All posts tagged: street photography

Tokyo, 2015. @David Gaberle, courtesy of the artist

Photobook: Metropolight by David Gaberle

Five years ago David Gaberle went through “a really rough time” after moving to London. A friend suggested he pick up a camera to help process his experience, and he found that photography “really eases the experience of the sensory overload that comes with living in a big city”. By 2015 he was ready to embark on an ambitious new project inspired by this work, and invested all his savings in travelling to the world’s biggest cities to shoot them. On the move for eight months and changing location every few weeks, he covered over 3600km. “The constant search was the happiest time of my life,” he says. Originally from the Czech Republic, Gaberle studied anthropology back home and has a researcher’s perspective on the modern metropolis. “In the big cities, people spend less time with other people which means they have more time to become different, developing themselves,” he says. “There are more interesting personalities in the cities.” At the same time, though, he finds big cities can be “really dehumanising”, because “they have an effect on how …

2017-04-04T14:36:17+00:00

© Dougie Wallace/INSTITUTE

From Botoxed faces to yapping pooches: A glimpse inside the hidden world of the super rich

If there is a photographer who has a knack for being in the right place at the right time, it’s Dougie Wallace. For more than ten years, the East London-based Glaswegian photographer, has been turning his camera on everyone from stags and hens to Shoreditch hipsters, Bombay taxi drivers, and now the super rich. Getting uncomfortably close to his subjects with a double flashgun, Glaswegee as he is known creates colourful unforgiving images that reveal the unedited reality behind his subjects. We see stags trussed up like turkeys, scantily-clad women cavorting around London, and yapping dogs snarling into the lens. Few photographers get closer than this. In particular, Wallace’s Olympus-shot images of the global super rich in London’s elite districts of Knightsbridge and Chelsea paint a telling picture of glut and greed. This so-called ‘one per cent’ is the subject of Wallace’s Harrodsburg, a project recently published as a book by Dewi Lewis. It is nothing less than a visual satire on the ultra affluent elite and their exorbitant spending habits. Wallace, who is represented …

2017-03-10T11:38:49+00:00

01_ Press Image l Saul Leiter, Snow, 1960 copy

Ordinary Beauty: Revisiting Saul Leiter’s pioneering images

During his lifetime, Saul Leiter (1923–2013) was something of the ignored artist of American photographic history. While his career spanned a time when quintessential New York street photography was defined as swift, sharp and precise, Leiter’s leisured, impressionist style went against the grain. Leiter was a pioneer of colour photography, adventurously using Kodachrome colour slide film well before the likes of William Eggleston and Joel Meyerowitz. As the Guardian’s Sean O’Hagan wrote in Leiter’s obituary, “[his photographs] are as much about evoking an atmosphere as nailing the decisive moment.” A retrospective of the late photographer’s work has just began at The Photographers’ Gallery; the first major public show of his work in the UK features more than 100 works, including early black-and-white and colour photographs, sketchbooks and related materials.     While Leiter’s early black-and-white images were published in LIFE magazine and exhibited in New York and Tokyo, he quickly moved into fashion photography, shooting for Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, British Vogue, Esquire and more. When I speak to Brett Rogers, director of the Soho gallery …

2016-02-26T16:00:03+00:00

Comings and Goings, Brick Lane, 1986

London Life: Colin O’Brien’s reflections on a changing city

Hackney-based Colin O’Brien has carved out of a reputation as one of the most important photographers documenting life in the capital. The steady buzz around his work continues to grow with the release of his latest book, London Life, published by Spitalfields Life Books, and his new exhibition at the new Leica Store City gallery based at The Royal Exchange, London. Now in his mid 70s, he is a delight to interview – witty, pithy and passionate. Over a coffee, O’Brien reflects upon a career in photography that started when he was eight, taking pictures of his friends playing together on the bomb sites of postwar London. Over decades O’Brien has built up a vast archive of images, so it is perhaps unsurprising that anyone viewing his work becomes acutely conscious of the changing face of life in the city he records.     These days Hackney itself seems to be a metaphor for constant urban renewal, something O’Brien is all too aware of. “When we first moved to Hackney [in the early 1980s], a …

2015-12-02T14:06:10+00:00

Evangelical Church, North London © Ian Berry/Magnum

How England has changed over forty years, by Magnum’s Ian Berry

“Photography is not an intellectual pursuit. It’s about becoming a hunter – getting yourself into the right place at the right time,” says Ian Berry. A member of Magnum Photos since 1962, Ian Berry knows what he’s talking about. He’s worked as a photojournalist in Vietnam, Israel, China, Ireland, Ethiopia and the former Soviet Union (to name but a few). But he’s perhaps most famous for his documentation of the 1960 Sharpeville massacre in apartheid South Africa, his photographic work the evidence used in the trial that eventually proved the victims’ innocence. His current exhibition, The English at the Lucy Bell Gallery in Hastings on England’s south coast, hits a little closer to home. Mostly taken in 1975, Berry conceived of the project as “a personal exploration of English life”. To that end, he travelled the length and breadth of the country photographing young and old, rich and poor, city and country, home and work. Seen here, in 2015, the collection stands as a vivid time capsule, some aspects familiar, some very alien. BJP spoke to Ian about …

2015-11-03T12:51:10+00:00

Sam Horine’s New York

BJP

Sam Horine’s photographs seem to breathe New York, but he actually grew up in Maine, the small, rural state in New England. His parents were native to Chicago, but got caught in the “back-to-the-woods movement”, he says. Horine would spend his evenings stuck in his parents’ National Geographic magazines. He started to shoot 35mm film of anything that caught his eye – “interesting patterns, vibrant colours, a great-looking face, good lighting or just plain weirdness”. At 18, he left the woodlands of Maine and moved to Upstate New York, pursuing a degree in religious studies and Eastern philosophy at Hartwick College, a small liberal arts college at the foot of the Catskill mountains. While he continued to shoot 35mm at Hartwick, he started experimenting with instant film: “Polaroid was still relatively cheap in the late 1990s,” he says. Then, in 2002, he made the big move to the Big Apple: “I moved to NY for no real reason other than I had a friend who was moving to Brooklyn and needed a roommate. It seemed like …

2015-04-17T13:26:36+00:00

Werner Amann – Surf Fiction

Surf Fiction is a visual assault, a larger-than-life collision of text and images inspired by comic book culture. Shot during several trips to Miami, Los Angeles and Las Vegas, it’s a melting pot of video stills, close-up portraits, street photography and apparently staged scenes, which German photographer Werner Amann published with White Press Books late last year; featuring larger-than-life characters and fast-paced editing, it convincingly blurs the boundaries between fact and fiction. “The initial idea was to relate photography not only to its history but to other media – TV, film, video, surveillance footage, comic-book culture, typography, and conceptual art – but to keep the heart of the project in the realm of classic photography,” explains the 45 year old. “One theme is how media culture relates to our present social reality. How can we re-appropriate the world – not only the world of images, but the world itself, for ourselves?” The ‘surf’ of the title is a play on words, referencing both surfing the net and, metaphorically, the mediation of everyday life, “like zapping through …

2015-04-17T13:52:19+00:00

Emine Gozde Sevim – Embed in Egypt

BJP

A fortnight after Emine Gozde Sevim arrived in Arizona as a high school scholarship student, two planes crashed into the World Trade Center. “It made me realise how powerful an image can be – how pictures can serve as a record,” she says, by phone from her apartment in New York. “If nobody makes a record, we can’t connect to what happened in the same way.” She took up photography soon afterwards. As a child, Sevim had adored making little films with a video camera but, until 9/11, she’d had no real contact with photography proper, she says. She grew up in Istanbul, “which differs from the rest of Europe – visual culture is not paid much attention”. Born in Turkey, with Afghan roots on her mother’s side, she felt personally as well as intellectually affected by 9/11. “It felt like a big historical breaking point, that the world was separating into East and West, more distant than they had ever been,” she says. “I was being educated in America, and I come from a …

2015-04-17T13:57:18+00:00

Last Stop

A battered old hatchback rolls up outside Folkestone Central station and George Georgiou – with a shy, blokey smile – leans over to pop the passenger door before driving me through the seaside town he now calls home. He sits in the driver’s seat as if he were in his armchair at home. For a long time, a car was the closest thing he had to a home. He has driven all over the world with his wife, photographer Vanessa Winship, covering thousands upon thousands of miles, travelling all over Turkey, the Balkans, Georgia and Ukraine for a decade, then across the US. It has been a long journey, motivated solely by his desire to tell people’s stories. “Welcome to my hotel,” he says in that distinctive north London accent. On the seafront, Georgiou leads me up the steps and into the heart of a grand, faded old building. It was indeed once a hotel, and the patterned carpets and ornate banisters remain. “It reminds me of The Shining a bit,” he says, with half …

2015-04-17T14:16:58+00:00

BJP Staff