All posts tagged: The Photographers’ Gallery

01_ Press Image l Saul Leiter, Snow, 1960 copy

Ordinary Beauty: Revisiting Saul Leiter’s pioneering images

During his lifetime, Saul Leiter (1923–2013) was something of the ignored artist of American photographic history. While his career spanned a time when quintessential New York street photography was defined as swift, sharp and precise, Leiter’s leisured, impressionist style went against the grain. Leiter was a pioneer of colour photography, adventurously using Kodachrome colour slide film well before the likes of William Eggleston and Joel Meyerowitz. As the Guardian’s Sean O’Hagan wrote in Leiter’s obituary, “[his photographs] are as much about evoking an atmosphere as nailing the decisive moment.” A retrospective of the late photographer’s work has just began at The Photographers’ Gallery; the first major public show of his work in the UK features more than 100 works, including early black-and-white and colour photographs, sketchbooks and related materials.     While Leiter’s early black-and-white images were published in LIFE magazine and exhibited in New York and Tokyo, he quickly moved into fashion photography, shooting for Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, British Vogue, Esquire and more. When I speak to Brett Rogers, director of the Soho gallery …

2016-02-26T16:00:03+00:00

Barricade made from barrels, 1916

Historic photojournalism depicting the growth of Irish nationalism

“The Irish can’t forget their history because the English refuse to remember it,” says Luke Dodd, quoting renowned academic Terry Eagleton. If that’s true, it’s something Dodd hopes to change with an exhibition at The Photographers’ Gallery devoted to Ireland’s rebellion against British rule. The Easter Rising 1916: Sean Sexton Collection depicts the growth of Irish nationalism, the uprising of 1916, the subsequent emergence of the Irish Free State, and how it all played out in images. Dodd, who has just edited a book of Jane Brown’s photojournalism, has drawn the images from a private collection of more than 20,000 prints put together by Sexton over the last 50 years. Including press and military photographs, amateur shots and postcards, Sexton’s archive is outstanding, says Dodd, because it’s so comprehensive, but at the same time so personal. “He’s a slightly eccentric character and has searched everywhere – he’s been to every car boot sale, and voraciously collected anything Irish,” he says. “That means there’s a lot of obscure stuff, but that’s also its great strength. “There aren’t …

2016-01-12T17:34:56+00:00

Stockfish, 2014 © Jack Latham

Jack Latham wins the second edition of the Bar-Tur Photobook Award

Welsh photographer Jack Latham has won the Bar-Tur Photobook Award, for his project Sugar Paper Theories. Latham will work with The Photographers’ Gallery and Here Press to produce his first photobook, a prize worth £20,000.   The winning project traces an infamous true crime case in Iceland. Known as the Reykjavik Confessions, it involved the testimonies of six people, who confessed to two murders they had no apparent memory of. Latham employed a mix of archival images, ephemera and his own photographs to convey the sinister ambience of a horrific, yet hazy collective memory. Latham tells BJP, “the Bar-Tur Award will really enable us to be as ambitious with the project as possible. The case itself is so complicated and trying to retell it through photographs alone wouldn’t be enough. I’m working with writer Sofia Kathryn Smith and now, continuing the project with a book in mind means we’re able to collaborate fully in a symbiotic way. Working with an exciting publisher like Here Press goes hand and hand with the work, it’s different and hopefully the book will reflect …

2015-12-02T15:19:39+00:00

Nicolas Haeni and Thomas Rousset, untitled, from Self Publish, Be Happy (Aperture/Self Publish, Be Happy, 2015)

Self Publish, Be Happy takes over The Photographers’ Gallery

Things are going to look very different at The Photographers’ Gallery this week. In the first of a new series of experimental publisher residencies, they’ve invited Self Publish, Be Happy to take over their studio floor and use the space as they wish. Coinciding with the launch of SPBH founder Bruno Ceschel’s new book Self Publish, Be Happy: A DIY Photobook Manual and Manifesto (Aperture/SPBH Editions 2015), there will be a series of talks and workshops around the world of self-publishing. Ceschel was in the midst of moving his Dalston studio into The Photographers’ Gallery, but found time earlier this week to talk to us about the interesting ways he’ll be using the space. “We’re taking over a whole floor, yesterday we loaded a van with literally most of our studio – so a thousand self-published books from our collection that the public will have access to, even our tables and chairs – and we’re going to be running our whole office from The Photographer’s Gallery. “It’s a chance for the audience to see what …

2015-11-20T15:13:34+00:00

Berlin stories of transgression, sexuality and landscape

“The Tiergarten is Berlin’s oldest urban public park and is kind of a cross between Hyde Park and Hampstead Heath. It’s an amazing space, with an amazing history right at the heart of the city. If you can get your head around the Tiergarten I think you can start to get your head around Berlin and its history,” says photographer Marc Vallée. This July he attended a conference on the park called Tiergarten, Landscape of Transgression at the Haus der Kulturern der Welt, and he’s turned his visual response to the issues discussed there into a zine. Including 12 images over 24 pages, the zine documents a queer anarchist exploring the park’s historic gay cruising area. It’s been a hookup hotspot for the last 100 years or so, even during the Nazi era, and the zine looks at landscape and space, sexuality and the act of transgression – or the act of seeking it out. It’s the seventh zine Vallée has put together, starting in 2012 with Writers, documenting the London graffiti scene, and Anti-Skateboarding …

2015-08-28T13:35:23+00:00

Nominations are out for Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2015

Africa figures large in the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2015, with nominations for South African photographers Mikhael Subotzky and Zanele Muholi, and for Viviane Sassen, a Dutch photographer who was raised in Kenya and chooses to make work on the continent. Subotzky is nominated for his collaboration with UK born editor and artist Patrick Waterhouse, however, while Russian photographer Nikolai Bakharev completes the four-strong shortlist. Works by the shortlisted photographers will be exhibited at The Photographers’ Gallery in London from 17 April until 07 June 2015 before going to the MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt; the winner of the £30,000 prize will be announced at The Photographers’ Gallery at an awards ceremony on 28 May 2015. Image-makers are nominated for the annual prize for specific bodies of work exhibited or published in Europe over the preceding 12 months; this year Sassen (b. 1972) – whose fashion photography is currently on show at The Photographers’ Gallery – has been nominated for her exhibition Umbra, shown at Nederlands Fotomuseum in Rotterdam from 08 March until 01 June 2014. Bakharev (b. 1946) has been nominated for his exhibition …

2015-04-17T14:19:03+00:00

Director of The Photographers’ Gallery receives OBE

Brett Rogers has been awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday 2014 Honours List for services to the arts. In her thirty-year career, Rogers has been instrumental in establishing photography as a leading art form, both in the UK and internationally. Rogers was appointed director at The Photographers’ Gallery in 2005, and to date has led the London gallery through a number of changes, including a move to new premises on Ramilles Street in Soho and an 18-month-long £9.2m redevelopment project, which saw the gallery transformed into a world-class exhibition and education space for photography. The gallery re-opened to the public in May 2012. Prior to The Photographers’ Gallery, Rogers, who moved to the UK from Australia in 1980 to study a Masters at The Courtauld Institute of Art, worked at the British Council from 1985 to 2005 in the Visual Arts Department, where she was director of exhibitions. During her time at the British Council, she was responsible for establishing its photography programme and policy, as well as organising major exhibitions that include: Anish Kapoor for the British Pavilion at the 44th Venice Biennale in 1990; Look at Me – Fashion and Photography …

2014-06-19T17:51:07+00:00

BJP Staff