All posts tagged: Roe Ethridge

In Paris: Roe Ethridge’s Sacrifice Your Body

The opening image in his latest book, Sacrifice Your Body, typifies Roe Ethridgeʼs approach. At first sight, itʼs just an ordinary product shot of a Chanel No 5 bottle and its packaging, but closer inspection reveals chipped paint, stray drops of perfume and an intruding wasp. Rippling the surface of a glossy ad with droll other-world elements, itʼs the kind of image thatʼs made him a star in contemporary art, fashion and advertising. Like Juergen Teller, he shoots both commercial and editorial (for the likes of Kenzo, Self Service, Acne Paper and W) alongside his own artwork, and has been shortlisted for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize (in 2011, alongside Elad Lassry, who heʼs often cited with as evidence of a new trend for dry conceptualism). The Deutsche Börse organisers described his work as follows: “Blurring the boundaries of the commercial with the editorial, and the mundane with the highbrow, Ethridge’s conceptual approach to photography is a playful attack on the traditions and conventions of the medium itself.”

2017-11-10T18:35:13+00:00

Doing a Double Take on image appropriation

“Copyright has never interested me,” said Richard Prince in 2011, according to a photographer suing him for image appropriation (and as reported in The Guardian). “For most of my life I owned half a stereo, so there was no point in suing me, but that’s changed now and it’s interesting… “So, sometimes it’s better not to be successful and well-known and you can get away with much more. I knew what I was stealing 30 years ago but it didn’t matter because no one cared, no one was paying any attention.” They’re paying attention now, and Prince’s work is now included in a group show at London’s Skarstedt gallery – Double Take, which also includes work by Roe Ethridge, Collier Schorr, Anne Collier, Barbara Kruger and Robert Heinecken (among others). Spanning from the 1960s to the present day, the show focuses on art that appropriates images, to show “the power of pictures in shaping ideas of identity, gender, race, desire and sexuality”. “The great thing about appropriation is that even though the transformation reads as fiction, everybody knows …

2017-03-06T12:32:17+00:00

BJP Staff