All posts tagged: Tim Pearse

Breakthrough’s past winners explain how the award propelled them to the next level

The Breakthrough Awards offer an invaluable opportunity for emerging photographers – with winning work being showcased to some of photography’s most influential figures at the Free Range Graduate Shows, featured in British Journal of Photography’s print and online channels and displayed worldwide on leading file-transfer website, WeTransfer. We caught up with the inaugural crop of Breakthrough winners – Felix von der Osten, Adama Jalloh, Tanya Houghton and Tim Pearse (Undergraduate Series Award, Undergraduate Single Image Award, Graduate Series Award and Graduate Single Image Award winners, respectively) – to ask how Breakthrough has winning the award has pushed their career and artistic practice to the next level. How did the Breakthrough Award help advance your career? FELIX VON DER OSTEN: It exposed my work to all different kinds of people [in the UK]. Breakthrough really helped get my name out there as a new emerging photographer. ADAMA JALLOH: It definitely helped with my work being acknowledged by more people and them showing interest in other projects I’m working on. Emma Bowkett, the photo editor of the Financial Times Weekend Magazine, saw …

2016-05-11T10:57:31+00:00

How Tim Pearse won the graduate single image award  

This image may look simple, but a lot of time and craftsmanship has gone in its creation. It is a lith print, made by Tim Pearse, a former BA photography student at Plymouth College of Art. And it is with this image that Pearse won the singles prize in the recent graduate category of the BJP Breakthrough Awards, which was judged by BJP editor Simon Bainbridge, photography curator Leo Scott, and photographer Laura Pannack. Working exclusively with analogue and alternative photographic processes, Pearse crafted the image as part of a longer untitled series of lith prints. “I wanted to create a discourse on constructed memory through the perception of ambiguous form,” says Pearse. “I wanted to illicit the asking of questions of self… we can look at any object or place and it generate something intangible within ourselves.” Pearse took the image on a Mamiya RB67 camera loaded with Ilford Delta 100 film, and printed it as a lith print using lith developer, which gives the image its soft, hand-drawn quality, he says. “I learnt this process while I was at university and have worked with it ever since. I like being part of every point in the making of the photograph, and being able to have …

2015-05-26T16:00:03+00:00

BJP Staff