place is Kenneth Geiger’s image of Ma Ngua, a 20-year Karen Burmese soldier, taken in 1989, as she guards her post at a rebel stronghold along the border of Burma and Thailand. The ethnic Burmese ‘Mon’ army was made up of 3000 soldiers, with more than 100 women fighting. Geiger found her at the end of a long, winding dirt …

2015-04-21T18:44:04+00:00

Nov2014

BJP #7830: Who am I?

“Who am I?” we ask in the November issue of British Journal of Photography, an issue dedicated to exploring identity and expression in contemporary portraiture, available to buy and download now. We remember the extraordinary life of René Burri, who died on 20 October at the age of 81 after a long battle with cancer. We feature Michael Grieve’s article on Bertien van Manen, who discovered photography as a young mother in 1970s Holland. We celebrate the photography of Danny Lyon, the counter-cultural American documentarian who, as a 20-year-old Jewish New Yorker, hitchhiked to the Deep South to take some of the first pictures of the nascent Civil Rights Movement. And we look ahead to Paris Photo, “the most prestigious fair dedicated to the photographic medium”. The early photographs of Bertien van Manen’s family – “vital images at once considered and free” writes Michael Grieve – were published shortly after her husband’s death. “You do not need to show yourself,” she tells Grieve, “because your photographs already possess the capabilities to do this.” Over the drunken sounds of a …

2015-05-28T16:00:10+00:00

The other portrait show

Founded by photographers Carole Evans and James O Jenkins, Portrait Salon is an annual exhibition showcasing a selection of images that have been rejected from the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize (TWPPP). Following the announcement of the shortlist for the 2011 National Portrait Gallery-run prize, Evans and O Jenkins “noticed a wave of disgruntled photographers on Twitter who had been rejected.” The founders decided to launch the prize as they were convinced there would be strong work among the rejected images, given that such a small percentage of the submitted works is selected for the prize. The idea is based on the first Salon des Refusés that was staged by artists who were rejected from the 1863 Paris Salon. However, as Evans and O Jenkins point out, many rejected works went on to gain significant notoriety, a prime example being Édouard Manet’s Déjeuner sur l’herbe. “This goes to show that juried art shows don’t necessarily reflect the views of the public or predict what will become memorable”, the founders comment. In assembling the judging panel, O Jenkins and Evans …

2014-10-14T18:49:31+00:00

BJP Staff