All posts tagged: Visa pour l’Image

Rémy Artiges’ 27893NC, a vision of Wilson, North Carolina

What’s your vision of America? Dominating popular culture for years, it’s a country nearly everyone has an image of, encountered via films, TV, books, and music. French photographer Rémy Artiges first went to the US “a few decades” ago, experiencing the country “at her climax”, as he puts it, “carrying in her all the past and present photographic projections, accounting for all the technologies of contemporary representation of a time when she invented herself, images emissaries of the one who we served so many examples without really knowing why today”. When he was invited to go back by the festival Eyes on Main Street, he tried to go with without preconceptions, to let “reality there catch me up”. It helped that the residency was so open-ended, with no parameters other than that he stick around and make work in Wilson, North Carolina during November, 2017. Wilson has a population of roughly 50,000 people and, once at the heart of the tobacco industry, saw a decline in its fortunes when the tobacco warehouses closed down. Today the …

2018-09-04T15:15:49+00:00

Laura Morton wins the 2018 Canon Female Photojournalist Award

American photographer Laura Morton has won the 2018 Canon Female Photojournalist Award. The award gives her €8000 funding towards a new project, which will be exhibited at the 2019 Visa Pour l’Image festival.

Originally trained in Political Science and Journalism, Morton has previously shot projects on FARC guerrillas in Colombia, the segregation and oppression of Pashtun women in Pakistan, and military sexual assault survivors in the US, and her project on young tech entrepreneurs in San Francisco, Wild West Tech, was funded by the Magnum Foundation and published in BJP’s April 2016 relaunch issue. But she won the award with a pitch for a new project titled University Avenue, named after a road which runs through two very different districts of her home town, San Francisco.

2018-09-03T12:52:19+00:00

Obituary: Abbas, photographer and Magnum Photos member, 1944-2018

“I used to describe myself as a photojournalist, and was very proud of it,” wrote Abbas in 2017. “The choice was to think of oneself either as a photojournalist or an artist. It wasn’t out of humility that I called myself a photojournalist, but arrogance. I thought photojournalism was superior, but these days I don’t call myself a photojournalist because, although I use the techniques of a photojournalist and get published in magazines and newspapers, I am working at things in depth and over long periods of time. I don’t just make stories about what’s happening. I’m making stories about my way of seeing what’s happening.” Abbas has been described as a “born photographer”, who over his 60-year career covered war and revolution in Vietnam, the Middle East, Bangladesh, Biafra, Chile, Cuba, Apartheid South Africa, and Northern Ireland. He also pursued a lifelong interest in religion in his work, shooting in 29 countries to create the book and exhibition Allah O Akbar: A Journey Through Militant Islam, and publishing long-term series on Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, and animism. 

2018-05-14T13:54:00+00:00

Woman Paper Visa journal celebrates female photojournalists

Anna Alix Koffi realised that the issue of women in photojournalism was so big that it warranted a publication of its own, and started thinking out a framework for a second edition of Visa Paper focusing on work by women. “I realised I could do this because there are women artists everywhere I go,” she says. “Most of the time publications don’t focus on women, but I knew that Woman Paper Visa would be special because women in photojournalism is a strong thing. It’s much more difficult than any other form of photography.”

2017-11-23T18:21:43+00:00

Getty Images announces its 2017 grant winners

“The recipients of the 2017 Getty Images Editorial Photography Grants are working at the cutting edge of photojournalism, ensuring that often ignored global issues are brought to the forefront of public consciousness,” said Hugh Pinney, Vice President of News, Getty Images. This year’s winners see projects taking place in war torn Mosul, documenting the unrest in Venezuela and refugees seeking new homes in Europe.

2017-09-08T11:03:44+00:00

Festivals: Visa Pour l’Image returns for the 29th time

The Visa Pour l’Image festival returns for the 29th time – to “turbulent time”, in which “photojournalists are obviously needed, and play an essential role which is now more important than ever” as the co-founder and director general Jean-François Leroy puts it

2017-06-29T12:32:59+00:00

Magnum Photographers Show Images of Refugees at Visa Pour L’Image

The exhibition, at Visa Pour L’Image Perpignan, is a collaboration between Magnum Photos and Canon, who will also be providing a free portfolio reviews for emerging photographers at the festival. Providing a historic context to the current migration crisis in Europe, Exile, will include images of civilians returning home following World War II by Robert Capa; Philip Jones Griffiths’ Vietnamese woman fleeing a US bomb attack; and John Vink’s documentation of the displaced in South Sudan. Presenting coverage of conflicts ranging from the Six Day War, Iraq, Rwanda and the Arab Spring the exhibition also includes work by Abbas, Bruno Barbey, Robert Capa, Thomas Dworzak, Alex Majoli, Susan Meiselas, Paulo Pellegrin and Jerome Sessini amongst others. Forgoing historical, chronological or geographical order, the exhibition aims to illustrate the sheer number of those uprooted, made homeless and transient, progressing towards an uncertain future. Exile, in collaboration with Canon at Visa Pour L’Image Perpignan, France, will go on display 29 August – 4 September 2016. For more information see here.

2016-08-16T16:09:46+00:00

BJP Staff