All posts tagged: Taschen

Architecture goes California Crazy

In 1920s America, at the dawn of the automobile age, diners and souvenir shops sought new, creative ways to lure drivers into their roadside establishments. The result was eccentric structures all along America’s Sunbelt, designed to be spotted from miles away. The roster includes owls, dinosaurs, coffee-pots, and even a Mexican giant standing on a roof serving nachos and beer. At the time, the architectural establishment dismissed these structures as “monstrosities”, but they flourished nevertheless, and now they’re even celebrated. 

2018-05-31T09:17:59+00:00

The dark side of the City of Angels

“The streets were dark with something more than night,” wrote Raymond Chandler in The Simple Art of Murder (1950). Born in Chicago but brought up in Los Angeles, Chandler helped create the genre that became synonymous with the City of Angels – the grimy, morally ambiguous Noir. And, suggests a new book by Taschen’s executive editor Jim Heimann, there’s good reason why LA gave birth to Noir. A small (though already shady) city until 1892, it was transformed when oil was discovered in modern day Echo Park. The black gold brought in money, and with it corruption, and a series of lurid real-life crimes. At the same time, Hollywood and the burgeoning newspaper industry helped ensure a plentiful supply of photographers, documenting both the good and the bad to be found.

2018-02-20T12:26:59+00:00

Peter Beard’s landmark work documenting man-made destruction done to Africa’s wildlife

“The deeper the white man went into Africa, the faster the life flowed out of it, off the plains and out of the bush…vanishing in acres of trophies and hides and carcasses” proclaimed renowned photographer and artist Peter Beard in his 1965 seminal publication The End Game, a tome highlighting the atrocities of man made destruction done to Africa’s wildlife in the National Parks of Kenya’s Tsavo lowlands and Uganda.     And in 2015, deeper the white man goes. July saw online outrage erupt over the merciless killing of Cecil the Lion in Zimbabwe, poached by US dentist Walter Palmer for a sum of $50,000. Meanwhile as the world mourned Cecil, five of Kenya’s endangered elephants were quietly slain in Tsavo, to the absent furor of almost no media attention. This devastating poaching incident echoes The End Game’s haunting images and text that fill its 292 pages, which chronicle the same ruthless fate these endangered elephants were subject to half a century ago as they are today.     The 50th anniversary edition of …

2015-11-18T13:22:01+00:00

Sanibal Island. 1976. An outtake from the session for the record Black and Blue. Photo by Hiro. ©The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones – 53 years in photography

At over 500 pages and weighing 10 pounds, Taschen’s new photographic survey of The Rolling Stones reflects the magnitude of the band’s 53-year-long career. Philip Townsend’s photograph of the band wearing checked suits and slightly awkward smiles on the eve of their first British tour is among the images to document the band’s bright-eyed and blues-obsessed beginnings. Shots from the height of fame follow, such as Michael Cooper’s saturated colour photographs, which capture the band draped in all the trappings of 60s psychedelia. The journey draws to a close with Anton Corbijn’s striking black and white shots of The Stones in 2005, visibly aged but lacking none of the spark of youth. For a publication that boasts the work of several prominent photographers – Cecil Beaton, David Bailey, Ethan Russell and Annie Leibovitz to name but a few – choosing a cover must have been difficult. A photograph taken by British photographer Gered Mankowitz is given the pride of place. Shot during the same session which produced the cover of the band’s 1967 album Between …

2015-04-21T18:41:43+00:00

BJP Staff