All posts tagged: russian

The lasting effects of World War Two in Veterans

A young boy who became a French resistance fighter as just a teenager; a German fighter who lost an arm; a Kazakhstani field nurse; an Indian deployed to fight the Japanese in Burma; a Holocaust survivor who is today a Donald Trump supporter. Sasha Maslov’s photobook Veterans travels the world to meet with some of the last surviving servicemen and women of the Second World War, a conflict whose impact is still being felt some seven decades after the conflict finished.

2017-08-16T14:24:18+00:00

Book: Amplitude No.1 – 10 publications by 10 Russian photographers

Founded in 2006 by photographer and curator Olga Korsunova, art-manager and photography critic Nadya Sheremetova, and art historian Elena Zyrianova, FotoDepartment is a gallery, bookshop, library and education hub in St. Petersburg, Russia. Aiming to promote and develop contemporary Russian photography at home and abroad, FotoDepartment runs many events, exhibitions and workshops, and represents internationally-recognised artists such as Kirill Savchenkov, Irina Yulieva, and Jana Romanova. FotoDepartment is also currently running several digital projects. Now it’s started a publishing project called Amplitude, creating photobooks of emerging Russian photographers’ work which can be read individually, or gathered together into groups. Amplitude No.1 includes photobooks by Alexey Bogolepov, Margo Ovcharenko, Irina Zadorozhnaia, Anastasia Tsayder, Igor Samolet, Yury Gudkov, Olya Ivanova, Irina Ivannikova, Anastasia Tailakova, and Irina Yulieva. BJP caught up with Nadya Sheremetova to find out more

2017-08-02T15:14:32+00:00

Book: Meanwhile Across the Mountain by Jens Olof Lasthein

Jens Olof Lasthein, a Swedish-born photographer brought up in Denmark, has spent much of his career travelling around the European hinterlands, where international boundaries have been shifting for centuries. His new book, Meanwhile Across the Mountain, published by Max Ström, is a stunning survey of the Caucasus – the part of southeastern Europe that used to belong to the Soviet Union, but is now a collection of sovereign states and breakaway regions such as South Ossetia, Dagestan and Chechnya.

2017-07-13T17:06:10+00:00

The thin blue line: Combining Russian policewomen and the criminals they capture

Social networks allow us to project whatever image we choose onto the people we’re connected to, and images – those we take of ourselves and of others – form a central role in the way we perform for others in the online space. And this sense of performance lies at the heart of a project by Russian photographer Anastasia Rudenko, which features images of policewomen and criminals she has found online. From 2011 to 2014, Rudenko, who was born in the South Kazakhstan region of the former Soviet Union, collected images sourced from Russian social networking sites, including Odnoklassniki.ru, a social network for schoolmates past and present, akin to Friends Reunited. These kind of sites are everywhere in Russia, she says, and they provide an “avalanche” of images that can make a useful starting point for her personal projects. “I collect snapshots and then decide how I can use them, either as found images or as material for my own photography. In my work, I try to analyse sections of modern Russian society from different angles. …

2015-12-16T12:22:18+00:00

Svetlana Shutkina: the photography novice learning from Magnum experts

Earlier this year, Magnum Photos collaborated with The Nippon Photography Institute to hold international workshops for promising young photographers, in partnership with the BJP. The workshop were led by three leading Magnum photographers, each of whom have produced a book in Tokyo at points of their career: Bruce Gilden (Go), Jacob Aue Sobol (I, Tokyo), and Gueorgui Pinkhassov (Sightwalk). Russian amateur photographer Svetlana Shutkina was selected from the attendees for the Fuji Camera Award, winning a Fujifilm X100T camera . Pinkhassov, whose 1996 series collected stolen moments of everyday Tokyo life, said that selecting a winner was a tough task, but Shutkina’s work and unique story was too good to ignore. “Svetlana’s case is a special one,” he says, “[as] a native of Chabarovsk she resides in Tokyo. Initially Svetlana hesitated to join because she could not speak English and was a complete novice in photography… [but] the more professional a photographer, the less flexible she/he is.” For Pinkhassov, a Magnum member since 1991, the secret lies in “letting go and letting an image come …

2015-08-25T11:33:46+00:00

Tatiana Gulenkina – Things Merging and Falling Apart

“I first began experimenting with cameraless techniques in a colour darkroom in 2010,” says Russian photographer Tatiana Gulenkina, who is based in Washington DC. “I originally thought it would be a fun side project but I ended up falling in love with the process. There is something magical about working with your hands.” In Things Merging and Falling Apart, Gulenkina, who last year was shortlisted for Photo Boite’s 30 Under 30 Women Photographers competition, creates photograms, but instead of placing objects directly onto a light-sensitive surface, she suspends them above it, submerges them in water or oil, or moves them around during the exposure. “In the past, I used anything from plants and live organisms to springs, ribbons and cardboard cutouts,” she explains. “I’m not trying to portrait a particular object, and I’m obviously not the first one to come up with this concept.” In one image, Gulenkina placed a flower in a small tank of water on top of light-sensitive paper, for example, letting the stem unravel. “You can sort of see a bud …

2015-10-13T12:08:11+00:00

Grimaldi Gavin’s inside job

“The number of people we’ve had in to see this show have been unbelievable,” says Julie Gavin, co-director of Grimaldi Gavin on the gallery’s new show Fuel present: Russian Criminal Tattoo Police Files, which opened on 17 October. “We had 50 people in on Monday morning alone,” chips in her partner, Camilla Grimaldi. “And our audience has been interesting,” adds Gavin. “We’ve had our established collector base come and find it interesting, but we’ve also had some very different, much younger people who maybe we wouldn’t ordinarily attract.” It’s easy to see why – curated from the archive of criminal tattoo photographs held by the Fuel design group and publishing house, this exhibition is an extraordinary insight into the Russian underworld’s inky symbolism. Collected – and often shot – by expert criminologist Arkady Bronnikov between the mid-1960s and the mid-1980s, the images were originally put together to help break the convicts’ code and have a stark formalism, and often palpable tension, that makes for very interesting viewing. Damon Murray and Stephen Sorrell, the directors of …

2014-11-26T21:55:35+00:00

BJP Staff