All posts tagged: richard renaldi

Richard Renaldi reflects on shooting Manhattan Sunday

It’s Saturday night, and darkness has spilled across the city, transforming Manhattan’s sidewalks into a catwalk of bacchanalia, spotlighted by street lamps and neon piping. Clusters of sinewy figures in tank tops lean on metal railings outside favourite haunts such as Studio 54 or Paradise Garage, hips cocked, smoking cigarettes. A wall painting of a large, fleshy tentacle reaching out of a rolling wave frames a set of black doors with signs indicating ‘General Admission’ and ‘VIP Only’. Stepping into a hidden world, you head downstairs and join a steadily expanding crowd of bodies swaying to tribal house beats, swirling in artificial mist and the odour of hormone-spiked sweat laced with chemical stimulants. Faces blur. Everything begins to lose focus. It’s just past midnight when we join photographer Richard Renaldi’s journey through the night. The timestamp [00.07] captions the first image – a shiny, half-full dance floor – in his new photobook, Manhattan Sunday, published by Aperture. Shot over five years, the book delineates a night out on New York’s gay clubbing scene, celebrating its …

2017-02-16T13:39:12+00:00

#BJP 7856: Tales of the City

“It’s my sexiest project, for sure,” says Richard Renaldi of his latest photobook, Manhattan Sunday. Shot late at night and early in the morning in New York’s clubs, it’s a portrait of a nocturnal playground, peopled by free spirits. Renaldi moved to New York in 1986 and immersed himself in its clubs; 20 years later, he still enjoys a night out dancing, but set up a large format camera and tripod to shoot his series, on the dance floors and on the streets nearby. It was, he says “a little nutso, given the liability issues….but fun”. Renaldi’s series is BJP’s latest cover story, in an issue which explores many other facets of urban life. Dayanita Singh’s shots of factories in her native India offer a very different view of the city, for example, recording a country in flux as its manufacturing goes post-industrial. Fred Mortagne’s book Attraper Au Vol, meanwhile, show how skaters adapt rigid cityscapes to their own design, re-imagining the spaces and their possibilities. Meanwhile Mark Neville also explores how the environment is reshaped through play, shooting …

2017-01-31T11:46:29+00:00

BJP Staff