All posts tagged: Robin Maddock

Spot the ball: Robin Maddock’s uncompromising, ambiguous vision of California

From the title of his photographic blog, Ugly Moments Strung Together, you sense that Robin Maddock is prone to critical self-analysis and distrust of aesthetic purity. Despite having two well-received photobooks already published by Trolley (or maybe because of it), Maddock says that he felt disoriented and perplexed when it came to finding inspiration for a new project or approach to work towards. His third book, III, also published by Trolley and shot largely in the harshly-lit urban topography of Los Angeles and San Francisco, is the culmination of this period of introspection and points to a future direction of enquiry that seems at odds with his documentary roots. His first book, Our Kids Are Going To Hell (2009), resulted from his work following police on raids in Hackney. The second, God Forgotten Face (2011), shot in his home town of Plymouth, was already more introspective, even if it remained recognisable as a documentary project, capturing the city as a kind of microcosm of Little England. Or so Maddock thought when he started, thinking of it as a kind of …

2016-01-13T14:44:56+00:00

VIDEO: Cristina de Middel, Benedicte Kurzen and Robin Maddock show different sides of Nigeria

It isn’t often a group photography show can boast the names of Cristina de Middel, Benedicte Kurzen and Robin Maddock. This collaboration, titled Shine Ur Eye, brings together and explores their recent response to living in Lagos, Nigeria, while contrasting each photographers’ dramatically different photographic process. Each photographer found themselves in Nigeria for different reasons, and have responded to the complex layers of Nigerian society in different ways. Exhibited together, their work forms an original photographic essay on Nigeria, recognising the intermingling traditions and practices that shape Nigerian culture. British photographer Robin Maddock is displaying, for the first time, digitised images he discovered in the Nigerian National Museum archive. It contains, he says, “piles of slides, many in a state of decay, like a treasure trove.” The slides are presented as found, with no interference from the photographers, save to present these ethnographic images of masks and other objects as significant insights into Nigerian cultural history and heritage, as well as fascinating photographic records in their own right. The Spanish photographer Cristina de Middel, a former photojournalist, began working  conceptually with the first self-published …

2015-07-10T15:40:33+00:00

BJP Staff